New Bunk Covers Eliminate Standing Water In Old Tires

11/3/2012 7:00 AM

As farming moved away from upright silos to store ensiled corn silage and haylage, concrete bunker silos and drive-over piles have become increasingly popular.

The forage is chopped, packed tightly, and covered with a plastic sheet. Traditionally, farmers have used old, worn out tires to hold the plastic down on the bunker or pile to prevent air from penetrating into the silage mass.

Full-casing tires are often difficult to move and hold water. A typical 50-by-100-foot bunker could use as many as 500 tires.

Water that stands for as little as four days can become a breeding area for mosquitoes and causes an increased risk of West Nile virus. Mosquitoes feed on both birds and mammals. They become infected in the late summer and can spread the virus to humans, horses and other hosts.

Eliminating hundreds of tires from a bunker or pile by using a tireless covering system such as Secure Covers can save people and stock from exposure to this deadly disease

Charvin Farms’ Secure Covers is a covering system overlaying poly sheets and eliminating tires. The covers are made from knitted, V stable polyethylene and are used over normal polyethylene silage sheets, fixed in place using gravel bags.

The system’s construction disperses wind, making sure the silage sheet remains in place without adding tires to protect against crop spoilage and bird damage.


Is the USDA doing enough to accommodate small-scale direct-marketers of meat?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Unsure

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9/30/2014 | Last Updated: 2:46 PM