Market Reports for Feb. 16, 2013

2/16/2013 7:00 AM

Average Farm Feed Costs for Handy Reference
Ephrata, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

To provide farmers across the state with a handy reference of commodity input costs in their feeding operations for DHIA record sheets or to develop livestock feed cost data, here are last week’s average costs of various ingredients as compiled from regional reports across the state of Pennsylvania.

Remember, these are averages, so you will need to adjust your figures up or down according to your location and the quality of your crop.

CORN, No. 2: 7.20 bu, 12.89 cwt.

WHEAT, No. 2: 7.55 bu, 12.60 cwt.

BARLEY, No. 3: 4.94 bu, 10.58 cwt.

OATS, No. 2: 4.38 bu, 13.68 cwt.

SOYBEANS, No. 2: 14.10 bu, 23.54 cwt.

EAR CORN: 203.67 ton, 10.18 cwt.

ALFALFA HAY: 206.25 ton, 10.31 cwt.

MIXED HAY: 223.75 ton, 11.19 cwt.

TIMOTHY HAY: 198.13 ton, 9.91 cwt.

PA Grain Report
Lewisburg, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Compared to last week, corn sold mostly .20 lower, wheat sold mostly steady, barley sold mostly .10 higher, oats sold mostly .10 to .20 higher and soybeans sold mostly .05 to .10 higher. Ear corn sold steady. All prices per bushel except ear corn is per ton.

Southeastern Pennsylvania: CORN #2: 7.19-7.60, avg 7.34, contracts Dec 5.61-5.83. WHEAT #2: 7.36-8.46, avg 7.99, contracts Dec 7.14-7.52. BARLEY #3: 4.80-5.80, avg 5.30, contracts Jul 5.70. OATS #2: 4.90, avg 4.90. SOYBEANS #2: 14.03-14.33, avg 14.24, contracts Dec 12.00-12.47. EAR CORN: 206.00, avg 206.00.

Central Pennsylvania: CORN #2: 7.00-7.55, avg 7.31. BARLEY #3: 5.15, avg 5.15. OATS #2: 4.50, avg 4.50. SOYBEANS #2: 14.00-14.17, avg 14.09. EAR CORN: 215.00, avg 215.00.

Southcentral Pennsylvania: CORN #2: 6.90-7.40, avg 7.14. WHEAT #2: 6.85-7.90, avg 7.37. BARLEY #3: 4.00-5.00, avg 4.38. OATS #2: 3.65-4.00, avg 3.82. SOYBEANS #2: 13.50-14.90, avg 14.09. EAR CORN: 180.00-200.00, avg 190.00.

Lehigh Valley Area: CORN #2: 7.10-7.60, avg 7.41. WHEAT #2: 8.35, avg 8.35. BARLEY #3: 5.75, avg 5.75. OATS #2: 4.40-4.50, avg 4.45. SOYBEAN #2: 13.93-14.00, avg 13.97. GR. SORGHUM: 7.70, avg 7.70.

Eastern & Central PA Summary: CORN #2: 6.90-7.60, avg 7.32, month ago 7.29, year ago 7.07. WHEAT #2: 6.85-8.46, avg 7.89, month ago 8.73, year ago 8.15. BARLEY #3: 4.80-5.75, avg 4.95, month ago 5.05, year ago 4.28. OATS #2: 3.60-4.90, avg 4.32, month ago 4.09, year ago 2.84. SOYBEANS #2: 13.50-14.90, avg 14.12, month ago 13.62, year ago 13.59. EAR CORN: 180.00-206.00, avg 210.00, month ago 200.50, year ago 156.25.

Western Pennsylvania: CORN #2: 6.86-7.50, avg 7.14. WHEAT #2: 7.22-7.60, avg 7.41. OATS #2: 3.85-5.25, avg 4.36. SOYBEANS #2: 14.05, avg 14.05.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

PA Regional Hay
Lewisburg, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Dealer Hay & Straw Market for Eastern, Pa.: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and per ton. Compared to last week, hay and straw sold steady. All hay and straw reported sold per ton. ALFALFA: 130.00-300.00. MIXED: 120.00-300.00. TIMOTHY: 120.00-235.00. STRAW: 100.00-160.00. MULCH: 50.00.

Summary of Lancaster Area Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 144 loads. Straw: 30 loads. ALFALFA: 125.00-300.00. MIXED: 120.00-375.00. TIMOTHY: 120.00-320.00. GRASS: 125.00-280.00. STRAW: 95.00-190.00.

Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: All prices per ton. Hay: 144 loads; Straw: 30 loads. ALFALFA: 100.00-280.00. MIXED: 80.00-320.00. TIMOTHY: 77.50-275.00. GRASS: 70.00-310.00. STRAW: 75.00-220.00.

Source: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Market at a Glance
Lancaster County Livestock Auction Averages
Prices Per Hundredweight
February 15, 2013
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

STEERS, CHOICE 2-3: This week 125.80; Last week 127.30; Last year 124.00.

HOLSTEIN STEERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 107.55; Last week 109.10; Last year 108.00.

HEIFERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 121.40; Last week 125.25; Last year 122.75.

COWS, BREAKERS, 75-80% LEAN: This week 77.30; Last week 77.25; Last year 80.15.

COWS, BONERS, 80-85% LEAN: This week 76.55; Last week 76.25; Last year 76.50.

BULLS, YG 1: This week 92.15; Last week 91.90; Last year 102.00.

HOGS, 49-54% LEAN, MONDAY: This week 68.50; Last week 67.50; Last year 67.75.

LAMBS, CHOICE/PRIME 80-110 lb: This week 170.50; Last week 148.00; Last year 215.00.

BULL CALVES, #1: This week 147.25; Last week 132.15.

KID GOATS, Selection 1 (head): This week 141.50; Last week 168.50.

PA Weekly Livestock Trends
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 8, 2013
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Combined Livestock Receipts from New Holland, Vintage, Dewart, Middleburg, Greencastle, Lebanon Valley and Waynesburg.

CATTLE: This week 3520; Last week 3251; Last year 5049. CALVES: This week 2853; Last week 2873; Last year 3160. HOGS: This week 1215; Last week 1060; Last year 1175. FEEDER PIGS: This week 516; Last week n/a; Last year n/a. LAMBS/SHEEP: This week 1694; Last week 1634; Last year 1251. GOATS: This week 717; Last week 1191; Last year 1600.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Compared to last week`s markets, slaughter steers sold mostly steady. Slaughter holsteins sold mostly 2.00 to 4.00 lower. Slaughter heifers sold mostly steady to firm. Slaughter cows sold mostly 3.00 to 4.00 higher. Slaughter bulls sold mostly 2.00 to 4.00 lower.

FEEDER CATTLE: No trend available.

HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week, holstein bull calves and holstein heifers sold mostly 3.00 to 5.00 lower. HOGS: Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 2.00 to 3.00 higher. Sows sold mostly steady.

SLAUGHTER SHEEP: Compared to last week, Slaughter lambs sold mostly 10.00 to 20.00 higher. Slaughter ewes sold mostly 10.00 to 20.00 higher.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: Compared to last week, kid goats sold mostly 10.00 to 20.00 higher. Nanny goats sold 20.00 to 30.00 higher. Slaughter billies sold mostly steady to 10.00 higher.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Lancaster County Weekly Cattle
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 15, 2013
Report Supplied By USDA

CATTLE: 2828; Last week 2525; Last year 2654. CALVES: 1692; Last week 1779; Last year 1771.

This week in Lancaster County, slaughter steers traded 1.00-2.00 lower with light demand. Supplies were light this week. After holding firm for three weeks, our local markets have finally succumbed to a lower cash trade across the major feeding regions of the Midwest. Cattle buyers have shown little interest in purchasing any additional cattle for the week than what was needed.

As for the Midwest, a moderate trade was reported on Thursday at 123.00/cwt Live, 1.00-2.00 lower than last week’s trade. Despite feedlots offering 19,000 less head on the Show List, beef processors came into the week well bought from last week’s trade and were able to negotiate a lower trade. For such a bullish outlook for 2013, the cattle market is off to a slow start. The supply factor is no doubt “bullish,” but beef values have out priced the consumer’s palate. As a result, consumers have either ate less beef, transitioned to cheaper beef options or opted for less expensive alternatives i.e. pork and poultry.

There are growing pains associated with higher prices, and until elevated beef values settle in as a norm, demand will suffer.

On the plus side, boxed beef values have stalled their descent and have managed to recover some value this week. Choice cutout values hit their lowest point of the year last Friday at 182.12/cwt, and has since gained 1.41/cwt to close at 183.53/cwt as of Thursday. The Choice/Select spread remains narrow at 3.93/cwt.

Cattle futures continue to decline as futures are pulled down to the reality of the cash trade. CME April Live Cattle futures closed at 129.775/cwt on Thursday, 0.35/cwt lower than last Friday`s close. March Feeder cattle contracts declined 1.975/cwt since last Friday to Thursday’s close of 146.225/cwt. CME corn also followed suite, breaking below the 7.00/bu mark and closing at 6.9575/bu on Thursday.

Thus far corn prices have rationed usage and slowed exports, but the weakness in the market is weighing in on the prospects of a potential record crop this year on top of a very large outlook for the South American harvest. The potential for New Crop Corn in the mid $5.00/bu range (as indicated by CME futures) and significantly lower beef production, has feeders expressing some long-term optimism. This optimism is reflective in the Feeder Cattle markets across the nation.

Heavier feeders, weighing over 600 lbs, have seen a reduction in demand and price. On the other hand, light weight calves have advance with good demand and intentions to grass these cattle with the hopes of cheaper corn around harvest.

Locally, a few attractive sets of 300-500 lb calves traded up to 176.00/cwt at Vintage Livestock Auction in Paradise, PA. Similar weight calves advanced over 200.00/cwt in Virginia. Auctions at lower latitudes of the southern Midwest, with earlier spring green-ups, witness 300-400 lbs calves trading well over 220.00/cwt.

All cattle markets are priced per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1250-1650 lbs 126.50-132.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1375-1595 lbs 122.00-128.00; SELECT 2-3: 117.00-125.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1425-1715 lbs 107.00-110.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1505-1650 lbs 103.00-108.50; SELECT 2-3: 1400-1600 lbs 100.00-105.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1350-1450 lbs 124.00-124.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1115-1455 lbs 119.00-123.50; SELECT 2-3: 1100-1350 lbs 115.00-118.50.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 76.00-80.00, High dress 81.00-84.50, Low dress 72.00-76.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 74.00-80.00, High dress 81.00-84.00, Low dress 69.00-74.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 73.00-79.50, High dress 80.00-82.50, Low dress 68.00-73.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 71.00-76.00, High dress 76.00-81.00, Low dress 63.00-70.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 905-1850 lbs 92.00-98.00, high dress 105.00-106.00, low dress 82.00-89.00.

CALF SUMMARY: This week in Lancaster County, Holstein Bull calves continued their rally trading 10.00-20.00 higher with very good demand from both veal producers as well as dairy beef producers. Heifers traded mostly 10.00 higher with moderate demand. The Composite Veal Carcass Values for the Northeast United States was quoted from 325.00-364.00/cwt this Thursday, with a weighted average value of 334.12/cwt (Hide-Off). All prices per cwt.

MONDAY: HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 85-135 lbs 150.00-167.00; #2: 80-135 lbs 125.00-145.00; #3: 80-115 lbs 100.00-120.00; UTILITY: 80-105 lbs 60.00-90.00, 55-65 lbs 35.00-50.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 90-110 lbs 95.00-120.00; #2: 65-95 lbs 60.00-95.00; UTILITY/NON-TUBING: 60-70 lbs 45.00-52.00.

TUESDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 123 lbs 130.00, 95-112 lbs 151.00-159.00, 90 lbs 145.00; #2: 84-113 lbs 137.00-157.00; #3: 108 lbs 120.00, 84-95 lbs 139.00-141.00, 73 lbs 45.00; UTILITY: 82-105 lbs 30.00-40.00, 63-71 lbs 17.00-25.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 93-111 lbs 112.00-120.00, 84 lbs 80.00; #2: 93 lbs 105.00, 75-84 lbs 40.00-70.00; UTILITY/NON-TUBING: 93 lbs 47.00, 71 lbs 30.00.

THURSDAY: GRADED BULL CALVES: #1: 120-128 lbs 139.00, 86-118 lbs 142.00-151.00; #2: 112-128 lbs 138.00-141.00, 80-110 lbs 142.00-149.00; #3: 100-130 lbs 125.00-127.00, 80-98 lbs 135.00-147.00, 72-78 lbs 60.00; UTILITY: 90-110 lbs 60.00-67.00, 60-78 lbs 30.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: 85-10 lbs 115.00-130.00; #2: 65-100 lbs 70.00-110.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 65-85 lbs 40.00-50.00, 50-70 lbs 20.00-30.00.

Source: USDA Dept of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Vintage Special Feeder Cattle Sale
Paradise, Pa.
Feb. 8, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 226; Last Sale: 392.

Friday`s special offered a very light run of feeder cattle. Buyer turnout was lighter than normal due to severe weather moving through the trade area. Trade was still active. Market trends were firm with a higher undertone noted for the light run. Demand was good overall. All prices per cwt.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 171.00-173.00, 400-500 lbs 150.00-176.00, 500-600 lbs 149.00-168.00, 600-700 lbs 140.00-154.00, 700-800 lbs 126.00-138.00, 800-900 lbs 133.00-133.00, 1000 lbs 120.00 Individual; MED/LGE 2: 400-500 lbs 137.00-150.00, 600-700 lbs 125.00-133.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEINS: LGE 3: 200-350 lbs 102.00-117.00, 500-600 lbs 99.00-105.00, 800-1150 lbs 94.00-98.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 117.00-135.00 Fancy 174.00, 400-500 lbs 137.00-143.00, 500-600 lbs 122.00-127.00, 600-700 lbs 127.00-129.00, 700-800 lbs 112.00-126.00, 800-900 lbs 97.00-102.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 400-500 lbs 153.00-174.00, 600-700 lbs 117.00-137.00, 700-800 lbs 128.00-132.00.

Source: USDA Dept of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-354-2391. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTICE: Next feeder cattle sale March 8 at 6.

Vintage Sales Stables Monday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 192; Last week 254. CALVES: 114; Last week 117.

When compared to last Monday`s sale, slaughter steers sold 1.00-2.00 lower with light demand. Cows traded 1.00-2.00 higher with good demand. Cattle supply consisted of 90 steers, 14 heifers, 71 cows, 4 bull, and 13 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1250-1650 lbs 126.50-130.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1375-1595 lbs 122.00-126.00, YG 4-5 117.00-120.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: few 1425-1715 lbs 107.00-109.00; CHOICE 2-3: few 1505-1590 lbs 103.00-106.75.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: CHOICE 2-3: 1115-1455 lbs 119.00-123.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 75.50-79.00, Low dress 69.00-72.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 73.50-77.50, High dress 79.50-81.50, Low dress 65.00-69.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 72.00-76.00, Low dress 65.00-71.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1-2: 1325-1645 lbs 89.50-95.50.

CALVES: Compared to last week’s sale, bull calves sold 10.00-20.00 higher with very good demand. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULLS CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 135.00-147.00; #2: 80-125 lbs 110.00-125.00; #3: 80-125 lbs 80.00-100.00; UTILITY: 70-110 lbs 40.00-60.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350.

NOTICE: Next feeder cattle sale March 8.

New Holland Monday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 629; Last week 710; Last year 599. CALVES: 371; Last week 428; Last year 394.

When compared to last week’s sale, slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00-2.00 lower. Demand remained good despite a lower trade. Bulls traded steady with good demand. Cattle supply included 86 slaughter steers, 86 heifers, 318 cows, 104 bulls, and 35 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 77.00-80.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 74.00-78.50, Low dress 70.50-73.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 73.00-77.50, Low dress 69.00-72.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 71.00-75.50, High dress 75.50-78.50, Low dress 65.00-70.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 905-1800 lbs 92.00-98.00, high dress 105.00-106.00, low dress 82.00-89.00.

CALVES: Compared to last week, bull calves sold 10.00-15.00 higher with very good demand. Heifers sold steady with light demand. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 85-135 lbs 150.00-167.00; #2: 80-135 lbs 125.00-145.00; #3: 80-115 lbs 100.00-120.00; UTILITY: 80-105 lbs 60.00-90.00, 55-65 lbs 35.00-50.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 90-110 lbs 95.00-120.00; #2: 65-95 lbs 60.00-95.00; UTILITY/NON-TUBING: 60-70 lbs 45.00-52.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Vintage Sales Stables Tuesday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Feb. 12, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 457; Last week 457; Last year 464. CALVES: 667; Last week 610; Last year 633.

Compared to last week: No slaughter steers offered. Slaughter Holsteins not enough for a market test. Demand moderate. Slaughter cows traded steady to 1.00 higher compared to last week on good demand. Slaughter cattle supplies consisted of 39 steers and heifers, 408 cows, 6 bulls, and 4 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEINS: CHOICE 2-3: 1500-1650 lbs 107.00-109.75; SELECT 2-3: 1425-1700 lbs 100.50-105.50.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 76.00-78.50, High dress 81.00-84.50, Low dress 72.00-75.50; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 76.00-79.50, High dress 82.00-83.50, Low dress 69.00-75.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 76.00-79.50, High dress 80.00-82.50, Low dress 68.00-75.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 71.00-76.00, High dress 78.50-81.00, Low dress 63.00-70.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1850-2265 lbs avg dress 86.50-88.50, 1350-2025 lbs high dressing 92.00-95.50.

CALVES: Compared to last Tuesday’s sale, Holstein Bull calves sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher on good demand. Heifers sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher on moderate demand. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 531 head for Tuesday’s sale. All calves are sold by the cwt.

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 123 lbs 130.00, 95-112 lbs 151.00-159.00, 90 lbs 145.00; #2: 84-113 lbs 137.00-157.00; #3: 108 lbs 120.00, 84-95 lbs 139.00-141.00, 73 lbs 45.00; UTILITY: 82-105 lbs 30.00-40.00, 63-71 lbs 17.00-25.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 93-111 lbs 112.00-120.00, 84 lbs 80.00; #2: 93 lbs 105.00, 75-84 lbs 40.00-70.00; UTILITY/NON-TUBING: 93 lbs 47.00, 71 lbs 30.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTE: Next Feeder Sale March 8.

New Holland Weekly Dairy Sale
New Holland, Pa
Feb. 13, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 602; Last Sale: 206; Last Year: 307.

Compared to last week, dairy cows sold 100.00-200.00 higher with good demand. Bred heifers sold 200.00-300.00 higher with good demand. Total of 373 heifers offered for the special heifer sale. Wednesday’s supply included 161 fresh milking cows, 36 short-bred cows, 9 springing cows, 70 short-bred heifers, 243 springing heifers, 56 open heifers, and 20 bulls. One hundred percent of reported supply Holsteins unless otherwise noted. All sales sold on a per head basis.

FRESH COWS: Supreme: 1800.00-2050.00; Approved: 1500.00-1750.00; Medium: 1200.00-1450.00; Common: 1000.00-1175.00.

CULL COWS: 450.00-1100.00.

SPRINGING COWS: (7-9 months bred) Supreme: 1325.00-1400.00; Approved: 1200.00-1325.00; Medium: 1050.00-1100.00.

BRED COWS: (4-6 months bred) Approved: 1275.00-1300.00; Medium: 1025.00-1075.00; Common: 850.00-900.00.

SHORT BRED COWS: (1-3 months) Supreme: 1500.00-1550.00; Approved: 1350.00-1450.00; Medium: 1000.00-1175.00; Common: 900.00-975.00.

SHORT BRED HEIFERS: (1-3 months): Approved: 1000.00-1125.00; Medium: 850.00-900.00; Common: 725.00-825.00.

BRED HEIFERS: (4-6 months): Supreme: 1375.00-1425.00; Approved: 1150.00-1325.00; Medium: 975.00-1100.00; Common: 725.00-900.00.

SPRINGING HEIFERS (7-9 months): Supreme: 1475.00-1675.00; Approved: 1300.00-1450.00; Medium: 1050.00-1275.00; Common: 800.00-1025.00.

OPEN HEIFERS: 300-600 LBS: Medium: 425.00-450.00; Common: 350.00-375.00, Jersey 300.00-375.00. 600-900 LBS: Approved: 900.00-925.00; Medium: 825.00-885.00; Common: 600.00-750.00, Jersey 485.00-550.00. 900-1200 LBS: Approved: 900.00-925.00; Medium: 825.00-885.00; Common: 600.00-750.00.

BULLS: 300-600 lbs 425.00-475.00, 600-900 lbs 675.00-925.00, 900-1200 lbs 975.00-1125.00, 1200-1500 lbs 1175.00-1400.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Thursday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 14, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 948; Last week 898; Last year 1062. CALVES: 540; Last week 624; Last year 634.

When compared to last Thursday`s sale, slaughter steers sold mostly 1.00-2.00 lower. Demand was good. Slaughter Holsteins 1.00-2.00 lower compared to a very light test last week. Demand was moderate. Slaughter heifers 1.00-2.00 lower compared to a very light test last week. Slaughter cows mostly steady. Demand was good. Cattle supplies included 229 slaughter steers; 115 heifers; 484 cows; 29 bulls; and 11 feeder cattle. All prices per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1250-1650 lbs 130.00-134.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1270-1600 lbs 125.50-129.75; SELECT 1-3: 1250-1650 lbs 117.00-125.25.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1500-1650 lbs 109.00-110.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1550-1650 lbs 106.00-108.50; SELECT 1-3: 1400-1600 lbs 100.00-105.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/.PRIME 3-4: 1350-1450 lbs 124.00-124.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1300-1400 lbs 119.00-123.50; SELECT 1-3: 1100-1350 lbs 115.00-118.50.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 77.00-80.00, High dress 81.00-82.50, Low dress 73.00-76.50; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 76.00-80.00, High dress 81.00-84.00, Low dress 72.00-75.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 76.00-79.50, High dress 80.00-82.00, Low dress 70.00-75.50; LEAN: 88-90% lean, Avg dress 71.00-75.50, High dress 76.00-79.00, Low dress 64.00-70.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1250-1850 lbs avg dress 92.00-95.00, 1180 lbs high dress 106.00, 1530 lbs low dress 86.50.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: Graded bull calves sold mostly firm compared to last week on good demand. Heifers sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher on good demand compared to last week. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 362 head for this Thursday’s graded sale. One hundred percent supply Holstein calves unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

GRADED BULL CALVES: #1: 120-128 lbs 139.00, 86-118 lbs 142.00-151.00; #2: 112-128 lbs 138.00-141.00, 80-110 lbs 142.00-149.00; #3: 100-130 lbs 125.00-127.00, 80-98 lbs 135.00-147.00, 72-78 lbs 60.00; UTILITY: 90-110 lbs 60.00-67.00, 60-78 lbs 30.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: 85-10 lbs 115.00-130.00; #2: 65-100 lbs 70.00-110.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 65-85 lbs 40.00-50.00, 50-70 lbs 20.00-30.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Hog Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 785; Last Week: 1068; Year Ago: 912.

When compared to last week`s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 2.00-3.00 lower with moderate demand. Sows traded mostly steady with moderate demand. All prices per cwt.

BARROWS/GILTS: 49-54% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 66.00-68.00, 300-400 lbs 68.50-71.00; 45-49% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 62.00-65.00, 300-400 lbs 65.00-67.00.

SOWS: US 1-3: 300-500 lbs 42.00-45.00, 500-700 lbs 48.00-50.00.

BOARS: 300-700 lbs 15.00-17.00.

Source: USDA Agricultural Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Weekly Horse Sale
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Report Supplied by Auction

163 total head. Overall market steady. Prices per head.

Work: 300.00-900.00.

Driving: 250.00-500.00.

Riding: 350.00-475.00.

Better Riding: 400.00-1200.00.

Registered Riding: 500.00-1500.00.

Ponies: 25.00-175.00.

Large Ponies: 25.00-475.00.

New Holland Sheep & Goat Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2013
Reports Supplied by USDA

SHEEP/LAMB RECEIPTS: 2045; Last Monday: 1650; Year Ago: 1365.

GOAT RECEIPTS: 1465; Last Monday: 710; Year Ago: 1269.

SHEEP/LAMBS: When compared to last week, slaughter lambs sold mostly steady to 10.00 lower on moderate demand. Slaughter ewes traded mostly steady on good demand. Slaughter supply consisted of 82 percent lambs, 14 percent slaughter ewes, and 4 percent miscellaneous stock. All sheep and lambs are destined for non-traditional markets. All sheep and lambs are sold by the hundred weight,on actual weights. Non-Traditional Markets:

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED/SHORN: CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 50-80 lbs 160.00-184.00, 50-80 lbs hair sheep 172.00-208.00, 80-100 lbs 170.00-182.00, hair sheep 156.00-185.00; CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 50-60 lbs 217.00-262.00, 60-80 lbs 196.00-217.00; GOOD/CHOICE 1-3: 60-80 lbs 148.00-162.00, hair sheep 144.00-172.00, 80-90 lbs hair sheep 140.00-156.00, 90-110 lbs 122.00- 146.00, 90-120 lbs hair sheep 120.00-144.00, 110-150 lbs 110.00-142.00; UTILITY/GOOD 1-2: 90-100 lbs 110.00-116.00, 120-140 lbs 106.00-112.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: Medium Flesh 90-110 lbs 70.00-74.00, 130- 160 lbs 70.00-94.00, 200-250 lbs 60.00-82.00; UTILITY 1-2: Thin Flesh 110-160 lbs 46.00-64.00, 160-190 lbs 50.00-53.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS: 140-160 lbs 66.00-90.00, 160-170 lbs hair sheep 52.00-64.00, 205-250 lbs 34.00-62.00.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kid goats sold mostly 10.00-20.00 lower compared to a very light test last week. Nanny goats sold 20.00-30.00 lower compared to a very light test. Slaughter billies sold 30.00-40.00 lower. Demand was moderate for all classes. Slaughter supply consisted of 47 percent Slaughter Kids, 30 percent Slaughter Nannies, and 23 percent bucks/billies and wethers. All Goats are sold by the head on estimated weights.

SLAUGHTER KIDS: SEL 1: 40-45 lbs 106.00-127.00, 50-55 lbs 132.00-144.00, 60-90 lbs 140.00-160.00, 90-110 lbs 148.00-177.00; SEL 2: 40-60 lbs 82.00-100.00, 60-80 lbs 110.00-138.00, 80-110 lbs 120.00-145.00; SEL 3: 40-60 lbs 50.00-80.00, 60-80 lbs 102.00-108.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES: SEL 1: 110-125 lbs 124.00-154.00, 130-150 lbs 140.00-158.00; SEL 2: 100-125 lbs 90.00-120.00, 130-145 lbs 114.00-140.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES: SEL 1: 120-140 lbs 140.00-170.00, 150-190 lbs 170.00-262.00; SEL 2: 110-145 lbs 124.00-140.00, 150-170 lbs 148.00-168.00.

SLAUGHTER WETHERS: SEL 1: 80-110 lbs 155.00-190.00, 110-125 lbs 156.00-178.00, 125-150 lbs 165.00-190.00, 150-180 lbs 257.00- 272.00.

Source: USDA Dept. of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

VA Graded Feeder Cattle Summary
Richmond, Va.
Feb. 7, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Virginia Feeder Cattle Summary Sales at Blackstone, Front Royal, Lynchburg, Radiant and Springlake. State Graded Weighted Average for Jan 31-Feb 06, 2013.

Feeder Cattle: 2195 (Steers 737; Heifers 956; Bulls 502).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 13 head, 300-400 lbs 196.00-203.00; 93 head, 400-500 lbs 157.50-190.00; 133 head, 500-600 lbs 133.00-170.50; 81 head, 600-700 lbs 138.00-150.00; 102 head, 700-800 lbs 131.00-146.00; 18 head, 800-900 lbs 114.00-133.00; 14 head, 900-1000 lbs 115.00-134.50. MED/LGE 2: 10 head, 300-400 lbs 190.00-202.75; 53 head, 400-500 lbs 169.00-185.00; 66 head, 500-600 lbs 144.00-167.50; 49 head, 600-700 lbs 132.00-151.00; 15 head, 700-800 lbs 124.00-131.00. MED/LGE 3 : 4 head, 300-400 lbs 174.00-185.00; 13 head, 400-500 lbs 155.00-175.50; 17 head, 500-600 lbs 137.50-148.00; 9 head, 600-700 lbs 130.00-133.50.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 10 head, 300-400 lbs 187.00-201.00; 82 head, 400-500 lbs 120.00-186.50; 72 head, 500-600 lbs 137.00-156.50; 37 head, 600-700 lbs 117.00-139.50; 5 head, 700-800 lbs 117.00-119.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 12 head, 500-600 lbs 140.25. MED/LGE 2: 16 head, 300-400 lbs 175.00-209.00; 133 head, 400-500 lbs 131.00-196.25; 45 head, 500-600 lbs 116.00-165.00; 20 head, 600-700 lbs 115.00-136.50; 5 head, 700-800 lbs 118.00. MED/LGE 3: 7 head, 400-500 lbs 139.00-159.00; 9 head, 500-600 lbs 88.00-142.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 15 head, 300-400 lbs 150.00-166.00; 95 head, 400-500 lbs 130.00-156.00; 146 head, 500-600 lbs 130.00-149.00; 66 head, 600-700 lbs 127.50-143.00; 29 head, 700-800 lbs 118.00-130.00. MED/LGE 2: 50 head, 300-400 lbs 142.00-166.00; 143 head, 400-500 lbs 133.00-158.50; 117 head, 500-600 lbs 105.00-144.50; 56 head, 600-700 lbs 121.00-135.50; 17 head, 700-800 lbs 96.00-125.25. MED/LGE 3: 26 head, 300-400 lbs 125.00-158.00; 48 head, 400-500 lbs 120.00-148.50; 47 head, 500-600 lbs 121.00-134.75; 11 head, 600-700 lbs 112.00-129.75.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

Lynchburg, VA Graded Feeder Cattle
Richmond, Va.
Feb. 11, 2013
Report Supplied By USDA

All prices per cwt.
Feeder Cattle: 1107 (Steers 297; Heifers 484; Bulls 326).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 26 head, 400-500 lbs 178.50-184.75; 39 head, 500-600 lbs 154.00-160.25; 28 head, 600-700 lbs 139.00-142.00; 19 head, 700-800 lbs 133.00. MED/LGE 2: 6 head, 300-400 lbs 195.00; 41 head, 400-500 lbs 178.50-180.75; 37 head, 500-600 lbs 149.00-161.75; 25 head, 600-700 lbs 133.50-143.00; 11 head, 700-800 lbs 127.00-130.00. MED/LGE 3: 14 head, 400-500 lbs 160.00-169.00; 17 head, 500-600 lbs 145.50-150.50; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 136.25.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 11 head, 300-400 lbs 162.00-167.00; 38 head, 400-500 lbs 135.00-145.50; 44 head, 500-600 lbs 133.00-134.50; 26 head, 600-700 lbs 125.00. MED/LGE 2: 31 head, 300-400 lbs 164.00; 76 head, 400-500 lbs 138.00-148.75; 64 head, 500-600 lbs 134.25-134.50; 27 head, 600-700 lbs 125.00-125.25; 10 head, 700-800 lbs 122.75. MED/LGE 3: 26 head, 300-400 lbs 153.00-158.50; 40 head, 400-500 lbs 147.00-149.25; 31 head, 500-600 lbs 131.50-132.75; 4 head, 600-700 lbs 123.00-126.00; 5 head, 700-800 lbs 122.50.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 7 head, 300-400 lbs 197.50; 68 head, 400-500 lbs 161.50-181.00; 38 head, 500-600 lbs 138.00-150.75; 6 head, 600-700 lbs 136.50. MED/LGE 2: 14 head, 300-400 lbs 194.00-199.00; 101 head, 400-500 lbs 164.00-186.00; 27 head, 500-600 lbs 144.50-154.00; 10 head, 600-700 lbs 137.50.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

Radiant, VA Graded Feeder Cattle
Richmond, Va.
Feb. 13, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

All prices per cwt.
Receipts: 1032 (Steers 505; Heifers 465; Bulls 62).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 13 head, 400-500 lbs 187.00-190.00; 42 head, 500-600 lbs 120.00-165.00; 68 head, 600-700 lbs 118.00-145.00; 65 head, 700-800 lbs 127.00-135.00; 92 head, 800-900 lbs 96.00-128.00; 9 head, 900-1000 lbs 91.00-114.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 46 head, 600-700 lbs 129.00-147.00; 12 head, 800-900 lbs 124.00. MED/LGE 2: 8 head, 400-500 lbs 186.50; 27 head, 500-600 lbs 128.00-159.00; 21 head, 600-700 lbs 81.00-135.00; 41 head, 700-800 lbs 124.00-138.00; 12 head, 800-900 lbs 118.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 13 head, 400-500 lbs 155.50-161.50; 60 head, 500-600 lbs 129.50-142.50; 64 head, 600-700 lbs 125.00-131.50; 58 head, 700-800 lbs 111.00-130.50; 54 head, 800-900 lbs 113.00-126.50; 9 head, 900-1000 lbs 85.00-119.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 11 head, 700-800 lbs 114.50. MED/LGE 2: 4 head, 300-400 lbs 161.50; 11 head, 400-500 lbs 150.50-159.50; 19 head, 500-600 lbs 119.00-131.25; 13 head, 600-700 lbs 119.00-119.50; 53 head, 700-800 lbs 100.00-117.00. MED/LGE 3: 5 head, 300-400 lbs 133.00; 17 head, 400-500 lbs 139.50-143.00; 18 head, 500-600 lbs 110.00-128.50; 6 head, 600-700 lbs 118.00-120.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 9 head, 400-500 lbs 175.00-184.50; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 130.00. MED/LGE 2: 5 head, 400-500 lbs 131.00-181.00; 8 head, 500-600 lbs 110.00-156.00.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804-786-3947.

Paris, KY Feeder Cattle
Frankfort, Ky.
Feb. 7, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Cattle Receipts: 1169; Last Week: 791.

Compared to last week, Steers were 4.00 to 5.00 higher and Heifers steady to firm.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1-2: 300-400 lbs 180.00-182.00 few 194.00-205.00, 400-500 lbs 160.00-177.00, 500-600 lbs 153.00-165.50, 600-700 lbs 145.00-160.00, 700-800 lbs 135.50-142.00, 800-900 lbs 129.50-132.25, 900-1000 lbs 122.50-128.00; MED/LGE 2-3: 400-500 lbs 145.00-157.00, 500-600 lbs 141.00-150.00, 600-700 lbs 126.00-138.50, 700-800 lbs 123.00-133.00, 800-900 lbs 118.00-126.00, 900-1000 lbs 120.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1-2: 300-400 lbs 172.50, 400-500 lbs 160.00-172.00, 500-600 lbs 143.00-152.00, 600-700 lbs 133.00-137.00, 700-800 lbs 124.00-128.25; MED/LGE 2-3: 500-600 lbs 125.00-140.00, 600-700 lbs 123.00-124.00, 800-900 lbs 103.00-108.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1-2: 300-400 lbs 153.00-160.00, 400-500 lbs 139.00-153.00, 500-600 lbs 136.00-141.00, 600-700 lbs 127.00-137.00, 700-800 lbs 127.50-130.90, 800-900 lbs 125.00-126.00; MED/LGE 2-3: 400-500 lbs 132.50-138.00, 500-600 lbs 118.00-134.00, 600-700 lbs 117.00-125.00, 700-800 lbs 113.00-122.00, 800-900 lbs 111.00-115.00.

This report reflects prices of the majority of cattle with a USDA grade, weight, and sex on this sale date. This report does not represent all animals at the sale on that date.

Source: USDA-KY Dept of Ag Market News Service, Frankfort, KY. Mark Rouse, Alex Tolbert, 502-564-0290x238.

Somerset, KY Feeder Cattle
Frankfort, Ky.
Feb. 9, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Lake Cumberland Livestock Market, Somerset Kentucky. Cattle weighed at time of sale.

Receipts: 1356; Last Week: 893; Last Year: 1324.

Compared to last week: Steers below 600 lbs were 3.00 to 5.00 higher, above 600 lbs steady. Heifers below 600 lbs were 3.00 to 5.00 higher, above 600 lbs 2.00 to 3.00 lower. Demand was very good below 600 lbs and good above 600 lbs for all classes.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1-2: 200-300 lbs 162.50-182.50, 300-400 lbs 165.00-172.50 fancy 200.00-220.00, 400-500 lbs 172.00-188.00 fancy 200.00-211.00, 500-600 lbs 156.00-173.00, 600-700 lbs 140.00-155.00, 700-800 lbs 129.00-140.00, 800-900 lbs 124.50-130.00; MED/LGE 2-3: 300-400 lbs 140.00-159.00, 400-500 lbs 154.00-171.00, 500-600 lbs 133.00-152.00, 600-700 lbs 130.00-139.00, 700-800 lbs 115.00-127.00, 800-900 lbs 110.00-120.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 3: 300-400 lbs 110.00-123.00, 400-500 lbs 94.00-103.00, 600-700 lbs 98.00-100.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1-2: 300-400 lbs 175.00-190.00 fancy 200.00-220.00, 400-500 lbs 166.00-185.00 fancy 193.00-201.00, 500-600 lbs 142.00-155.00 fancy 157.00-164.00, 600-700 lbs 133.50-144.00, 700-800 lbs 118.00-128.00, 800-900 lbs 104.00-110.00; MED/LGE 2-3: 300-400 lbs 150.00-165.00, 400-500 lbs 142.00-164.00, 500-600 lbs 125.00-140.00, 600-700 lbs 119.00-130.00, 700-800 lbs 100.00-110.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1-2: 200-300 lbs 160.00-172.50, 300-400 lbs 158.00-167.50 fancy 171.00-175.00, 400-500 lbs 139.00-150.00 fancy 152.00-157.50, 500-600 lbs 130.00-146.00, 600-700 lbs 121.00-134.50, 700-800 lbs 114.00-128.00; MED/LGE 2-3: 200-300 lbs 140.00-150.00, 300-400 lbs 129.00-149.00, 400-500 lbs 120.00-133.00, 500-600 lbs 114.00-129.00, 600-700 lbs 110.00-120.00, 700-800 lbs 105.00-113.00, 800-900 lbs 96.00-112.00.

This report reflects prices of the majority of cattle with a USDA grade, weight and sex on this sale date. This report does not represent all animals at the sale on that date.

Source: USDA-KY Dept of Ag Market News Service, Frankfort, KY. Jeff Harrod, Alex Tolbert, 502-564-0290x238.

East Fluid Milk & Cream Review
Madison, Wis.
Feb. 13, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Fluid cream and condensed skim prices in tanklot quantities: spot prices of class II cream, dollars per lb. Butterfat: F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast — 1.6950-1.8038.

Prices of condensed skim, dollars per lb. solids, F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast - Class II - includes monthly formula prices — 1.56-1.61. Northeast - Class III - spot prices — 1.54-1.59.

Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of FLORIDA: THIS WK: In 0, Out 41; LAST WK: In 0, Out 20; LAST YR: In 0, Out 133. Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of other SOUTHEASTERN STATES: 0.

A major winter storm hit the Northeast region, dumping more than 30 inches of snow on over 40 cities and towns in New England. Connecticut, Massachusetts and the coastal regions of Maine were hardest hit. Many trucks were unable to make it to farms, which caused some milk to be dumped. Power outages were also a problem with some areas not returning to the power grid until late Monday.

Class I demand is strong as many dairy shelves were depleted prior to the storm. Some delays in dairy product delivery have been experienced as numerous roads remain congested with snow removal efforts. New York and Pennsylvania did not get the brunt of the storm and dairy operations were only marginally affected. Manufacturing milk supplies marginally increased in the Mid-Atlantic region as milk was diverted from New England and the Northeast. Dairy plant operations quickly returned to normal following the weekend.

Milk production in Florida continues to increase, but remains below year ago levels. Some producers are indicating they are not inclined to change feed ratios to optimize the flush, due to feed supply constraints. Hay has increased in price and rainfall totals are insufficient to prompt a steady regrowth of hay. Export spot loads moving out of state this week totaled 41. Milk supplies are nearly in balance with demand in the Southeast region with only a few loads being shipped to auxiliary manufacturing facilities. Milk production continues to show marginal increases on a week to week basis. Class I demand in the region is steady.

Cream supplies remain heavy in the East, due to volumes from Class I plants and yogurt manufacturers. The combination of the two cream streams quickly surpasses demand, necessitating loads be moved out of region in order to find a home. Demand for cream has improved somewhat, but not enough to dent the oversupply situation. Some increased cream demand was noted from cream cheese, ice cream and bottled cream manufacturers. Significant volumes of cream continue to flow to churns.

Multiples moderated this week in a range of 1.00-1.16, with the lower end of the range reflective of those loads shipped out of region. Demand for condensed skim remains flat with only some slight increases coming from Class II production. A majority of condensed skim volumes continue to flow to dryers. Spot load sales activity remains light.

rick.whipp@ams.usda.gov

Dairy Product Price Highlights
Washington, D. C.
Feb. 13, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

BUTTER prices received for 25 kilogram and 68 pound boxes meeting United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Grade AA standards averaged $1.52 per pound for the week ending February 9, 2013. The United States (US) price per pound increased 0.7 cents from the previous week.

CHEDDAR CHEESE prices received for US 40 pound blocks averaged $1.68 per pound for the week ending February 9, 2013. The price per pound decreased 2.2 cents from the previous week. The price for US 500 pound barrels adjusted to 38 percent moisture averaged $1.61 per pound, down 5.0 cents from the previous week.

DRY WHEY prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade standards averaged 64.7 cents per pound for the week ending February 9, 2013. The US price per pound decreased 0.1 cents from the previous week.

NONFAT DRY MILK prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade or United States Public Health Service (USPHS) Grade A standards averaged $1.57 per pound for the week ending February 9, 2013. The US price per pound increased 3.5 cents from the previous week.

Apple Processing Report
Fresno, Calif.
Feb. 7, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Utilized for Processing in 1 ton Units in Appalachian District

JUICE APPLES: Week ending 1/12: 912; Week ending 1/19: 559; Week ending 1/26: 645; Week ending 2/2: 594; 2012 to date: 39,964; 2011 to date: 46,040; Final 2011: 62,576.

CANNER APPLES: Week ending 1/12: 6,505; Week ending 1/19: 5,720; Week ending 1/26: 3,970; Week ending 2/2: 6,166; 2012 to date: 112,153; 2011 to date: 128,762; Final 2011: 209,853.

TOTAL APPLES: Week ending 1/12: 7,417; Week ending 1/19: 6,279; Week ending 1/26: 4,615; Week ending 2/2: 6,760; 2012 to date: 152,117; 2011 to date: 174,802; Final 2011: 272,429.

Trading

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT(VA, WV, MD, PA): Trading is fairly slow for moderate supplies as growers offer more fruit to processors. There is a wide range in pressure on some of these offerings. Processors continue to pull pre- contracted fruit from storages. Canners U.S. One F.O.B. packing house or receiving station per cwt 2 1/2 inch minimum and up various varieties mostly Golden Delicious, Rome, Fuji, Stayman, Empire, and Yorks contract sales $21.00-26.00, Straight loads of juice stock per hundredweight (cwt) U.S. Cider grade all varieties includes contract commitments 16.00-21.00 occas higher.

NEW YORK: Trading is fairly slow for Juice Stock and Canners/Peelers. Prices for Canners/Peelers and Juice Stock about steady. Supplies are moderate. Purchase prices are variety, size and quality dependent. Prices for processing apples on Wednesday, February 06, 2013 F.O.B. packing house or receiving station per cwt. 2012 crop: Canners/Peelers - (Utilizing All Available Varieties): $17.00-20.00, mostly $20.00. Includes previous commitments at higher prices. Juice Stock - (Utilizing All Available Varieties): $16.00-20.00, mostly $18.00-20.00 occasional higher. Includes previous commitments.

Shipping Point Trends

NEW YORK: Shipments 57-61-52 — Movement expected to remain about the same. Trading moderate. Prices Empire cartons tray pack 100s and Empire cartons cell pack 100s slightly lower, other generally unchanged. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-pound film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum McIntosh mostly 27.00-29.00, Gala mostly 31.00, Red Delicious mostly 24.00-24.50, Empire mostly 25.00-28.00, Rome mostly 22.00-23.00, Golden Delicious mostly 28.00. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy tray pack Red Delicious 80s-88s mostly 28.00, 100s mostly 26.00; Gala 80s-100s 35.00-38.00; McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 36.00, 100s 35.00-36.00; Empire 80s-88s mostly 34.00-35.00, 100s mostly 32.00; Rome 80s- 100s mostly 24.00-25.00. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy cell pack McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 36.00, 100s 35.00-36.00; Empire 80s-88s mostly 34.00-35.00, 100s mostly 32.00.

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD-PA-VA-WV): Shipments 30-21-23 Export 0-0-0 — Movement expected to decrease slightly. Trading fairly slow. Prices unchanged. Cartons traypack U.S. Extra Fancy Red Delicious 72s-100s mostly 26.00; Golden Delicious 72s-88s mostly 26.00-28.00; Fuji 72s-88s 34.00-35.00; Pink Lady 72s-88s 43.00-44.00; Cartons 12 3-lb film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum U.S. Extra Fancy Red Delicious mostly 24.00-25.00, Golden Delicious mostly 25.00, Fuji 28.00-29.00, Red Rome mostly 23.00, and Empire 29.00.

NEW ENGLAND: Shipments 6-7-5 — Movement expected to remain about the same. Unofficial prices for Monday, February 4, 2013 Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-pound film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum McIntosh mostly 28.00-32.00. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy tray pack McIntosh and 35.00-42.00.

NOTE: For a complete national report, visit marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv, or call 559-487-5178.

Monthly Bison Carcass Report
Des Moines, Iowa
Feb. 12, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

ACTUAL SLAUGHTER NUMBERS IN FEDERALLY INSPECTED PLANTS (not necessarily inspected) BISON: Week Ending 1/05/13 610; Week Ending 1/12/13 848; Week Ending 1/19/13 820; Week Ending 1/26/13 782; Total 3,060.

CANADIAN LIVE BISON IMPORTS INTO U.S. FOR JANUARY: Slaughter Male: 771; Slaughter Female: 484; Feeder Male: 121; Feeder Female: 100; Total: 1470.

BISON CARCASSES: Compared to December’s report: Prices for bison carcasses were similar to December prices for all gender and ages of bison. While both the top and bottom side prices were slightly lower in January, the overall weighted average was stable.

BISON MEAT: Compared to December’s report: Prices inched higher for fresh wholesale grain-fed bison meats, especially end meat, while prices were slightly lower for frozen bison meats. A price floor appeared to be set for case ready ground bison as demand continued.

Source: USDA Market News Service, Des Moines, IA. Nina Biensen, 515-284-4460.

U.S. Crop Production
Washington, D.C.
Feb. 8, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Orange Production Down Less Than 1%

The United States all orange forecast for the 2012-2013 season is 8.79 million tons, down less than 1 percent from the previous forecast and down 3 percent from the 2011-2012 final utilization. The Florida all orange forecast, at 141 million boxes (6.35 million tons), is down 1 percent from the January forecast and down 4 percent from last season’s final utilization. Early, midseason, and Navel varieties in Florida are forecast at 66.0 million boxes (2.97 million tons), unchanged from the January forecast but down 11 percent from last season. Droppage is the highest since the 1969-1970 season while size is below average. The Florida Valencia orange forecast, at 75.0 million boxes (3.38 million tons), is down 1 percent from the January forecast but up 4 percent from the 2011-2012 crop. California and Texas forecasts are carried forward from January.

Florida frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) yield forecast for the 2012-2013 season is 1.62 gallons per box at 42.0 degrees Brix, up 1 percent from the January forecast but down 1 percent from last season’s final yield of 1.63 gallons per box. The early-midseason portion is projected at 1.49 gallons per box, down 3 percent from last season’s yield of 1.53 gallons per box. The Valencia portion is projected at 1.73 gallons per box, 1 percent lower than last year’s final yield of 1.75 gallons per box. All projections of yield assume the processing relationships this season will be similar to those of the past several seasons.

Released February 8, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

U.S. Feed Outlook
Washington, D. C.
Feb. 12, 2013
Reports supplied by USDA/ERS

Brazil Projected To Be World’s Largest Corn Exporter

In trade year 2012/13 (October 2012 through September 2013) Brazil is projected to export more corn (24.5 million tons) than the United States (24.0 million). This is a dramatic change from the historical norm for the last century, when the U.S. share of world corn trade reached over 80 percent in 1979/80 and often exceeded two-thirds. In 2012/13, the U.S. share is forecast to fall to 24.6 percent while Brazil is forecast to increase to 25.1 percent.

In the first four months of the trade year (October-January), Brazil has exported 13.75 million tons of corn, more than double U.S. shipments of 5.9 million. Brazil’s corn exports are expected to slow significantly in coming months as soybean exports limit the transportation and port capacity available to move corn exports. However, over the last 8 months of the year, corn exports need to average only 1.3 million tons per month to reach the 24.5 million annual forecast. U.S. corn exports need to increase to an average 2.3 million tons per month to reach the projected 24.0 million. This is a relatively slow pace compared with recent years, but as of January 31, 2013, corn outstanding export sales were 5.5 million tons, down from 10.3 million a year earlier. Based on these figures, U.S. export sales and shipments of corn are expected to increase significantly in coming months.

U.S. corn use for 2012/13 is adjusted slightly this month to reflect diminished export prospects but higher food, seed, and industrial use. Corn ending stocks are projected higher. The projected corn price for 2012/13 is lowered $0.05 per bushel on the low end of the range and $0.35 per bushel on the high end of the range to $6.75 to $7.65 per bushel.

Honey Monthly Update
Washington, D.C.
Feb. 13, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Colony Honey Plant and Market Conditions During Jan. 2013

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD, PA, VA, WV): January continued on the unusual roller coaster temperature ride with severely cold days followed by warmer than normal days. The end of the month nearly set records for warm temperatures. Colonies are generally healthy despite lower than average honey stores. Constant monitoring will be very important for survival this winter with the weather fluctuations. A few hobbyist beekeepers are already reporting a loss of bees. The last few days of January experienced high temperatures in the fifties and sixties and resulted in some foraging of bees, but this was soon followed by a cold front with high winds and more seasonable temperatures.

KENTUCKY: Kentucky experienced continuing cold weather with very limited flight on warmer days. The state had lows of 12 and snow in the mountains along with freezing rain. Beekeepers report of bees flying on warm days, then the temperature drops and the next warm day they are finding dead colonies. In addition to emergency winter feed left on the colonies in the fall, some Keepers are open feeding on warmer days. There are currently very few to no sources of nectar. Beekeepers also reported that colonies are relatively healthy. However, mites are taking their toll. Local meetings and Beekeeping classes continued to be offered throughout the state.

NEW ENGLAND: In New England for the month of January, unseasonal warm winter weather has been the norm with most of the month recording temperatures in the 50s with the advent of the usual deep freeze of bitter cold temperatures, strong winds and sporadic periods of snow and rain fall. Several storms have produced rain and snowfall which resulted in average moisture levels for the entire region. During this month we have short daylight hours and long nights. Even though the average daily temperatures in winter is too cold for flight, we seldom have more than 3 days without a day or more that is warm enough for the bees to take cleansing flights as healthy bees will not defecate in the hive. It’s not unusual to have several consecutive days warm enough for the bees to forage except they cannot find suitable pollen sources in the middle of winter. The only pollen sources reportedly available are Hazelnut catkins.

In New England, experienced beekeepers during fall preparations have made sure that each hive has 60 to 80 pounds of food stores before cold weather. Purportedly with minimum activity and brood rearing, food consumption is usually not heavy until late winter when brood rearing increases. This year is unusual in that with the many days with warm temperatures, bees were out flying with cleansing flight and will be short on winter stores once brood is being raised. There is a major concern particularly this year that starvation will be a factor in winter survival, as many hives could have taken more syrup in the fall.

The occasional break in harsh weather allows keepers to check the status of their hives. In a timely way, keepers will remove the top cover and inner cover in order to locate clusters. Many keepers have found bees on the top frames of the upper hive body. The clusters are tight enough to keep the bees safe. As the temperature drops below 55 degrees F and gets progressively colder, they cluster closer together and generate heat by vibrating their wing muscles without moving their wings as they move to center themselves on the brood. In a strong hive, there will be a two inch layer of bees around the cluster that serves as insulation. This keeps the heat within the cluster so it is not lost as bees inside the cluster continually replace those on the outside so none of them freeze to death. Even when it is freezing outside, the bees keep the temperature around the brood nest at 92 degrees F.

In New England, keepers advice checking the brood areas and replace empty frames with capped honey ones but never physically disturb the cluster. Many keepers are reluctant to open up the hives and chance chilling the bees as most keepers leave enough food as well as bee candy in regard to hives showing light stores. The current mindset is, feed while you can. Keepers report a high feeding success rate when spacers (3/8 inch x 1 inch x 6 inches) are utilized. The spacers allow the bees’ access to the holes in the jar cover. As needed, colonies are being fed with fondant, protein patties, sugar candy, sugar water syrup, high fructose corn syrup and frame feeders.

Many New England keepers recommend hive protection methods such as wrapping hives with tar paper- which has been very popular this year, adding a top insulation board, which will help keep the hive warm and reduce wind infiltration. Condensation from poor ventilation will more adversely affect bees than cold weather. Colonies need to be well ventilated to abate this problem. In New England, hives normally lose 5 to 10% of their population due to normal winter ventilation issues. The increase in daylight hours will signal the queen to begin laying eggs hence a food source is necessary and timely needed. Many keepers are occupied in building, repairing and maintenance of equipment as this is the “down” season for beekeeping. Overall colonies were reported to be in moderate to fairly good condition whereby the reported colonies experiencing good health were reportedly the ones that received regular and aggressive applications of mite treatments. Several keepers reported early losses that they blame on virus conditions as a result of mite and nosema problems found last summer. The New England honey crop this past year showed an average of 38 pounds per colony. Demand at all retail/wholesale outlets remains good and honey sales remains strong. Supplies of new crop locally produced honey remains light.

Prices quoted for retail 1 lb. bottled units were steady at $7.00 to $10.00 mostly $9.50 occasionally higher inclusive of all varieties; for food service operations prices were steady with 5 gallon units at $175.00 to $215.00 mostly $210.00 and occasionally lower for all raw and natural honey depending on variety and quality. Current wholesale prices quoted exclusively for white, cleaned beeswax are steady and for 1lb block units at $5.50 to $5.75 mostly $5.50 and for 50lb block units at $4.50 to $5.00 mostly $4.75. Price quotes taken for bulk orders above 50lbs are $2.20 to $3.50 mostly $3.50 for white/light, cleaned beeswax. Retail white and cleaned beeswax prices reported are $16.00 to $20.00 per pound mostly $18.00.

NEW YORK: Many of the commercial beekeepers have hives transported to the Southeast region of the country for overwintering and pollination of fruit. One beekeeper commented that he cannot remember seeing so few hives in Florida at this time of year. Some oranges are beginning to bloom and there is concern that there are too few bees for proper pollination. A few beekeepers are carefully watching the new “Greening” disease challenging citrus growers, as heavy pesticide residue from treatment could affect hives. Some commercial beekeepers have opted to transport hives to California to pollinate the almond crop, which returns far more ($175-200 per hive) than other competing crops. Some intend to sell the hives in California and not transport back to their primary residence. Overall, some beekeepers have speculated nationwide bee losses averaging between 40-50%. In Western New York, cold temperatures the latter half of the month saw only cluster activity in hives, with supplemental feeding in place.

OHIO: The first half of the month brought relatively mild temperatures; however, sharp drops in temperatures for several days the week of January 20th caused concern for the clusters among beekeepers across the state. After seven days of tight clusters, some losses would be expected without replacements and replenishment. There has continued to be a slight increase in wholesale honey prices again this month. In the Midwest region, including Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota, a poll by Bee Culture magazine reporters indicated light color honey sold bulk in 55-gallon drums increased to $2.12 per pound ($2.07 last month), while amber color increase .08 cents and brought $2.06 per pound. The summary for all US regions ranged from $1.56-2.50 per pound, with an average of $1.95, the same average as the previous month.


Has the Food and Drug Administration done enough to revise its produce safety rule?

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10/31/2014 | Last Updated: 5:15 AM