Market Reports for August 24, 2013

8/24/2013 7:00 AM

Market at a Glance
Lancaster County Livestock Auction Averages
Prices Per Hundredweight
Aug. 23, 2013
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

STEERS, CHOICE 2-3: This week 123.40; Last week 122.90; Last year 116.85.

HOLSTEIN STEERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 108.70; Last week 107.50; Last year 103.40.

HEIFERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 118.75; Last week 120.30; Last year 114.30.

COWS, BREAKERS, 75-80% LEAN: This week 80.50; Last week 79.15; Last year 78.35.

COWS, BONERS, 80-85% LEAN: This week 77.55; Last week 76.75; Last year 74.65.

BULLS, YG 1: This week 97.90; Last week 96.50; Last year 97.10.

HOGS, 49-54% LEAN, MONDAY: This week 73.75; Last week 76.50; Last year 68.25.

LAMBS, CHOICE/PRIME 80-110 LB: This week 136.75; Last week 118.00; Last year 150.00.

BULL CALVES, #1: This week 134.50; Last week 126.75; Last year 106.35.

KID GOATS, SELECTION 1 (head): This week 153.75; Last week 132.00.

PA Weekly Livestock Trends
Lewisburg, Pa.
Aug. 16, 2013
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Combined Livestock Receipts from New Holland, Vintage, Dewart, Middleburg, Greencastle, Lebanon Valley and Waynesburg.

CATTLE: This week 2925; Last week 3358; Last year 3549. CALVES: This week 2658; Last week 2473; Last year 2897. HOGS: This week 1124; Last week 1124; Last year 1341. FEEDER PIGS: This week 122; Last week 122; Last year 528. LAMBS/SHEEP: This week 3349; Last week 3349; Last year 2747. GOATS: This week 1935; Last week 1935; Last year 2375.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Compared to last week`s market, slaughter steers sold mostly steady to 1.00 higher. Slaughter holsteins and slaughter heifers sold 1.00 to 1.50 higher. Slaughter cows sold .50 to 1.00 higher and slaughter bulls sold steady.

FEEDER CATTLE: No trend available.

HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week, holstein bull calves sold considerably higher with strong buyer demand. Bull calves traded 25.00 to 30.00 higher and holstein heifers sold steady to 5.00 higher.

HOGS: Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 4.00 to 5.00 lower. Sows sold 2.00 to 3.00 lower.

SLAUGHTER SHEEP: When compared to last week, slaughter lambs sold mostly steady to 10.00 lower. Slaughter ewes sold 5.00 to 10.00 lower.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kids sold mostly steady. Slaughter nanny goats sold mostly 10.00 to 20.00 higher. Slaughter billies sold mostly 10.00 to 20.00 higher.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Lancaster County Weekly Cattle
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 23, 2013
Report Supplied By USDA

CATTLE: 2528; Last week 2588; Last year 2570. CALVES: 1749; Last week 1641; Last year 1800.

This week in Lancaster County, slaughter steers sold steady to firm for the week. Demand conyinues to be good on a moderate supply of cattle. Slaughter cows sold 3.00-4.00 higher early in the week and leveled off later in the week to last Thursday's good market. Demand remains good on slaughter cows. Slaughter rates will increase this week due to the Labor Day holiday with approximately 630,000 head killed. The dollar weakened and this should increase beef exports. The box beef market remains strong this week due at least in part to this with the Choice cutouts closing at $196.00/cwt and Select closing at $185.00/cwt. Direct cattle trades in the Midwest have been inactive as of Thursday. Asking prices are at 125.00/cwt live, and bids are at 121.00/cwt. August live cattle futures lost strength on Thursday closing down .80/cwt at 123.35/cwt. All cattle markets are priced per cwt with exception of dairy cattle purchased on a per head basis.

All cattle markets are priced per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1245-1580 lbs 126.00-130.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1195-1560 lbs 120.00-126.50; SELECT 2-3: 1145-1385 lbs 116.00-121.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 1450-1625 lbs 107.00-111.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1500-1680 lbs 106.00-109.00; SELECT 2-3: 1450-1600 lbs 100.00-105.75.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: CHOICE 2-3: 1430-1550 lbs 117.50-120.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 79.50-86.00, Low dress 72.00-75.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 77.50-84.00, High dress 84.00-94.00, Low dress 75.00-77.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 77.50-83.00, High dress 83.00-89.00, Low dress 71.00-76.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 70.00-76.50, High dress 76.50-81.50, Low dress 62.00-70.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 905-2175 lbs 96.50-102.00, high dress 102.00-114.00, very high dress 119.00-130.00, low dress 84.00-95.00.

CALF SUMMARY: This week in Lancaster County, Holstein Bull calves sold mostly 20.00-30.00 higher with very good demand. Heifers traded steady to firm. The Composite Veal Carcass Values for the Northeast United States was quoted from 330.00-355.00/cwt this week, with a weighted average value of 338.96/cwt (Hide-off). All prices per cwt.

MONDAY: HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 95-115 lbs 135.00-155.00, 90 lbs 115.00-125.00; #2: 95-120 lbs 120.00-140.00, 80-90 lbs 90.00-110.00; #3: 95-115 lbs 90.00-115.00, 75-90 lbs 50.00-80.00; UTILITY: 60-115 lbs 30.00-50.00, 55-65 lbs 17.00-20.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 85-100 lbs 90.00-115.00; #2: 70-85 lbs 50.00-75.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 50-85 lbs 25.00-50.00.

TUESDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 121 lbs 141.00, 95-111 lbs 152.00-162.00, 85-90 lbs 117.00-132.00; #2: 112 lbs 147.00, 95-103 lbs 155.00-167.00, 84-90 lbs 115.00-140.00, 73 lbs 30.00; #3: 108 lbs 107.00, 94-95 lbs 130.00-132.00, 83 lbs 105.00, 73 lbs 32.00; UTILITY: 73-100 lbs 19.00-40.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 93-101 lbs 125.00-127.00, 81 lbs 82.00; #2: 91 lbs 102.00, 73-81 lbs 35.00-70.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 75-81 lbs 25.00-42.00, 63 lbs 15.00.

THURSDAY: GRADED BULL CALVES: #1: 80-128 lbs 137.00-143.00; #2: 120-128 lbs 110.00, 94-118 lbs 130.00-138.00; #3: 80-130 lbs 80.00-93.00, 72-78 lbs 40.00; UTILITY: 60-110 lbs 25.00-57.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 80-110 lbs 105.00-120.00; #2: 75-100 lbs 80.00-100.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 60-95 lbs 25.00-50.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Monday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 881, Last week 766, Last year 798. CALVES: 441, Last week 424, Last year 444.

Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00 higher with very good demand. Bulls traded steady with moderate demand. Cattle supply included 117 slaughter steers, 133 heifers, 296 cows, 161 bulls, and 59 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITES: 65-75% lean avg dress 79.50-86.00, low dress 72.00-72.50; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean avg dress 78.50-84.00, high dress 86.00-94.00, low dress 76.00-78.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean avg dress 78.00-81.00, high dress 82.50-89.00, low dress 71.00-75.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean avg dress 71.50-76.50, high dress 78.00-81.50, low dress 62.00-71.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 905-2175 lbs 96.50-102.00, high dress 102.00-114.00, very high dress 119.00-130.00, low dress 84.00-95.00.

CALVES: Compared to last Monday`s sale, Holstein bull calves sold 5.00-10.00 lower with moderate demand. Heifers traded steady to firm with light demand. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 95-115 lbs 135.00-155.00, 90 lbs 115.00-125.00; #2: 95-120 lbs 120.00-140.00, 80-90 lbs 90.00-110.00; #3: 95-115 lbs 90.00-115.00, 75-90 lbs 50.00-80.00; UTILITY: 60-115 lbs 30.00-50.00, 55-65 lbs 17.00-20.00

HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 85-100 lbs 90.00-115.00; #2: 70-85 lbs 50.00-75.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 50-85 lbs 25.00-50.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Vintage Sales Stables Monday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 186, Last week 234. CALVES: 133, Last week 118.

Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter steers sold steady with moderate demand. Slaughter cows were mostly steady. Cattle supply consisted of 105 steers, 18 heifers, 57 cows, 4 bulls, and 2 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1245-1580 lbs 127.00-129.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1195-1560 lbs 120.00-126.50; SELECT 2-3: 1145-1385 lbs 117.50-120.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEINS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 1450-1625 lbs 107.00-110.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: CHOICE 2-3: 1430-1550 lbs 117.50-120.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: BREAKERS: 75-80% lean avg dress 76.50-79.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean avg dress 69.50-74.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean avg dress 63.00-68.50.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week’s sale, bull calves sold 10.00-15.00 higher with moderate demand. All prices per cwt, all calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted.

HOLSTEINS BULL CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 115.00-132.00; #2: 90-110 lbs 100.00-110.00, 80-90 lbs 90.00-105.00; #3: 80-115 lbs 65.00-80.00; Utility: 60-90 lbs 25.00-50.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587.

NOTICE: Next feeder cattle sale Sept. 13.

Vintage Sales Stables Tuesday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Aug. 20, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 374, Last week 319, Last year 327. CALVES: 582, Last week 528, Last year 610.

Compared to last week: Slaughter Holsteins traded mostly steady. Demand was good. Slaughter cows mostly 3.00-4.00 higher on good demand. Slaughter cattle supplies consisted of 53 steers and heifers, 309 cows, 4 bulls, and 8 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1450-1600 lbs 109.50-111.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1500-1680 lbs 106.00-109.00; SELECT 1-3: 1450-1600 lbs 101.50-105.75.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 73.50-76.00, High dress 78.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 77.50-83.50, High dress 84.00-88.00, Low dress 75.00-77.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 77.50-83.00, High dress 87.00-88.00, Low dress 71.00-76.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 70.00-75.50, High dress 76.00-77.50, Low dress 63.50-69.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1000-1750 lbs avg dress 98.00, low dress 81.00-88.50.

CALVES: Compared to last Tuesday’s sale, Holstein Bull and Heifer calves sold 5.00-10.00 higher. Demand was good for all classes. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 461 head for Tuesday’s sale. All calves are sold by the cwt.

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 121 lbs 141.00, 95-111 lbs 152.00-162.00, 85-90 lbs 117.00-132.00; #2: 112 lbs 147.00, 95-103 lbs 155.00-167.00, 84-90 lbs 115.00-140.00, 73 lbs 30.00; #3: 108 lbs 107.00, 94-95 lbs 130.00-132.00, 83 lbs 105.00, 73 lbs 32.00; UTILITY: 73-100 lbs 19.00-40.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 93-101 lbs 125.00-127.00, 81 lbs 82.00; #2: 91 lbs 102.00, 73-81 lbs 35.00-70.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 75-81 lbs 25.00-42.00, 63 lbs 15.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTE: Next Feeder Sale Sept. 13.

New Holland Thursday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 22, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 881, Last week 818, Last year 1005. CALVES: 593, Last week 571, Last year 629.

A good run of quality steers offered this week. Steers sold firm compared to last week. Demand was good. Slaughter Holstein steers mostly 1.00-2.00 lower compared to last week. Slaughter heifers not tested. Slaughter cows sold firm with good demand. Cattle supplies included 358 slaughter steers; 68 heifers; 411 cows; 38 bulls; and 6 feeder calves. All prices per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1455-1600 lbs 126.00-130.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1325-1650 lbs 121.50-125.50; SELECT 2-3: 1350-1600 lbs 116.00-121.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1250-1450 lbs 109.00-111.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1290-1595 lbs 106.00-108.50; SELECT 1-3: 1175-1785 lbs 100.00-105.50.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 76.00-80.00, High dress 83.00-84.00, Low dress 70.00-75.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 80.00-84.50, High dress 85.00-86.50, Low dress 74.00-79.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 77.00-80.50, High dress 81.00-84.50, Low dress 70.00-76.50; LEAN: 88-90% lean, Avg dress 70.00-75.50, High dress 76.00-80.50, Low dress 65.00-69.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 915-1555 lbs avg dress 95.00-98.00, high dress 104.00-106.00, low dress 91.00-94.50.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: Graded bull calves sold mostly steady with good demand. Holstein heifer calves sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher with good demand. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 424 head for this Thursday's graded sale. One hundred percent supply Holstein calves unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

Graded Bull Calves: #1: 80-128 lbs 137.00-143.00; #2: 120-128 lbs 110.00, 94-118 lbs 130.00-138.00; #3: 80-130 lbs 80.00-93.00, 72-78 lbs 40.00; UTILITY: 60-110 lbs 25.00-57.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 80-110 lbs 105.00-120.00; #2: 75-100 lbs 80.00-100.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 60-95 lbs 25.00-50.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

VA Graded Feeder Cattle Summary
Richmond, Va.
Aug. 15, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

State Graded Weighted Average for Aug 8-14, 2013. Sales at Blackstone, Dublin, Lynchburg, Marshall, Radiant, Radiant CVCA, Rockingham, Springlake, Winchester and Wythe County.

Feeder Cattle: 6773 (Steers 3958; Heifers 2312; Bulls 503).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 27 head, 400-500 lbs 126.00-165.00; 252 head, 500-600 lbs 130.00-176.75; 784 head, 600-700 lbs 127.00-173.00; 775 head, 700-800 lbs 103.00-170.00; 843 head, 800-900 lbs 124.00-154.00; 234 head, 900-1000 lbs 105.00-137.75; 57 head, 1000-1100 lbs 100.00-128.00. MED 1: 7 head, 400-500 lbs 160.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 5 head, 400-500 lbs 161.00; 29 head, 500-600 lbs 161.50-162.50; 56 head, 600-700 lbs 163.00-167.50; 26 head, 700-800 lbs 140.00-147.75; 12 head, 800-900 lbs 140.00-142.00; 58 head, 900-1000 lbs 127.00-137.50. MED/LGE 2: 18 head, 300-400 lbs 145.00-184.50; 66 head, 400-500 lbs 142.00-167.00; 150 head, 500-600 lbs 110.00-158.50; 173 head, 600-700 lbs 125.00-155.00; 57 head, 700-800 lbs 128.00-147.50; 13 head, 800-900 lbs 94.00-140.50; 7 head, 900-1000 lbs 121.00-138.50. MED/LGE 2-3: 24 head, 700-800 lbs 135.25. MED/LGE 3: 4 head, 300-400 lbs 147.00-165.00; 30 head, 400-500 lbs 120.00-161.00; 52 head, 500-600 lbs 111.00-153.25; 39 head, 600-700 lbs 88.00-150.75; 10 head, 700-800 lbs 90.00-132.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 2: 48 head, 1000-1100 lbs 104.75. LGE 2-3: 10 head, 800-900 lbs 98.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 11 head, 300-400 lbs 130.00-187.50; 60 head, 400-500 lbs 134.00-169.75; 65 head, 500-600 lbs 126.00-143.50; 28 head, 600-700 lbs 119.50-128.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 5 head, 500-600 lbs 119.50; 11 head, 600-700 lbs 116.50-127.00. MED/LGE 2: 21 head, 300-400 lbs 145.00-192.50; 134 head, 400-500 lbs 134.00-170.00; 67 head, 500-600 lbs 106.00-141.50; 28 head, 600-700 lbs 116.00-134.50. MED/LGE 3: 6 head, 400-500 lbs 138.00-142.50; 6 head, 500-600 lbs 127.00-140.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 15 head, 300-400 lbs 115.00-156.00; 43 head, 400-500 lbs 119.00-146.75; 218 head, 500-600 lbs 125.00-145.25; 547 head, 600-700 lbs 105.00-154.00; 461 head, 700-800 lbs 109.00-151.00; 105 head, 800-900 lbs 106.00-129.50; 4 head, 900-1000 lbs 95.00-106.50. MED/LGE 1-2: 35 head, 500-600 lbs 131.00-139.00; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 129.50; 8 head, 700-800 lbs 128.00. MED/LGE 2: 34 head, 300-400 lbs 120.00-159.50; 138 head, 400-500 lbs 126.00-145.25; 218 head, 500-600 lbs 88.00-139.75; 153 head, 600-700 lbs 110.00-139.25; 63 head, 700-800 lbs 115.00-128.25; 17 head, 800-900 lbs 108.50-126.25. MED/LGE 3: 15 head, 300-400 lbs 125.00-151.00; 49 head, 400-500 lbs 89.00-142.75; 77 head, 500-600 lbs 101.00-136.25; 23 head, 600-700 lbs 117.00-131.25; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 83.00-117.00.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

New Holland Hog Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 1054; Last Week: 1078; Year Ago: 1168.

When compared to last week`s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 3.00-4.00 lower. Demand was moderate. Sows traded 3.00-4.00 lower on the lighter sows and steady on the heavier sows on moderate demand. All prices per cwt.

BARROWS/GILTS: 49-54% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 72.00-75.00, 300-400 lbs 73.00-75.50; 45-49% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 68.50-70.50, 300-400 lbs 68.00-71.50.

SOWS: US 1-3: 300-500 lbs 69.50-74.50, 500-700 lbs 77.00-79.00.

BOARS: 300-700 lbs 28.00.

Source: USDA Agricultural Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Feeder Pig Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 21, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 186; Last sale: 122.

When compared to the most recent sale 2 weeks ago, feeder pigs sold sharply higher, as much as 100.00/cwt higher in spots. Demand was very good on light supplies and a large buyer attendance. All feeder pigs are sold per cwt.

US 1: 29 head, 30-40 lbs 180.00-210.00; 12 head 40-50 lbs 150.00-190.00.

US 2: 6 head 10-20 lbs 400.00; 32 head 20-30 lbs 200.00-250.00; 67 head 50-70 lbs 100.00-120.00; 4 head 70-80 lbs 170.00; 8 head 80-90 lbs 105.00.

Source: USDA Market News, New Holland, PA Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Note: Next feeder pig sale will be Sept. 4.

New Holland Weekly Horse Sale
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by Auction

136 total head. Overall market steady. Prices per head.

Work: 335.00-600.00.

Driving: 425.00-600.00.

Riding: 150.00-385.00.

Better Riding: 525.00-1150.00.

Registered Riding: 785.00-1100.00.

Ponies: 200.00-335.00.

Large Ponies: 350.00-700.00.

Colts: 85.00-160.00.

Camp Horses: 385.00-1850.00.

New Holland Sheep & Goat Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Reports Supplied by USDA

SHEEP/LAMB RECEIPTS: 1649; Last Monday: 2109; Year Ago: 2532.

GOAT RECEIPTS: 1757; Last Monday: 1676; Year Ago: 2353.

Sheep/Lambs: When compared to last week, slaughter lambs sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Slaughter ewes traded firm. Demand was good for all classes. Slaughter supply consisted of 78 percent lambs, 17 percent slaughter ewes, and 5 percent miscellaneous stock. All sheep and lambs are destined for non-traditional markets. All sheep and lambs are sold by the hundred weight,on actual weights.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: NON-TRADITIONAL MARKETS: WOOLED/SHORN CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 40-50 lbs hair sheep 157.00-172.00, 50-70 lbs 142.00-162.00, 70-90 lbs 140.00-160.00, hair sheep 146.00-162.00, 90-130 lbs 144.00-160.00; CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 40-50 lbs 202.00-215.00, 50-60 lbs 195.00-260.00, 60-70 lbs 180.00-182.00; GOOD/CHOICE 1-3: 50-70 lbs hair sheep 120.00-144.00, 70-90 lbs 130.00-138.00, hair sheep 120.00-140.00, 90-110 lbs 120.00-140.00, 110-130 lbs 114.00-136.00, 130-150 lbs 115.00-128.00, 150-160 lbs 118.00-122.00; UTILITY/GOOD 1-2: 110-125 lbs 110.00-114.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: Medium Flesh 100-110 lbs hair sheep 72.00-84.00, 120-160 lbs 58.00-74.00, hair sheep 58.00-68.00, 160-200 lbs 60.00-72.00; UTILITY 1-2: Thin Flesh 110-160 lbs 40.00-62.00, hair sheep 46.00-62.00, 160-180 lbs 40.00-54.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS: 120-150 lbs 80.00-1.00, 130-150 lbs hair sheep 64.00-76.00, 180-250 lbs 46.00-76.00.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kid goats sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Slaughter Nanny goats sold mostly steady. Slaughter billies sold mostly 5.00-10.00 higher. Demand was good for all classes. Slaughter supply consisted of 49 percent Slaughter Kids, 37 percent Slaughter Nannies, and 14 percent bucks/billies and whethers. All Goats are sold by the head on estimated weights.

SLAUGHTER KIDS: SEL 1: 40-60 lbs 112.00-138.00, 60-80 lbs 130.00-180.00, 80-110 lbs 147.00-185.00; SEL 2: 40-60 lbs 92.00-112.00, 60-80 lbs 110.00-127.00, 80-110 lbs 120.00-137.00; SEL 3: 40-60 lbs 47.00-92.00, 60-80 lbs 62.00-106.00, 80-110 lbs 92.00-110.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES: SEL 1: 80-125 lbs 140.00-186.00, 130-150 lbs 150.00-182.00; SEL 2: 80-125 lbs 108.00-134.00, 130-150 lbs 104.00-130.00; SEL 3: 70-80 lbs 82.00-106.00, 80-120 lbs 62.00-94.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES: SEL 1: 130-150 lbs 212.00-240.00, 150-180 lbs 230.00-260.00; SEL 2: 100-150 lbs 135.00-198.00, 150-160 lbs 180.00-207.00; SEL 3: 110-150 lbs 102.00-134.00.

SLAUGHTER WHETHERS: SEL 1: 60-100 lbs 176.00-205.00, 100-140 lbs 216.00-280.00, 140-180 lbs 280.00-350.00; SEL 2: 70-100 lbs 135.00-177.00, 100-120 lbs 157.00-200.00; SEL 3: 75 lbs 125.00.

Source: USDA Dept. of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Smoker Graded Goat & Sheep Auction
Parkesburg, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

SHEEP: 217; Last sale 572.

GOATS: 124; Last sale 202.

A lighter supply of sheep and goats on offer compared to two weeks ago. Slaughter lamb and kid goats sold unevenly steady. Mature stock including ewes, nannies, and bucks sold firm. Demand was moderate. All goats are USDA graded and are co-mingled according to age, weight, sex, and selection grade. All sheep and goats are sold per cwt in their in-weights.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED & SHORN: CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 6 head, 40-50 lbs 175.00-188.00; 9 head, 60-70 lbs 176.00-182.00; 9 head, 80-90 lbs 120.00. CHOICE 2-3: 10 head, 40-50 lbs 158.00; 26 head, 50-60 lbs 134.00-144.00; 52 head, 60-70 lbs 122.00-130.00; 23 head, 70-80 lbs 108.00-115.00; 12 head, 80-90 lbs 105.00-115.00; 5 head, 90-110 lbs 115.00-120.00; 4 head, 110-130 lbs 115.00-116.00; 5 head, 130-150 lbs 110.00. GOOD/CHOICE 1-2: 10 head, 90-110 lbs 84.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: 8 head, 160-200 lbs 60.00-65.00. UTILITY 1-2: 18 head, 100-120 lbs 44.00 44.00 11 head, 120-160 lbs 46.00-47.00.

SLAUGHTER KIDS: SEL 1: 14 head, 40-50 lbs 175.00; 9 head, 50-60 lbs 182.00; 6 head, 80-90 lbs 144.00. SEL 2: 9 head, 40-50 lbs 165.00; 5 head, 50-60 lbs 170.00. SEL 3: 14 head, 40-50 lbs 155.00; 13 head, 50-60 lbs 155.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES: SEL 1: 5 head, 130-180 lbs 90.00. SEL 2: 6 head, 130-180 lbs 100.00-110.00. SEL 3: 5 head, 80-130 lbs 95.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES: SEL 3: 6 head, 100-150 lbs 105.00-112.00.

SLAUGHTER WHETHERS: SEL 1: 4 head, 70-80 lbs 178.00.

Source: USDA Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350.

NOTE: Next graded goat sale Sept. 6.

New Holland Weekly Dairy Sale
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 21, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 206; Last Sale: 451; Last Year: 268.

Compared to last week, dairy cows sold 100.00-200.00 lower. Demand was good. Bred Holstein heifers sold 100.00-200.00 lower. Demand was good. Wednesday’s supply included 72 fresh milking cows, 32 short-bred cows, 11 springing cows, 26 short-bred heifers, 24 springing heifers, 24 open heifers, and 14 bulls. One hundred percent of reported supply Holsteins unless otherwise noted. All sales sold on a per head basis.

FRESH COWS: Supreme: 1600.00-1950.00; Approved: 1425.00-1550.00; Medium: 1150.00-1350.00; Common: 900.00-1050.00;

SPRINGING COWS (7-9 months): Supreme: 1400.00-1450.00; Approved: 1175.00-1200.00; Common: 800.00-950.00.

CULL COWS: 450.00-1200.00.

SHORT BRED HEIFERS (1-3 months): Supreme: 1200.00-1225.00; Approved: 1100.00-1175.00; Medium: 950.00-1000.00.

BRED HEIFERS (4-6 months): Approved: 1200.00-1300.00; Medium: 1050.00-1150.00.

SPRINGING HEIFERS (7-9 months): Supreme: 1450.00-1525.00; Approved: 1250.00-1425.00; Medium: 1050.00-1175.00; Common: 750.00-900.00.

OPEN HEIFERS: 300-600 LBS: Approved: 350.00-375.00. 600-900 LBS: Approved: 675.00-685.00; Medium: 525.00-575.00. 900-1200 LBS: Approved: 835.00-925.00. 1200-1500 LBS: Approved: 1025.00-1050.00.

BULLS: 300-600 lbs 400.00-500.00; 600-900 lbs 675.00, Jersey/ Crossbred 775.00; 900-1200 lbs 950.00-1050.00. 1200-1500 lbs 1225.00-1475.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Dairy Product Price Highlights
Washington, D. C.
Aug. 21, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

BUTTER prices received for 25 kilogram and 68 pound boxes meeting United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Grade AA standards averaged $1.44 per pound for the week ending August 17, 2013. The United States (US) price per pound decreased 1.6 cents from the previous week.

CHEDDAR CHEESE prices received for US 40 pound blocks averaged $1.76 per pound for the week ending August 17, 2013. The price per pound increased 3.2 cents from the previous week. The price for US 500 pound barrels adjusted to 38 percent moisture averaged $1.80 per pound, up 3.1 cents from the previous week.

DRY WHEY prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade standards averaged 57.6 cents per pound for the week ending August 17, 2013. The US price per pound increased 0.2 cents from the previous week.

NONFAT DRY MILK prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade or United States Public Health Service (USPHS) Grade A standards averaged $1.77 per pound for the week ending August 17, 2013. The US price per pound increased 0.6 cents from the previous week.

East Fluid Milk & Cream Review
Madison, Wis.
Aug. 21, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Fluid cream and condensed skim prices in tanklot quantities: spot prices of class II cream, dollars per lb. Butterfat: F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast 1.7174-1.9806.

Prices of condensed skim, dollars per lb. solids, F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast - Class II - includes monthly formula prices 1.76-1.83. Northeast - Class III - spot prices 1.53-1.59.

Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of FLORIDA: THIS WK: In 212, Out 0; LAST WK: In 73, Out 0; LAST YR: In 72, Out 0. Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of other SOUTHEASTERN STATES: 0.

Milk production remains above seasonal levels and adding to manufacturing milk supplies in the Northeast region. Manufacturing milk supplies in the Mid-Atlantic region are being reduced as increased Class I demand in the Southeast is pulling supplies out of the region. Continuing cool, dry weather over both regions has increased hay harvest activities. A majority of crops in the two regions are rated good to excellent. Milk production in Florida continues to decline with the typical seasonal low point still a few weeks out. Nearly all schools are back in session and Class I demand is very strong. Retail fluid milk promotions are also contributing to the increase in fluid demand. Rains have been plentiful in the state with some areas too wet for field work. Pastures are rated as 84% good to excellent.

Florida imported 212 spot loads of milk this week, which is the highest number of import loads since August of 2006. Class I demand is also strong in the Southeast region with nearly all supplies going to fill fluid needs. Manufacturing milk supplies, for all practical purposes, have been reduced to contract minimums. Milk production continues to decline in the region along the seasonal trend. Milk production and butterfat remain above year ago levels, making cream supplies readily available in the East with some loads having trouble finding a home. Cream demand is beginning to wane from ice cream manufacturers, though demand from cream cheese makers remains good.

Cream multiples for all Classes were in a wide range this week, 1.24-1.43, and depended on location and date of purchase. The current cost per butterfat pound is 60-70 cents below year ago levels, primarily due to the lower butter market, which averaged $1.3850 last week compared to $1.7775 a year ago.

Condensed skim supplies have increased as cool weather has improved cow comfort levels and milk production. Most supplies are moving through contracts with light spot sale activity. Those looking for spot loads are not finding many deals as most balancing plants are comfortable making nonfat dry milk, given the current market.

rick.whipp@ams.usda.gov

U.S. Milk Production Update
Washington, D.C.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

July Milk Production up 1.2%

Milk production in the 23 major States during July totaled 15.7 billion pounds, up 1.2 percent from July 2012. June revised production, at 15.8 billion pounds, was up 1.7 percent from June 2012. The June revision represented an increase of 1 million pounds or less than 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate.

Released Aug. 19, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Note: Due to sequestration, administrative data will be used for all releases of this report through the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30. Releases will contain milk production data only. No information on the number of cows or milk per cow will be released. Please check the NASS website at nass.usda.gov for any future updates on NASS programs.

Average Farm Feed Costs for Handy Reference
Ephrata, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

To provide farmers across the state with a handy reference of commodity input costs in their feeding operations for DHIA record sheets or to develop livestock feed cost data, here are last week’s average costs of various ingredients as compiled from regional reports across the state of Pennsylvania.

Remember, these are averages, so you will need to adjust your figures up or down according to your location and the quality of your crop.

CORN, No. 2: 5.90 bu, 10.57 cwt.

WHEAT, No. 2: 6.18 bu, 10.33 cwt.

BARLEY, No. 3: 3.40 bu, 7.28 cwt.

OATS, No. 2: 3.43 bu, 10.71 cwt.

SOYBEANS, No. 2: 13.27 bu, 22.16 cwt.

EAR CORN: 172.67 ton, 8.63 cwt.

ALFALFA HAY: 248.75 ton, 12.44 cwt.

MIXED HAY: 215.00 ton, 10.75 cwt.

TIMOTHY HAY: 137.50 ton, 6.88 cwt.

PA Grain Report
New Holland, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

When compared to last week’s cash bids; basis have narrowed in the grain and bean markets. Corn was steady to weak, while the bean market advanced around 70 cents per bushel from last week’s opening bids. Futures traded higher across the board on Monday as the market gained support from a warmer and drier short-term weather forecast across the corn-belt. Lagging maturity from the late planting season has kept the market volatile on weather concerns. Concerns of early frost may also play into the market in the coming months as we transition into fall. As of now, USDA downgraded the corn and soybean crops in its latest crop progress report released on Monday. The corn crop was dropped 3 percentage points and was rated at 61% in good to excellent condition, 26% in fair condition, and 13% in poor to very poor condition. Beans were downgraded 2 percentage points with 62% good to excellent, 28% fair, and 10% poor to very poor. Of the 18 major production states Pennsylvania was ranked in crop conditions, falling right on the heels of Kentucky. Both states corn crops were ranked as 88% in good to excellent condition. Other states having an outstanding growing year include Tennessee and Kentucky, with corn condition in 87% and 82% good to excellent condition respectively. All grain and soybean prices are quoted per bushel delivered to the mill or elevator. Bases reflect last Friday’s CME close against Monday morning’s cash bids.

US No 2 Yellow Corn: EASTERN: 5.7000-6.2400, dn 10-dn 1, 96U to 150U, dn 18-dn 9; CENTRAL: 5.4500-6.2500, dn 5-unch, 71U to 151U, dn 13-dn 8; WESTERN: 5.4000-6.0000, dn 7-dn 20, 66U to 126U, dn 15-dn 28.

US No 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat: EASTERN: 6.0750-6.7600, dn 22.5-dn 3, -34U to 34.5U, dn 31-dn 11.5; CENTRAL: 6.0000-6.7150, unch-dn 3.5, -41.5U to 30U, dn 8.5-dn 12; WESTERN: 5.6600-5.9150, up 10-up 8.5, -75.5U to -50U, up 1.5-unch.

US No 3 Feed Barley: EASTERN: 3.0000-3.5000, dn 50-dn 20; CENTRAL: 3.2000-3.7000, dn 40-dn 30; WESTERN: n/a.

US No 2 White Oats: EASTERN: 3.2000-3.5000, dn 20-unch, -65U to -35U, dn 46-dn 26; CENTRAL: 3.2000-3.8000, dn 5, -65U to -5U, dn 31; WESTERN: 3.5000, unch-dn 10, -35U, dn 26-dn 36.

US No 2 Soybeans: EASTERN: 12.5900-13.8000, up 77-up 98, -63U to 58U, dn 27-dn 6; CENTRAL: 12.8000-13.6400, up 70-up 54, -42U to 42U, dn 34-dn 50; WESTERN: n/a.

Average Bid Price: EASTERN: Corn: 6.01; Wheat: 6.52; Barley: 3.30; Oats: 3.30; Soybeans: 13.25. CENTRAL: Corn: 5.93; Wheat: 6.24; Barley: 3.50; Oats: 3.50; Soybeans: 13.29. WESTERN: Corn: 5.77; Wheat: 5.79; Barley: n/a; Oats: 3.50; Soybeans: n/a.

Eastern Contracts: CORN: 4.3900-4.7300, up 4-up 10, -24.5z to 9.5z, dn 6.5-dn 0.5; WHEAT: 6.1400-6.6100, No Comp, -39.5z to 7.5z, No Comp; SOYBEANS: 12.1100-12.6800, up 55-up, 112 -92x to -35x, dn 66-dn 9.

Source: USDA Market News Service, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-354-2391.

PA Regional Hay
Lewisburg, Pa.
Aug. 19, 2013
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Dealer Hay & Straw Market for Eastern, Pa.: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and per ton. All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and per ton. Compared to last week, hay sold .15 to .50 higher and straw sold .10 to .50 higher. ALFALFA: 130.00-185.00. MIXED: 90.00-185.00. TIMOTHY: 90.00-160.00. STRAW: 90.00-140.00. MULCH: 50.00.

Summary of Lancaster Area Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 110 loads. Straw: 27 loads. ALFALFA: 110.00-510.00. MIXED: 60.00-480.00. TIMOTHY: 40.00-240.00. GRASS: 40.00-270.00. STRAW: 70.00-235.00.

Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 52 loads; Straw: 14 loads. ALFALFA: 115.00-260.00. MIXED: 75.00-245.00. TIMOTHY: 110.00-180.00. GRASS: 60.00-180.00. STRAW: 70.00-150.00.

Source: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

PA Mushrooms
Washington, D.C.
Aug. 20, 2013
Report Supplied by NASS-Pa.

Pennsylvania’s 63 Agaricus growers led all states by producing 547.0 million pounds, or 62 percent of all U.S. Agaricus mushrooms sold during the 2012-2013 growing season. Second-ranked California contributed 13 percent. This is a slight decrease from 2012’s 547.9 million pounds. Pennsylvania growers received, on average, 93.4 cents per pound for all Agaricus mushroom sales up 2.7 cents from the previous year. Pennsylvania’s Agaricus crop was valued at $510.9 million, up 3 percent from the 2011-2012 crop.

The Commonwealth mushroom producers sold 452.7 million pounds of Agaricus mushrooms for fresh market. Fresh market sales tallied $452.7 million. In addition, Pennsylvania growers supplied 94.3 million pounds of Agaricus mushrooms sold in the U.S. for processing. Processing sales in Pennsylvania totaled $58.3 million for the 2012-2013 season. Prices and value for mushroom sales are based on the average price that the producer receives at the point of first sale.

The 53 growers of Agaricus mushrooms in Chester County, Pennsylvania produced 384 million pounds, decrease of 4 percent compared to the 2011-2012 growing season. This production was valued at 361 million dollars, down 1 percent from last season. The growing area in Chester County was 11.8 million square feet, down 5 percent from the previous growing season. Total fillings were 56.6 million square feet, down 7 percent from the 2011-2012 growing season.

Honey Monthly Update
Washington, D.C.
Aug. 20, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Colony, Honey Plant & Market Conditions During July 2013

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD, PA, VA, WV): For the most part, colonies are healthy throughout the District. There are very few reports of disease or mite problems. The weather for July saw extreme highs with high humidity, almost record setting, followed by temperatures 5-10 degrees below normal and low humidity as the month waned. Moisture levels throughout the District varied as well. Some areas, such as the southeast section of the District, received substantial rainfall and levels are 10-15 inches higher than normal, while other parts saw sporadic rain and were actually quite dry. Colonies that survived the winter have built up nicely and are reporting surplus honey; however, colonies that were weak or new are in need of honey. These colonies, depending on their location, missed the main nectar flow due to either rain, early bloom, or late arrival of packages and have been slow to build up. As per normal, there was a dirth of nectar during July, except in the wetter areas of the District, and beekeepers are supplying supplemental food to these colonies and will have to continue to do so during August. This shortage of honey is unusual as normally colonies have plenty of honey stored during these short nectar months. Beekeepers are hoping for a good aster and goldenrod bloom during the fall to alleviate the lack of honey stores.

NEW ENGLAND: New England weather in July mostly had average temperatures, generally above normal combined with high humidity throughout the month. Early on in the month the region experienced consistently heavy rain patterns and what looked like a seemingly drought condition abruptly came to an end. Precipitation and soil moisture levels were above average and holding steady with ample pollen and many nectar sources starting to slow and end quickly. New England has experienced hot daytime temperatures in the high 80s and mid-90s.

There seems to be a pattern where bees are bringing in small amounts of nectar and pollen early in the day. Keepers report that many bees are hanging outside the hives in order to escape the heat while others line up with their backs toward the entrance and fan their wings to create a cooling air flow through the hive. Many hives have bees clustered on the front of the hive with many hives bearding. This indicates that the bees are not out foraging and are opportunistic to any easy nectar source because of their tendency to swarm to the nearest nectar source. Regionally, we are starting a nectar dearth, so keepers reportedly are watching for administering syrup feedings if necessary. The bees are finding it hard to find nectar with so much heat and humidity. Additionally, many bees are by the water sources as well, which is customary for this time of season and weather pattern. Bees are putting what they are bringing inside the hive into brood production.

It currently appears that this season’s main honey flow is practically over. It was an interesting honey flow progression this year for New England. Some excellent pollen and nectar sources for bees are the legumes such as alsike clover (Trifolium hybridum), purple vetch (Vicia sativa), birds foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and clovers such as white sweet clover (Melilotus alba) and yellow sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis) which are all in full bloom at this point in time. Additionally with many unanticipated feeding sources available, this could be one of the most interesting honey crop years regarding sourced varieties in New England. The honey flow has dramatically slowed as nectar becomes scarce and brood rearing slows down. However, there is still a large population of bees. Honey flows have been good in strong colonies however currently, honey production has been limited, - first too much rain and now too high in temperatures. Both weather conditions directly impact a plant’s ability to provide nectar and pollen.

Early commercial crop pollination services involved cranberries with pollination fees ranging from $75.00 to $125.00 mostly $90.00 per hive colony depending on transportation cost requirements. Additionally, some keepers that offer pollination services are only now moving bees for summer pollination of squash, cucumbers and pumpkins. Commercial keepers and queen producers have received many requests for queens from other keepers for splitting hives and requeening relative to replacing second year queens. Many commercialists have moved from building colonies and increasing the number of hives, to consolidating the weaker colonies and selecting their best queens as they begin early preparation for winter. Early harvested honey reportedly was some of the highest quality and lightly colored ever. Harvested honey has been averaging 35 lbs. per colony. Beekeepers have been busy concentrating on extracting honey. The Italian and Russian honeybees have reportedly been the best honey producers with keepers that have been successful with strong honey production numbers. New England needs some milder weather in order to start the August nectar flow.

For the most part, colonies were reported to be good condition as colony strength and health is generally very good. Mites are below normal levels, in part as a result of three heat waves this year. Tracheal and varroa mites are typically a problem in July and August. Mites cannot stand the heat as well as the honeybee. Additionally, other diseases such as chalkbrood and foulbrood do not appear to be a problem for bees. Regionally speaking, demand at all retail/wholesale outlets remains strong and honey sales remain unchanged. Prices quoted for retail 1lb bottled units were quoted at $7.00 to $11.00 mostly $10.00 and occasionally higher inclusive of all varieties; for food service operations prices were steady with 5 gallon units selling at $185.00 to $225.00 mostly $220.00 occasionally higher for both dark and light, raw and natural honey depending on variety and quality.

NEW YORK: Summer honey flows and yields in Western and Central New York have been exceptional; perhaps the best in many years. Basswood trees particularly yielded healthy with a very light high quality honey. Other forage sources have included soybeans, sweet clovers and alfalfa the latter half of the month. General hive health appears good, with the exception of unexpected queen losses, or disappearances. Cooler July temperatures have been a respite from the unusually high temperatures July can bring. There has been ample rain and with the cool nighttime temperatures and fall flowers are expected to develop and provide a bumper flow of nectar for bees and honey stores. Mite levels have remained just below the treatment threshold at this time, but expected to rise in the coming months. Overall, some beekeepers have reported the number of bees and hives are down markedly and expect chemical residue as a primary concern for the reduction in force. Worker bees have continued to work the hive in absence of AWOL queens.

OHIO: July weather has been a roller coaster - lots of rain, hot temperatures, below normal temperatures, more showers! Despite light blooms, bees have made more honey stores in Northern Ohio than expected. White and sweet clover provided little nectar for bees this month. Varroa mite counts have been low, although with the fast build-up this spring, bee swarms have been more prevalent. Currently, there is little bloom for bees foraging activities; however, with the wet July, beekeepers are optimistic that goldenrod will provide an excellent source of nectar in the weeks ahead. Local honey prices have been strong, and local fairs have been selling varietal honey for $9.00 pound. A plentiful locust and linden crop has seen these specialty honeys selling for $12.00 pound retail, with exotic varietals such as blueberry and cranberry bringing more than $12.00. Local honey supplies seem to be currently plentiful.

Source: www.marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv or www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/fvmhoney.pdf.

U.S. Mushrooms
Washington, D.C.
Aug. 20, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Sales Exceed $1 Billion for Third Season

Sales of the 2012-2013 United States mushroom crop totaled 896 million pounds, down slightly from last season. Value of sales for the 2012-2013 United States mushroom crop is $1.11 billion, up 1 percent from the previous season. The number of growers, at 298, is up 17 from last season. The average price is $1.24 per pound, up 2 cents from a year ago.

Released August 20, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

U.S. Livestock, Dairy & Poultry Outlook
Washington, D. C.
Aug. 16, 2013
Reports supplied by USDA/ERS

Meat, Poultry Forecast Increases Year Over Year

BEEF/CATTLE: Higher year-over-year commercial cow slaughter for the first 6 months of 2013 sets the stage for lower 2014 cow inventories, calf crops, and feeder cattle inventories. Impacts from Tyson’s suspension of purchases of cattle fed Zilmax may have only minimal effects on beef production.

BEEF/CATTLE TRADE: The forecast for beef exports in 2013 was increased to 2.36 billion pounds due to higher exports during the second quarter. Beef imports totaled 192 million pounds in June 2013, a decline of 10 percent from the previous year. U.S. cattle imports continued to fall in June and are expected to decline to 1.95 million head in 2013, down 15 percent year over year.

PORK/HOGS: U.S. consumers paid slightly higher pork prices at retail in the first half of 2013, despite greater available domestic supplies of pork. Third-quarter retail pork prices are expected to be lower year over year as forecast prices of chicken moderate. Expected year-over-year higher third-quarter hog prices and lower feed costs should benefit pork producers, most of whom experienced negative returns in the first half of 2013.

POULTRY: Lower anticipated feed prices are expected to help boost production of broiler meat, table eggs, and broiler-type hatching eggs in the second half of 2013 and into 2014. Turkey production is expected to be lower in the second half of 2013 as higher stocks of whole birds and lower prices have caused turkey producers to reduce poult stockings to levels well below the previous year.

POULTRY TRADE: Broiler, turkey, egg, and egg products shipments in June were up from a year ago. Broiler shipments totaled 639.1 million pounds in June 2013, an increase of 4 percent from a year earlier. Turkey shipments increased 8.5 percent from a year ago, totaling 63.7 million pounds, while egg exports totaled 33.6 million dozen in June 2013, a 33-percent increase from last June.

DAIRY: The August milk production forecast is raised fractionally for 2013 and is unchanged for 2014. Ending stocks on a fat basis are lowered slightly from July as lower butter prices boost use. The price forecasts for butter for both 2013 and 2014 are lowered, while the 2013 and 2014 price forecast is raised for nonfat dry milk. The 2013 cheese price forecast is raised but unchanged for 2014. The whey price forecast is unchanged.

Source: Kenneth Mathews kmathewsers.usda.gov

U.S. Turkeys
Washington, D.C.
Aug. 15, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Eggs in Incubators Down 4%: Turkey eggs in incubators on August 1, 2013, in the United States totaled 27.7 million, down 4 percent from August 1, 2012. Eggs in incubators were up 1 percent from the July 1, 2013 total of 27.5 million eggs.

Poults Hatched During July Down 9%: Turkey poults hatched during July 2013, in the United States totaled 23.8 million, down 9 percent from July 2012. Poults hatched were up 13 percent from the June 2013 total of 21.2 million poults.

Net Poults Placed During July Down 11%: The 23.5 million net poults placed during July 2013 in the United States were down 11 percent from the number placed during the same month a year earlier. Net placements were up 12 percent from the June 2013 total of 21.0 million.

Released August 15, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Apple Processing Report
Fresno, Calif.
Aug. 15, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Utilized for Processing in 1 ton Units in Appalachian District

JUICE APPLES: Week ending 7/20: 146; Week ending 7/27: 205; Week ending 8/3: 210; Week ending 8/10: 241; 2012 to date: 55909; 2011 to date: 62576; Final 2011: 62576.

CANNER APPLES: Week ending 7/20: 1567; Week ending 7/27: 2042; Week ending 8/3: 1964; Week ending 8/10: 1864; 2012 to date: 204231; 2011 to date: 209853; Final 2011: 209853.

TOTAL APPLES: Week ending 7/20: 1713; Week ending 7/27: 2247; Week ending 8/3: 2174; Week ending 8/10: 2105; 2012 to date: 260140; 2011 to date: 272429; Final 2011: 272429.

Trading

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT(VA, WV, MD, PA): Current week temperatures remained cooler than normal during days and night with low humidity. A few growers have begun to harvest early season varieties of Rambos and Gingergolds. Harvest is running about 1-2 weeks behind normal this season.

Apple Juice Concentrate Imports

APPLE JUICE CONCENTRATE IMPORTS - PORTS OF ENTRY EAST COAST: Prices for apple juice concentrate for the period August 8 - 14, 2013. Acidity 1.0-2.2 percent weight/weight as malic acid, color 40-70 percent, brix minimum of 70.0, various containers (drums, bins, or bulk liquid packaging). Sales Ex Doc, excludes freight charges, all duties paid, containers included unless otherwise stated. Prices offered to importers per gallon basis in U.S. Dollars. China $8.00-8.40 mostly $8.20-8.25.

Shipping Point Trends

CHILE: Imports 141-124-304 Imports via boat. Movement expected to decrease slightly. PORT OF ENTRY: PHILADELPHIA AREA. Trading moderate. Prices generally unchanged. 18 kilogram cartons tray pack Fuji 64-80s 36.00-38.00, 90s 34.00-36.00, 100s 32.00, 110s mostly 30.00, 120s mostly 28.00; Granny Smith 70-100s 26.00-28.00, 110s mostly 24.00; Royal Gala 70-80s 36.00-38.00, 90s 34.00-36.00, 100s 26.00-28.00, 110s 22.00-24.00, 120s 20.00-22.00; Braeburn 64s mostly 28.00, 70-80s 28.00-30.00, 90s mostly 28.00, 100s mostly 26.00; Pink Lady/Cripps Pink 64-80s 26.00-28.00, 90s mostly 24.00, 100s 24.00-26.00, 110s 20.00-22.00, 120s 16.00-18.00. Quality good.

NEW YORK: Shipments 0-2-2 Movement expected to increase during the next two weeks as more growers harvest early varieties. Too few open market sales to establish a market. First F.O.B is expected to begin the week of (August 18).

NEW ENGLAND: Shipments 0-0-0 Movement expected to begin within the next two weeks as light harvest of early varieties is expected to begin the week of (August 18). Too few open market sales to establish a market.

MICHIGAN: Shipments very light Movement expected to remain light current week, increase following week with beginning of Paula Red harvest. Initial color and size appear to be above average for early fruit. Light supplies being diverted to local markets and farm stands.

NOTE: For a complete national report, visit marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv, or call 559-487-5178.


Should states be allowed to pass GMO labeling laws?

  • Yes
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12/18/2014 | Last Updated: 7:00 PM