Market Reports for February 1, 2014

2/1/2014 7:00 AM

PA Weekly
Livestock Trends
Lewisburg, Pa.
Jan. 24, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Combined Livestock Receipts from New Holland, Vintage, Dewart, Middleburg, Greencastle, Lebanon Valley and Waynesburg.

CATTLE: This week 3441; Last week 4012; Last year 4122. CALVES: This week 2415; Last week 2662; Last year 2896. HOGS: This week 1110; Last week 1257; Last year 1245. FEEDER PIGS: This week n/a; Last week 269; Last year 326. LAMBS/SHEEP: This week 2003; Last week 1966; Last year 2414. GOATS: This week 1202; Last week 1103; Last year 1891.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Compared to last week`s market, slaughter steers sold 1.00 to 2.00 higher. Slaughter holsteins sold mostly steady to 1.00 higher and slaughter heifers sold mostly steady. Slaughter cows sold mostly steady to 1.00 to 2.00 higher. Slaughter bulls sold mostly steady to 1.00 higher.

FEEDER CATTLE: Compared to last week’s market, feeder steers sold mostly 5.00 to 10.00 higher. Feeder heifers sold mostly 1.00 to 2.00 higher and feeder bulls sold mostly 10.00 to 15.00 lower.

HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week, holstein bull calves sold mostly 5.00 to 10.00 lower. Holstein heifers sold mostly 15.00 to 20.00 lower.

HOGS: Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 5.00 to 8.00 lower. Sows sold mostly 10.00 lower.

SHEEP/LAMBS: Compared to last week, no lamb report due to the holiday.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week’s sale, slaughter kid goats sold mostly steady to 10.00 lower. Slaughter nanny goats sold mostly 10.00-20.00 lower. Slaughter billies sold mostly 10.00-20.00 lower.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Market at a Glance
Lancaster County Livestock Auction Averages
Prices Per Hundredweight
Jan. 31, 2014
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

STEERS, CHOICE 2-3: This week 145.40; Last week 141.75; Last year 126.30.

HOLSTEIN STEERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 123.35; Last week 122.20; Last year 111.15.

HEIFERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 144.00; Last week 139.75; Last year 124.90.

COWS, BREAKERS, 75-80% LEAN: This week 89.25; Last week 87.80; Last year 76.40.

COWS, BONERS, 80-85% LEAN: This week 86.40; Last week 84.15; Last year 75.55.

BULLS, YG 1: This week 104.10; Last week 100.90; Last year 90.60.

HOGS, 49-54% LEAN, MONDAY: This week 68.75; Last week 64.00; Last year 66.50.

LAMBS, CHOICE/PRIME 80-110 LB: This week 214.00; Last week 221.00; Last year 172.50.

BULL CALVES, #1: This week 144.75; Last week 154.75; Last year 127.75.

KID GOATS, SELECTION 1 (head): This week 167.50; Last week 202.25; Last year 122.50.

New Holland
Monday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 631; Last week 817; Last year 488. CALVES: 469; Last week 433; Last year 390.

When compared to last Monday’s sale, slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher, with lean cows trading as much as 5.00 higher. Slaughter bulls sold sharply higher, mostly 10.00 higher. Cow and bull demand was very good on moderate to heavy supplies for this time of year. Cattle supply included 92 slaughter steers, 63 heifers, 314 cows, 109 bulls, and 53 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 92.00-98.00, High dress 98.50-103.00, Low dress 83.50-91.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 86.00-92.00, High dress 95.00-103.00, Low dress 78.00-85.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 82.00-89.00, High dress 90.50-101.00, Low dress 74.00-81.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 80.00-88.00, High dress 88.00-99.00, Low dress 70.00-79.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 915-1845 lbs 109.00-114.00, high dress 116.00-126.00, low dress 97.00-103.00.

CALVES: No report available from last week to trend Monday’s sale against. Holstein bull calves sold with a firm undertone on good demand. Heifers displayed a weaker undertone. All calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 125-130 lbs 150.00-165.00, 95-120 lbs 160.00-180.00, 90 lbs 120.00-140.00; #2: 100-130 lbs 130.00-165.00, 95 lbs 110.00-140.00, 80-90 lbs 90.00-110.00; #3: 95-120 lbs 70.00-120.00, 75-90 lbs 50.00-80.00; UTILITY: 70-100 lbs 25.00-50.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 95-120 lbs 110.00-125.00; #2: 80-110 lbs 80.00-100.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 65-105 lbs 35.00-75.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Vintage Sales Stables
Monday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 290; Last week 296. CALVES: 137; Last week 174.

Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter steers sold sharply higher, in the range of 6.00-10.00 higher. Holsteins trended mostly 5.00 higher. Demand was very good carrying over the firm rally from late last week. Slaughter cows sold mostly steady. Cattle supply consisted of 166 steers, 13 heifers, 105 cows, 03 bulls, and 03 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1600 lbs 149.00-155.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1250-1650 lbs 143.00-148.00; SELECT 2-3: 1050-1400 lbs 133.00- 140.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1700 lbs 123.00-129.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1200-1650 lbs 113.50-119.00.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1100-1300 lbs 145.00-150.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1050-1350 lbs 136.00-143.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 83.00-88.50, High dress 89.00-91.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 77.00-82.00, High dress 83.00-87.00, Low dress 73.00-75.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 70.00-75.00, High dress 76.00-78.00, Low dress 60.00-67.00.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: No trend due to reporter absence from last week. A weak undertone was noted with moderate demand. All calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 95-130 lbs 125.00-142.00, 85-90 lbs 115.00-127.00; #2: 95-130 lbs 105.00-120.00, 80-90 lbs 100.00-115.00; #3: 80-130 lbs 75.00-100.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587.

NOTICE: Next feeder cattle sale Feb. 7.

Vintage Sales Stables
Tuesday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Jan. 28, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 338, Last week 197, Last year 455. CALVES: 597, Last week 349, Last year 714.

Compared to last week: No comparison on Slaughter Holstein steers due to another very light run. A steady undertone was noted. Slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher compared to last week. Demand was good. Slaughter cattle supplies consisted of 10 steers, 10 heifers, 300 cows, 4 bulls, and 14 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: Few 1550-1750 lbs Individual 122.00; CHOICE 2-3: Few 1450-1650 lbs 115.50-117.50; SELECT 2-3: Few 1350-1650 lbs 106.00-109.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 86.50-90.00, Low dress 83.00-87.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 88.00-92.00, High dress 93.00-96.00, Low dress 83.00-87.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 87.50-92.00, High dress 93.00-95.50, Low dress 80.00-86.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 76.00-81.50, High dress 82.50-88.00, Low dress 69.50-75.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1195-2425 lbs avg dress 97.50, low dress 88.00-94.00.

CALVES: Compared to last Tuesday’s sale, Holstein Bull calves sold mostly steady to 10.00 lower. Heifer calves sold mostly 30.0-40.00 higher on a light test. Demand was good. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 417 head for Tuesday’s sale. All calves are sold by the cwt.

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 111-122 lbs 130.00-141.00, 90-103 lbs 145.00-151.00; #2: 103-114 lbs 137.00-145.00, 90-102 lbs 150.00-157.00, 83 lbs 132.00; #3: 98-111 lbs 110.00-120.00, 96 lbs 133.00, 94-95 lbs 150.00-160.00, 82-83 lbs 100.00-105.00, 74 lbs 40.00; UTILITY: 91-106 lbs 55.00-60.00, 73-83 lbs 25.00-42.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 92-113 lbs 137.00-147.00, 83 lbs 92.00; #2: 83-93 lbs 80.00-112.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 72-81 lbs 30.00-42.00, 63 lbs 17.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTE: Next Feeder Sale Feb. 14.

New Holland Thursday
Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa
Jan. 30, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 916; Last week 701; Last year 1022. CALVES: 684; Last week 678; Last year 621.

Compared to last Thursday's sale, Slaughter steers sold mostly steady compared to last week. Demand was good. Holstein steers sold mostly firm compared to a very light test last week. Heifers sold mostly steady compared to a very light test last week. Slaughter cows sold mostly 2.00-3.00 higher on very good demand. Cattle supplies included 318 slaughter steers; 90 heifers; 446 cows; 27 bulls; and 35 feeder calves. All prices per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1650 lbs 148.00-152.50, Few 153.00-155.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1250-1600 lbs 143.00-147.50; SELECT 2-3: 1250-1600 lbs 136.00-142.50.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1450-1600 lbs 131.00-135.00, individual 140.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1350-1700 lbs 125.00-130.50; SELECT 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 119.00-124.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1100-1300 lbs 146.00-151.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1085-1350 lbs 139.00-144.00; SELECT 2-3: 1100-1350 lbs 132.00-138.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 89.50-93.50, High dress 96.00, Low dress 83.00-88.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 90.00-94.50, Very high 101.00-105.00, High dress 95.00-99.00, Low dress 82.50-89.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 88.00-93.50, High dress 94.00-98.00, Low dress 80.00-87.50; LEAN: 88-90% lean, Avg dress 84.00-89.50, High dress 90.00-94.00, Low dress 75.00-83.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 985-2220 lbs 106.50-109.50, high dress 110.50-115.00, very high dress 117.00-120.00, low dress 95.00-98.00.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week Holstein bulls sold mostly 5.00-10.00 lower. Heifers sold 5.00-10.00 higher. Demand was good for all classes. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 443 head for Thursday's sale. All calves are sold by the cwt.

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 114-128 lbs 147.00-150.00, 94-112 lbs 168.00-173.00, 90-92 lbs 150.00; #2: 112-128 lbs 147.00-153.00, 94-110 lbs 159.00-166.00, 80-85 lbs 152.00; #3: 80-130 lbs 100.00-146.00, 72-78 lbs 60.00; UTILITY: 90-110 lbs 50.00, 60-88 lbs 22.00-30.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 90-120 lbs 120.00-140.00; #2: 80-100 lbs 90.00-110.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 70-105 lbs 20.00-40.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, M717-354-2391. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587.

Lancaster County Weekly Cattle
New Holland, Pa.
Jan. 31, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA

CATTLE: 2175; Last week 2161; Last year 2117. CALVES: 1887; Last week 1634; Last year 1800.

This week in Lancaster County, the steer market managed to hold the rally that brought steer prices over 150.00/cwt last week. This week's trade was very much in line with the trade that transpired at the end of last week.

Demand remained good. Supplies were seasonally light but with a few more consignments than normal as producers move cattle forward in order to capitalize on this record high market. It's unlikely the live markets will stay on top of this peak for much longer as the box beef prices retreated this past week losing 9.30/cwt in the past 6 business days from January 22nd to January 30th.

In addition futures are well below the cash as investors/hedgers see little justification for 150.00/cwt

Live Cattle beyond considering it a short-term anomaly. February Live Cattle futures closed at 142.15/cwt on Thursday.

In addition more cattle became available this week in the Midwest as feedlot show list increased 25,000 head in Texas, Kansas, and Nebraska combined. Direct feedlot trades have been mostly inactive as of Thursday.

Last week's cattle on feed report was considered slightly bearish as more cattle were placed in December than expected by a poll industry estimates. In addition the number of cattle marketed was less than expected. Overall the report showed a 1% increase in placements from December 2012 comparative to December 2013. Marketing was down 0.5%, and total cattle on feed was down 5.4%.

This week Friday, USDA-NASS will be releasing its Cattle Inventory Report which will give indication of the size of the US cattle herd and number of heifers being held for intended replacements. All cattle markets are priced per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1650 lbs 148.00-155.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1250-1650 lbs 143.00-148.00; SELECT 2-3: 1050-1600 lbs 133.00- 142.50.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1700 lbs 131.00-135.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1200-1700 lbs 125.00-130.50; SELECT 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 119.00-124.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1100-1300 lbs 145.00-151.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1050-1350 lbs 136.00-144.00; SELECT 2-3: 1100-1350 lbs 132.00- 138.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 89.50-98.00, High dress 98.50-103.00, Low dress 83.00-89.50; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 86.00-94.50, High dress 94.50-105.00, Low dress 78.00-86.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 82.00-93.50, High dress 93.50-101.00, Low dress 74.00-82.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 76.00-89.50, High dress 89.50-99.00, Low dress 69.50-76.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 915-1845 lbs 106.50-114.00, high dress 114.00-126.00, low dress 95.00-103.00.

CALF SUMMARY: This week in Lancaster County, Holstein Bull calves sold steady to 10.00 higher with good demand. Heifers traded steady to weak with light demand. The Composite Veal Carcass Values for the Northeast United States was quoted from 340.00-361.00/cwt this week, with a weighted average value of 348.83/cwt (Hide-off). All prices per cwt.

MONDAY: HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 125-130 lbs 150.00-165.00, 95-120 lbs 160.00-180.00, 90 lbs 120.00-140.00; #2: 100-130 lbs 130.00-165.00, 95 lbs 110.00-140.00, 80-90 lbs 90.00-110.00; #3: 95-120 lbs 70.00-120.00, 75-90 lbs 50.00-80.00; UTILITY: 70-100 lbs 25.00-50.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 95-120 lbs 110.00-125.00; #2: 80-110 lbs 80.00-100.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 65-105 lbs 35.00-75.00.

TUESDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 111-122 lbs 130.00-141.00, 90-103 lbs 145.00-151.00; #2: 103-114 lbs 137.00-145.00, 90-102 lbs 150.00-157.00, 83 lbs 132.00; #3: 98-111 lbs 110.00-120.00, 96 lbs 133.00, 94-95 lbs 150.00-160.00, 82-83 lbs 100.00-105.00, 74 lbs 40.00; UTILITY: 91-106 lbs 55.00-60.00, 73-83 lbs 25.00-42.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 92-113 lbs 137.00-147.00, 83 lbs 92.00; #2: 83-93 lbs 80.00-112.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 72-81 lbs 30.00-42.00, 63 lbs 17.00.

THURSDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 114-128 lbs 147.00-150.00, 94-112 lbs 168.00-173.00, 90-92 lbs 150.00; #2: 112-128 lbs 147.00- 153.00, 94-110 lbs 159.00-166.00, 80-85 lbs 152.00; #3: 80-130 lbs 100.00-146.00, 72-78 lbs 60.00; UTILITY: 90-110 lbs 50.00, 60-88 lbs 22.00- 30.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 90-120 lbs 120.00-140.00; #2: 80-100 lbs 90.00-110.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 70-105 lbs 20.00-40.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

VA Graded Feeder Cattle Summary
Richmond, Va.
Jan. 23, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

State Graded Weighted Average for Jan 16-22, 2014. Sales at Lynchburg, Radiant and Springlake.

Feeder Cattle: 3,096 head (Steers 940; Heifers 1377; Bulls 779); Last Week 2,750; Last Year 1,161.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 12 head, 300-400 lbs 213.00-224.00; 99 head, 400-500 lbs 181.00-207.00; 164 head, 500-600 lbs 167.00-179.00; 143 head, 600-700 lbs 131.00-172.00; 63 head, 700-800 lbs 145.00-158.50; 7 head, 800-900 lbs 143.50-144.00; 26 head, 900-1000 lbs 143.50-147.00. MED/LGE 2: 25 head, 300-400 lbs 209.00-218.00; 102 head, 400-500 lbs 160.00-199.00; 95 head, 500-600 lbs 152.00-177.50; 70 head, 600-700 lbs 154.00-170.50; 15 head, 700-800 lbs 143.00-160.00. MED/LGE 3: 5 head, 300-400 lbs 180.00-193.00; 34 head, 400-500 lbs 152.00-191.00; 13 head, 500-600 lbs 133.00-165.00; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 128.00-147.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 22 head, 300-400 lbs 205.00-216.00; 162 head, 400-500 lbs 171.00-200.50; 104 head, 500-600 lbs 121.00-168.00; 26 head, 600-700 lbs 136.50-150.00. MED/LGE 1-2 : 9 head, 600-700 lbs 139.50. MED/LGE 2: 55 head, 300-400 lbs 211.00-216.50; 188 head, 400-500 lbs 122.00-200.00; 95 head, 500-600 lbs 140.00-181.00; 21 head, 600-700 lbs 129.00-150.00. MED/LGE 3: 14 head, 400-500 lbs 181.00; 9 head, 500-600 lbs 138.00-143.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 32 head, 300-400 lbs 178.00-184.00; 99 head, 400-500 lbs 162.00-177.00; 192 head, 500-600 lbs 149.00-162.00; 110 head, 600-700 lbs 136.00-146.50; 22 head, 700-800 lbs 136.25-141.50; 5 head, 800-900 lbs 119.00-130.00. MED/LGE 2: 97 head, 300-400 lbs 173.00-184.50; 222 head, 400-500 lbs 118.00-176.50; 179 head, 500-600 lbs 142.00-157.00; 52 head, 600-700 lbs 135.00-145.50; 22 head, 700-800 lbs 81.00-135.50. MED/LGE 3: 51 head, 300-400 lbs 154.00-179.75; 99 head, 400-500 lbs 125.00-171.00; 69 head, 500-600 lbs 124.00-150.00; 11 head, 600-700 lbs 120.00-136.00; 9 head, 700-800 lbs 122.00.

Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

Lynchburg, VA Graded Feeder Cattle
Richmond, Va.
Jan. 27, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA

All prices per cwt.

Feeder Cattle: 1128 (Steers 286; Heifers 512; Bulls 330).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 29 head, 400-500 lbs 198.00-209.50; 47 head, 500-600 lbs 173.00-183.25; 33 head, 600-700 lbs 157.00-171.00; 16 head, 700-800 lbs 150.00-160.00. MED/LGE 2: 13 head, 300-400 lbs 218.00-219.00; 26 head, 400-500 lbs 200.50-210.00; 41 head, 500-600 lbs 180.00-185.75; 23 head, 600-700 lbs 155.00-173.00; 6 head, 700-800 lbs 156.50. MED/LGE 3: 4 head, 300-400 lbs 197.00; 11 head, 400-500 lbs 185.00-205.50; 10 head, 500-600 lbs 158.00-175.50; 4 head, 600-700 lbs 140.00-147.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 7 head, 300-400 lbs 182.75; 29 head, 400-500 lbs 169.00-174.00; 69 head, 500-600 lbs 163.25-165.00; 34 head, 600-700 lbs 143.00-157.75; 16 head, 700-800 lbs 132.25. MED/LGE 2: 42 head, 300-400 lbs 178.00-182.00; 79 head, 400-500 lbs 171.00-173.50; 55 head, 500-600 lbs 160.00-166.00; 26 head, 600-700 lbs 151.00-154.50; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 128.00. MED/LGE 3: 18 head, 300-400 lbs 176.00-176.50; 54 head, 400-500 lbs 160.00-172.00; 23 head, 500-600 lbs 151.00-161.25.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 74 head, 400-500 lbs 175.00-209.25; 25 head, 500-600 lbs 169.50-174.75; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 161.00. MED/LGE 2: 30 head, 300-400 lbs 219.00-221.75; 116 head, 400-500 lbs 180.00-211.50; 36 head, 500-600 lbs 170.00-176.75; 8 head, 600-700 lbs 162.00.

Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

New Holland Weekly Horse Sale
New Holland, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Report Supplied by Auction

44 total head. Overall market steady. Prices per head.

Work: 50.00-400.00.

Driving: 225.00-400.00.

Riding: 150.00-260.00.

Better Riding: 300.00-510.00.

Registered Riding: 500.00.

Ponies: 160.00-200.00.

Large Ponies: 150.00-200.00.

Colts: 110.00-175.00.

New Holland Sheep & Goat Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Reports Supplied by USDA

SHEEP/LAMB RECEIPTS: 1628; Last Monday: 1913; Year Ago: 1606.

GOAT RECEIPTS: 1184; Last Monday: 2120; Year Ago: 1178.

SHEEP/LAMBS: Compared to last week, No comparison due to the holiday shortened day last week, but a firm undertone noted. Slaughter supply consisted of 74 percent lambs, 24 percent slaughter ewes, and 2 percent miscellaneous stock. All sheep and lambs are destined for non-traditional markets. All sheep and lambs are sold by the hundred weight, on actual weights. Non-Traditional Markets:

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED/SHORN: CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 40-60 lbs 222.00-226.00, hair sheep 214.00-226.00, 60-80 lbs 205.00-226.00, hair sheep 200.00- 224.00, 80-110 lbs 200.00-228.00, hair sheep 218.00-222.00, 110-130 lbs 188.00-206.00; CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 40-60 lbs hair sheep 230.00-275.00, 60-80 lbs 232.00- 262.00, hair sheep 224.00-264.00, 90-100 lbs hair sheep 210.00-214.00; GOOD/CHOICE 1-3: 60-80 lbs hair sheep 188.00-192.00, 90-100 lbs 166.00-170.00, 100-110 lbs hair sheep 192.00-196.00, 110-130 lbs 170.00-190.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: Medium Flesh 80-100 lbs hair sheep 100.00-106.00, 120-160 lbs 90.00-110.00, 130-160 lbs hair sheep 110.00-112.00, 160-200 lbs 90.00-110.00, 210-230 lbs 84.00-100.00; UTILITY 1-2: Thin Flesh 90-100 lbs hair sheep 88.00-100.00, 110-120 lbs 72.00-88.00, 120-160 lbs 54.00-72.00, 160-200 lbs 60.00-90.00, 190-200 lbs hair sheep 72.00-76.00; CULL 1-2: 110-140 lbs 50.00-70.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS: 150-200 lbs 70.00-100.00, 200-250 lbs 52.00-90.00.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kid goats sold mostly steady to 10.00 higher. Slaughter Nanny goats sold mostly steady to 10.00 higher. No report on Billies or Wethers due to computer error. Demand was moderate for all classes. Overall quality continues to decline as we get deeper into winter. Slaughter supply consisted of 55 percent Slaughter Kids, 45 percent Slaughter Nannies, and 5 percent bucks/billies and whethers. All Goats are sold by the head on estimated weights.

SLAUGHTER KIDS (hd): SEL 1: 40-60 lbs 140.00-174.00, 60-80 lbs 168.00-195.00, 80-110 lbs 164.00-194.00; SEL 2: 40-60 lbs 100.00-140.00, 60-80 lbs 122.00-168.00, 80-110 lbs 145.00-157.00; SEL 3: 40-60 lbs 68.00-92.00, 60-80 lbs 97.00-120.00, 80-110 lbs 138.00-142.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES (hd): SEL 1: 110-130 lbs 160.00-190.00, 130-140 lbs 180.00-202.00; SEL 2: 110-130 lbs 120.00-158.00; SEL 3: 70-80 lbs 138.00-142.00, 80-110 lbs 135.00-167.00.

Source: USDA Dept. of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Hog Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 1069; Last Week: 1028; Year Ago: 948.

When compared to last week`s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 1.00-3.00 higher. Demand was good. Sows traded mostly steady to 2.00 higher. All prices per cwt.

BARROWS/GILTS: 49-54% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 67.00-71.00, 300-400 lbs 66.00-71.50; 45-49% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 58.00-66.00, 300-400 lbs 60.00-64.00.

SOWS: US 1-3: 300-500 lbs 56.00-60.00, 500-700 lbs 50.00-56.00.

BOARS: 300-700 lbs 17.00-22.00.

Source: USDA Agricultural Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Carlisle Graded Feeder Pig Sale
Carlisle, Pa.
Jan. 24, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Receipts: 861; Last Sale: 766.

All pigs were weighed on arrival and sold by the hundred weight.

US 1-2: 151 head, 30-40 lbs 188.00-230.00; 164 head, 41-50 lbs 154.00-196.00; 20 head, 53-54 lbs 130.00-166.00; 14 head, 62 lbs 132.00; 46 head, 70 lbs 105.00-115.00; 85 head, 83-87 lbs 96.00-122.00; 7 head, 96 lbs 90.00; 74 head, 105-117 lbs 115.00-121.00; 59 head, 121-144 lbs 99.00-112.00.

US 2: 38 head, 34-38 lbs 183.00-230.00; 61 head, 40-48 lbs 140.00-171.00; 24 head, 54-56 lbs 140.00-160.00; 10 head, 65-80 lbs 102.00-120.00; 59 head, 120-121 lbs 108.00.

US 2-3: 24 head, 23-37 lbs 100.00-226.00.

AS IS: 15 head, 28-38 lbs 80.00-165.00; 4 head, 49 lbs 120.00; 6 head, 100-105 lbs 50.00.

NOTE: Next graded feeder pig sale Feb. 21.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

New Holland Weekly Dairy Sale
New Holland, Pa.
Jan. 29, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 292; Last Sale: 150; Last Year: 274.

Compared to last week, dairy cows sold mostly 100.00-200.00 higher compared to a light test last week. Demand was good. Heifers firm compared to a very light test last week. Demand was good. Wednesday’s supply included 97 fresh milking cows, 28 short-bred cows, 26 springing cows, 24 short-bred heifers, 63 springing heifers, 35 open heifers, and 19 bulls. One hundred percent of reported supply Holsteins unless otherwise noted. All sales sold on a per head basis.

FRESH COWS: Supreme: 2000.00-2500.00; Approved: 1700.00-1950.00; Medium: 1450.00-1675.00; Common: 1000.00-1400.00.

SHORT BRED COWS (1-3 months): Supreme: 1650.00-1850.00 few; Approved: 1450.00-1475.00 few; Medium: 1125.00-1250.00; Common: 1000.00-1050.00.

BRED COWS (4-6 months): Supreme: 1500.00-1625.00; Medium: 1250.00-1300.00; Common: 1000.00-1075.00.

SPRINGING COWS (7-9 months): Supreme: 1700.00-1900.00; Approved: 1450.00-1600.00; Medium: 1250.00-1400.00; Common: 850.00-1150.00.

CULL COWS: 725.00-1400.00.

SPRINGING HEIFERS (7-9 months): Supreme: 1700.00-1900.00; Approved: 1450.00-1675.00; Medium: 1275.00-1400.00; Common: 900.00-1200.00.

BRED HEIFERS (4-6 months): Supreme: 1575.00-1625.00; Approved: 1475.00-1550.00; Medium: 1200.00-1300.00; Common: 800.00-875.00.

SHORT BRED HEIFERS (1-3 months): Supreme: 1525.00-1575.00; Appoved: 1325.00-1400.00; Medium: 1125.00-1275.00; Common: 775.00-875.00;

OPEN HEIFERS: 300-600 LBS: Approved: 475.00-585.00; Medium: 385.00-410.00. 600-900 LBS: Approved: 750.00-935.00; Medium: 500.00-725.00. 900-1200 LBS: Supreme: 1175.00-1225.00; Approved: 950.00-1000.00.

BULLS: 300-600 lbs 250.00-550.00, Jersey/Crossbred 135.00-210.00. 600-900 lbs 725.00-1075.00. 900-1200 lbs 1050.00-1225.00. 1200-1500 lbs 1125.00-1200.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

East Fluid Milk & Cream Review
Madison, Wis.
Jan. 29, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Fluid cream and condensed skim prices in tanklot quantities: spot prices of class II cream, dollars per lb. Butterfat: F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast 2.2800-2.5270.

Prices of condensed skim, dollars per lb. solids, F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast - Class II - includes monthly formula prices 2.07-2.10. Northeast - Class III - spot prices 1.62-1.65.

Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of FLORIDA: THIS WK: In 0, Out 53; LAST WK: In 43, Out 0; LAST YR: In 0, Out 0. Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of other SOUTHEASTERN STATES: In 0, Out 0.

Milk production is increasing in the Northeast region. Manufacturing volumes are adequate at most plants. Severe winter weather in the Southeast and coastal regions is having significant impact on milk transports, as they experience major delays, unable to make scheduled drop offs.

Florida Class I demand is active. Milk production levels in Florida are along seasonal trends. Producers are speculating that the impact of winter storm will cause cow stress, resulting in reduced milk volumes. The magnitude of the storm has surged Class I demand causing bottling plant orders to move upward with consumer retail purchases.

Cream demand is expanded with adequate supplies to fulfill contract orders. Spot cream sales are marginal. Cream multiples for all classes ranged 1.20-1.30. Condensed skim supplies remain tight with significant milk supplies being pulled to bottling operations. Some manufactures are directing volumes to Class IV production as they rebuild those inventories.

NASS reports milk production for December 2013 in the 23 reported states totaled 15.7 billion pounds, up slightly from December 2012. Milk production increased in 3 of the 5 listed states in the Eastern region, with a decline in one state, and one state unchanged, compared to year ago levels. Eastern states production increased 0.9% compared to the same month last year. The 5 states showed the following percentage changes in milk production from December 2012 to December 2013 and total milk production this December: Florida, +4.1%, 201 million pounds; New York, +1.6%, 1.1 billion pounds; Pennsylvania, -0.7%, 888 million pounds; Vermont, 0.0%, 218 million pounds; and Virginia, +2.0% at 150 million pounds. Milk cow numbers for December 2013 decreased in 3 of the 5 listed states and increased in 2 states in the region.

SOURCE: Rick Whipp, rick.whipp@ams.usda.gov, 608-278-4151.

Dairy Product Price Highlights
Washington, D. C.
Jan. 29, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

BUTTER prices received for 25 kilogram and 68 pound boxes meeting United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Grade AA standards averaged $1.67 per pound for the week ending January 25, 2014. The United States (US) price per pound increased 4.5 cents from the previous week.

CHEDDAR CHEESE prices received for US 40 pound blocks averaged $2.14 per pound for the week ending January 25, 2014. The price per pound increased 6.9 cents from the previous week. The price for US 500 pound barrels adjusted to 38 percent moisture averaged $2.15 per pound, up 10.7 cents from the previous week.

DRY WHEY prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade standards averaged 60.9 cents per pound for the week ending January 25, 2014. The US price per pound increased 1.3 cents from the previous week.

NONFAT DRY MILK prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade or United States Public Health Service (USPHS) Grade A standards averaged $2.04 per pound for the week ending January 25, 2014. The US price per pound increased 0.8 cents from the previous week.

U.S. Milk Production Update
Washington, D.C.
Jan. 23, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Production Up Slightly

Milk production in the 23 major States during December totaled 15.7 billion pounds, up slightly from December 2012. November revised production at 14.9 billion pounds, was up 0.1 percent from November 2012. The November revision represented a decrease of -32 million pounds or -0.2 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate.

Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,846 pounds for December, 1 pound below December 2012.

The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.50 million head, 6,000 head more than December 2012, and 1,000 head more than November 2013.

October - December Milk Production up 0.4%

Milk production in the United States during the October - December quarter totaled 49.3 billion pounds, up 0.4 percent from the October - December quarter last year.

The average number of milk cows in the United States during the quarter was 9.21 million head, 3,000 head more than the same period last year.

Released January 23, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Organic Dairy Market News
Madison, Wis.
Jan. 20, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA-AMS

Organic Dairy Fluid Overview

NEW ORGANIC DAIRY INITIATIVE. A new initiative was recently announced, with the goal of increasing demand for organic milk, by introducing organic dairy branded packaged food with all organic dairy components into a marketplace where the competition uses few organic dairy components.

A national organic dairy brand which has been procuring organic milk from over 600 organic farms and selling branded organic milk, butter, cheese, cream, yogurt, cream cheese and cottage cheese, has just expanded offerings and entered the market for organic packaged dinners under its organic dairy brand.

The new product category is packaged organic mac and cheese, sold under the organic dairy brand. The new product contains organic cheese, organic whey, organic butter and organic milk. The newly introduced product differs from a number of existing packaged mac and cheese dinners, which feature organic wheat pasta, but frequently not all organic dairy components.

Offering 100% nationally branded organic dairy components in this new product, supported by an existing national distribution network, is a new evolution of the developing organic dairy sector. The product is being placed in national discount chains, food store chains, and natural food stores.

This transition by a national organic dairy brand into a food segment heretofore dominated by non-dairy brands, which procured unbranded dairy ingredients from other firms, represents a new element of retail competition expected to help develop increased demand for organic dairy products: organic dairy branded packaged food.

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIC DAIRY JOINT VENTURE. The same organic dairy firm this month also announced formation of a joint venture with an existing dairy company located in China. A goal of the joint venture is to manufacture, market and sell products including organic dairy products, originating in the United States, in China.

The Chinese joint venture partner has 52 production plants throughout China, as well as a sales network and known brands to Chinese consumers. This joint venture was undertaken by the U.S. organic dairy brand with the expectation of increasing export demand for U.S. produced organic dairy products.

Organic Dairy Retail Overview: Nationally Advertised Price Comparison

The fifth consecutive year opens with organic ad numbers increasing from the first to the second reporting period. Organic ad numbers this period exceed any period since last October. Organic milk ad numbers increased by about 1/3, an increase primarily driven by a tripling in ads for organic milk gallons. Organic yogurt ads declined by about 1/3.

Organic milk accounts for slightly over 3 of every 4 organic dairy ads, with organic yogurt slightly less than 1 of every 4 ads. Organic butter comprised 2% of ads and organic cheese 1%.

Advertising information presented is compiled from nearly 14,000 surveyed newspaper supermarket ads for the period January 13 to January 24, 2014, identifying weekly “specials” and containing organic dairy content. Surveyed ads reflect advertised “specials” and not the range of non-advertised supermarket cooler prices

Complete results of this bi-weekly survey providing additional graphs, tables, and regional delineation, follow at the end of Dairy Market News, or can be accessed at: http://www.ams.usda.gov/ AMSv1.0/DairyRetailReport

REGIONAL ORGANIC DAIRY AD TRENDS. Organic dairy ads appeared in all 6 regions. Regional ad numbers as a percentage of all ads declined in the Midwest and Northwest but increased in the other four regions, nearly tripling in the Northeast.

ORGANIC MILK HALF GALLONS. Organic milk half gallons ad volume is up very slightly from two weeks ago. The U.S. weighted average advertised price of organic milk half gallons is $3.41, down 4 cents from the last reported period. One year ago the national average price was $3.57.

The price range declined 80 cents at the top to $4.19, and 20 cents at the bottom to $2.59. The highest advertised price, $4.19, is in the Northeast and the lowest, $2.59, is in the South Central Region.

ORGANIC/CONVENTIONAL MILK HALF GALLON PRICE SPREAD. The national weighted average organic milk price for half gallons is $3.41 and for conventional half-gallon milk, $1.97. The organicconventional half-gallon price spread is $1.44, down 36 cents from the last period and the narrowest price spread since last July. One year ago the price spread was $1.56.

ORGANIC MILK GALLONS. The national weighted average advertised price for organic gallons is $5.80, up 72 cents from the last reported period. One year ago there were no ads for organic gallons.

ORGANIC MILK 8 OUNCE. 8 ounce organic milk has a national weighted average advertised price of 91 cents, down 9 cents from two weeks ago. One year ago the average price was $1.01. Prices ranged from 79 cents to $1.00.

ORGANIC YOGURT. The majority of ads for organic yogurt are generally split between 4-6 ounce yogurt and 4-6 ounce Greek yogurt, with a smattering of ads for organic 32 ounce yogurt.

The national weighted average advertised price of 4-6 ounce yogurt is $.67, up 17 cents from two weeks ago. There were no ads one year ago.

4-6 ounce organic Greek yogurt has an average price of $1.14, down 2 cents from two weeks ago and down 20 cents from one year ago.

32 ounce organic yogurt has an average price of $3.79, 83 cents above two weeks ago and 76 cents above one year ago.

1# ORGANIC BUTTER. Organic butter ads appeared again after an absence two weeks ago. All ads appeared in the Northeast, priced $4.99. This is $1.00 above the price one year ago.

ORGANIC CHEESE. Ads for 8 ounce organic shredded cheese appeared in the Northeast, all at a price of $3.99. No ads appeared two weeks ago but one year ago the price was $2.50.

SUPERMARKET PRICE COMPARISON: Madison, Wisconsin Prices. Non-advertised organic milk, yogurt, butter and cheese prices in a range of food stores in Madison, Wisconsin are compared for this two week period. Stores included a big-box sized local supermarket; 2 regional chain supermarkets; a smaller but full product line food market; and 2 natural food stores; a national discount big box chain store also selling food; and a large local cooperative grocery store. Organic milk available included 2 national brands, 4 private label store brands, and 3 small local or nearby creamery brands, one featuring non-homogenized milk. Cheese available included 2 national brands, 2 store brands, and cheese from 5 other cheese makers.

SOURCE: www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/dybdairyorganic.pdf.

Average Farm Feed Costs for Handy Reference
Ephrata, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

To provide farmers across the state with a handy reference of commodity input costs in their feeding operations for DHIA record sheets or to develop livestock feed cost data, here are last week’s average costs of various ingredients as compiled from regional reports across the state of Pennsylvania.

Remember, these are averages, so you will need to adjust your figures up or down according to your location and the quality of your crop.

CORN, No. 2: 4.24 bu, 7.59 cwt.

WHEAT, No. 2: 6.19 bu, 10.34 cwt.

BARLEY, No. 3: 3.08 bu, 6.59 cwt.

OATS, No. 2: 3.47 bu, 10.81 cwt.

SOYBEANS, No. 2: 12.65 bu, 21.12 cwt.

EAR CORN: 115.00 ton, 5.75 cwt.

ALFALFA HAY: 225.00 ton, 11.25 cwt.

MIXED HAY: 213.75 ton, 10.69 cwt.

TIMOTHY HAY: 187.50 ton, 9.38 cwt.

PA Grain Report
New Holland, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

When compared to last week’s opening cash bids: Corn and bean markets have firmed mostly from a shift higher in the basis. There is some concern in the wheat markets as another round of cold air pushes its way south across much of the eastern two thirds of US. Areas without adequate snow cover could be at risk. Export markets continue to perform well for corn and beans, although there is still some hesitation from China concerning GMO crops in the US. The South American soybean harvest is expected to slow down some this week due to rain in some of the Western growing regions of Brazil. Soybean production is expected to perform well in much of Brazil and Argentina and will most likely ease export demand for US beans moving forward. Future markets have been lackluster staying range bound for the past couple weeks. All grain and soybean prices are quoted per bushel delivered to the mill or elevator. Bases reflect last Friday’s CME close against Monday morning’s spot cash bids.

Us No 2 Yellow Corn

EASTERN: 4.2000-4.6400, up 11-up 8, -9.5h to 34.5h, up 5.5-up 2.5. CENTRAL: 4.1000-4.6400, up 10-up 13, -19.5h to 34.5h, up 4.5-up 7.5. WESTERN: 3.8400-3.9400, up 3-dn 6, -45.5h to -35.5h, dn 2.5-dn 11.5.

Us No 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat

EASTERN: 6.0100-6.7000, up 35-dn 5, 36h to 105h, up 33.5-dn 6.5. CENTRAL: 6.5700-6.6400, no comp, 92h to 99h, no comp. WESTERN: 5.1800-5.8900, dn 112-dn 62, -47h to 24h, dn 113.5-dn 63.5.

Us No 3 Feed Barley

CENTRAL: 2.7500-3.3000, dn 55-dn 95.

Us No 2 White Oats

CENTRAL: 3.0000-3.2500, dn 70-dn 125, -96h to -71h, dn 66.5-dn 121.5. WESTERN: 3.5000-4.0000, up 30-unch, -46h to 4h, up 33.5-up 3.5.

Us No 2 Soybeans

EASTERN: 12.5500-13.0100, dn 6-up 1, -30h to 16h, up 25.5-up 32.5. CENTRAL: 12.3000-12.6800, dn 10-dn 28, -55h to -17h, up 21.5-up 3.5. WESTERN: 12.2200-12.8700, no comp, -63h to 2h, no comp.

Average Bid Price

EASTERN: Corn 4.42; Wheat 6.43; Soybeans 12.75. CENTRAL: Corn 4.38; Wheat 6.61; Barley 3.08; Oats 3.18; Soybeans 12.49. WESTERN: Corn 3.92; Wheat 5.54; Oats 3.75; Soybeans 12.70.

Chicago Board of Trade month symbols: F January, G February, H March, J April, K May, M June, N July, Q August, U September, V October, X November, Z December.

Source: USDA Market News Service, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-354-2391.

KEY: Region: Bid price, change in price compared to last week, basis, change in basis.

PA Regional Hay
Lewisburg, Pa.
Jan. 27, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and per ton.

Dealer Hay & Straw Market for Eastern, Pa.

No comparisons or prices available.

Summary of Lancaster Area Hay Auctions

Prices per ton. Hay: 164 loads. Straw: 40 loads. ALFALFA: 145.00-370.00. MIXED: 60.00-370.00. TIMOTHY: 110.00-280.00. GRASS: 95.00-380.00. STRAW: 105.00-260.00.

Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions

Prices per ton. Hay: 116 loads; Straw: 25 loads. ALFALFA: 85.00-300.00. MIXED: 85.00-340.00. TIMOTHY: 90.00-270.00. GRASS: 75.00-340.00. STRAW: 75.00-185.00.

Source: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Cattle on Feed Update
Washington, D.C.
Jan. 24, 2014
Report supplied by USDA/NASS

U.S. Cattle on Feed Down 5%

Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.6 million head on January 1, 2014. The inventory was 5 percent below January 1, 2013. The inventory included 6.78 million steers and steer calves, down 4 percent from the previous year. This group accounted for 64 percent of the total inventory. Heifers and heifer calves accounted for 3.73 million head, down 8 percent from 2013.

Placements in feedlots during December totaled 1.68 million, 1 percent above 2012. Net placements were 1.60 million head. During December, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 485,000, 600-699 pounds were 420,000, 700-799 pounds were 391,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 385,000.

Marketings of fed cattle during December totaled 1.74 million, 1 percent below 2012.

Other disappearance totaled 77,000 during December, 4 percent above 2012.

Released January 24, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

U.S. Livestock Slaughter
Washington, D.C.
Jan. 23, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Commercial Red Meat Production Up

Commercial RED MEAT production for the United States totaled 4.14 billion pounds in December, up 3 percent from the 4.00 billion pounds produced in December 2012.

BEEF production, at 2.05 billion pounds, was 1 percent above the previous year. Cattle slaughter totaled 2.56 million head, up 1 percent from December 2012. The average live weight was up 9 pounds from the previous year, at 1,333 pounds.

VEAL production totaled 9.8 million pounds, 1 percent above December a year ago. Calf slaughter totaled 66,500 head, up 2 percent from December 2012. The average live weight was down 2 pounds from last year, at 252 pounds.

PORK production totaled 2.07 billion pounds, up 6 percent from the previous year. Hog slaughter totaled 9.74 million head, up 3 percent from December 2012. The average live weight was up 7 pounds from the previous year, at 283 pounds.

LAMB AND MUTTON production, at 13.2 million pounds, was up 3 percent from December 2012. Sheep slaughter totaled 202,500 head, 7 percent above last year. The average live weight was 130 pounds, down 5 pounds from December a year ago.

January to December 2013 commercial red meat production was 49.2 billion pounds, down 1 percent from 2012. Accumulated beef production was down 1 percent from last year, veal was down 6 percent, pork was down slightly from last year, and lamb and mutton production was down slightly.

December 2012 contained 21 weekdays (including 1 holiday) and 5 Saturdays. December 2013 contained 22 weekdays (including 1 holiday) and 4 Saturdays.

Released January 23, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

U.S. Poultry Slaughter
Washington, D.C.
Jan. 23, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Ready-to-Cook Weight Up 6%

Poultry certified wholesome during December 2013 (ready-to-cook weight) totaled 3.56 billion pounds, up 6 percent from the amount certified in December 2012. The November 2013 revised certified total at 3.49 billion pounds, was down 2 percent from November 2012. The November revision represented an increase of 1.6 million pounds from last month’s preliminary pounds certified.

The preliminary total live weight of all federally inspected poultry during December 2013 was 4.71 billion pounds, up 7 percent from 4.42 billion pounds a year ago. Young chickens inspected totaled 4.11 billion pounds, up 8 percent from December 2012. Mature chickens, at 63.5 million pounds, were up 7 percent from the previous year. Turkey inspections totaled 529 million pounds, down 4 percent from a year ago. Ducks totaled 15.8 million pounds, up 9 percent from last year.

Young chickens slaughtered during December 2013 averaged 5.99 pounds per bird, up 1 percent from December 2012. The average live weight of mature chickens was 5.43 pounds per bird, up 7 percent from a year ago. Turkeys slaughtered during December 2013 averaged 30.7 pounds per bird, down slightly from December 2012.

Ante-mortem condemnations during December 2013 totaled 11.0 million pounds. Condemnations were 0.23 percent of the live weight inspected, as compared with 0.21 percent a year earlier. Post-mortem condemnations, at 36.1 million pounds, were 1.00 percent of quantities inspected, as compared with 0.95 percent a year earlier.

December 2012 contained 21 weekdays (including 1 holiday) and 5 Saturdays. December 2013 contained 22 weekdays (including 1 holiday) and 4 Saturdays.

Released January 23, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Capacity of Refrigerated Warehouses
Washington, D.C.
Jan. 24, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

2013 Summary: Refrigerated Warehouse Capacity Up 2%

Gross refrigerated storage capacity in the United States totaled 4.06 billion cubic feet on October 1, 2013, an increase of 2 percent since the previous survey was conducted two years ago. This was the 48th biennial survey of refrigerated warehouses. The five States with the largest gross warehouse capacity (million cubic feet) were California with 557; Florida, 277; Georgia, 243; Pennsylvania, 243; and Wisconsin, 220.

Usable refrigerated storage capacity was 3.32 billion cubic feet, or 82 percent of the gross space. Usable freezer space was 78 percent of the usable refrigerated space with the remaining 22 percent used as cooler space. Convertible refrigerated space was classified as usable freezer space.

Public warehouse refrigerated storage capacity totaled 3.08 billion gross cubic feet in 2013, accounting for 76 percent of the total storage. Public storage capacity increased 2 percent since 2011 and is 31 percent above the public capacity of ten years ago.

Private and semiprivate warehouse refrigerated capacity totaled 978 million gross cubic feet, or 24 percent of the gross refrigerated space.

Apple Processing Report
Fresno, Calif.
Jan. 23, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Utilized for Processing in 1 ton Units in Appalachian District

JUICE APPLES: Week ending 12/28: 126; Week ending 1/4: 189; Week ending 1/11: 725; Week ending 1/18: 684; 2013 to date: 29029; 2012 to date: 38725; Final 2012: 56428.

CANNER APPLES: Week ending 12/28: 550; Week ending 1/4: 568; Week ending 1/11: 4681; Week ending 1/18: 6849; 2013 to date: 118431; 2012 to date: 102017; Final 2012: 207550.

TOTAL APPLES: Week ending 12/28: 676; Week ending 1/4: 757; Week ending 111: 5406; Week ending 1/18: 7533; 2013 to date: 147460; 2012 to date: 140742; Final 2012: 263978.

Trading

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT(VA, WV, MD, PA): Trading fairly slow. Prices steady. Canners U.S. One f.o.b. packing house or receiving station per cwt Golden Delicious, York, McIntosh 2 3/4 inch minimum $9.00-11.00 few lower, 2 1/2 inch minimum $7.50-10.00, Other Varieties 2 3/4 inch minimum $7.50-9.00, 2 1/2 inch minimum $7.50-8.50 mostly 7.50; Straight loads of juice stock per hundredweight (cwt) U.S. Cider grade various varieties $5.00-6.00 mostly 5.50-6.00. Recent winter storm have caused a few truck delays.

NEW YORK: Movement of apples for juice stock and canners/peelers is expected to remain about the same. Trading is fairly light for Juice Stock and Canners/Peelers. Prices steady. Purchase prices are variety, size and quality dependent. Prices for processing apples on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 F.O.B. packing house or receiving station per cwt. 2013 crop: Juice Stock - (Utilizing All Available Varieties): $5.00-8.00, mostly $5.50-$6.75, occasional higher. Includes previous commitments. Canners/Peelers - (Utilizing All Available Varieties): $7.50 Includes previous commitments.

APPLE JUICE CONCENTRATE IMPORTS PORTS OF ENTRY EAST COAST: Prices for apple juice concentrate for the period January 16 - 22, 2014. Acidity 1.0-2.2 percent weight/weight as malic acid, color 40-70 percent, brix minimum of 70.0, various containers (drums, bins, or bulk liquid packaging). Sales Ex Doc, excludes freight charges, all duties paid, containers included unless otherwise stated. Prices offered to importers per gallon basis in U.S. Dollars. China $8.00-8.50, mostly $8.20-8.35.

Shipping Point Trends

NEW YORK: Shipments 71-96-95 Movement expected to remain about the same. Trading fairly active. Prices slightly lower. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-pound film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum Empire and Red Delicious mostly 16.00-18.00, Cortland and Golden Delicious mostly 16.00-17.00, Gala mostly 18.00-19.00, Macoun and McIntosh mostly 16.00-18.00, Rome mostly 15.00-16.00. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy tray pack McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 23.00-25.00, 100s mostly 22.00-25.00; Empire 80s-88s mostly 22.00-23.00, 100s mostly 20.00-22.00; Cortland 80s-88s mostly 23.00, 100s mostly 22.00- 23.00; Macoun 80s-88s mostly 26.00-27.00, 100s mostly 24.00-25.00; Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy cell pack McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 23.00-25.00, 100s mostly 22.00-25.00; Empire 80s-88s mostly 22.00-23.00, 100s mostly 20.00-22.00.

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD-PA-VA-WV): Shipments 27-29-36, Export 2-3-1 Movement expected about the same. Trading moderate. Prices unchanged. Cartons traypack U.S. Extra Fancy Red Delicious 72s-100s mostly 20.00; Golden Delicious 72s-88s 20.00-22.00, 100s mostly 20.00; McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 25.00; cartons 12 3-pound film bags U.S. Extra Fancy 2 1/2 inch minimum Red Delicious mostly 17.00-18.00, Golden Delicious mostly 17.00-18.00, Granny Smith 20.00-21.00, Red Rome mostly 17.00-18.00 and McIntosh mostly 18.00. Export to El Salvador, Honduras and Israel.

NEW ENGLAND: Shipments 7-9-11 Movement expected to remain about the same. Unofficial prices for Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-pound film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum McIntosh 18.50-22.00. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy tray pack McIntosh 80s-100s 27.50-29.50.

NOTE: For a complete national report, visit marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv, or call 559-487-5178.

Honey Monthly Update
Washington, D.C.
Jan. 24, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Colony, Honey Plant & Market Conditions During December 2013

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD, PA, VA, WV): After a colder than average November, December started out cooler than normal as well. The first reported accumulation of snow occurred on December 8 with 2-5 inches measured depending on area. As the cold temperatures continued, this snowfall remained on the ground for about 8 days. Several other snow showers and more seasonable temperatures occurred throughout the mid part of the month. Very cold temperatures had returned by the end of December. Beekeepers continue to check colonies and maintain supplemental feeding provisions.

KENTUCKY: There is nothing blooming in Kentucky. The colder weather has gotten the bees in cluster and any supplemental feeding is being done in the form of candy boards or the Mountain Camp method. On days when the bees are flying, some beekeepers are providing supplemental feeding in the form of sugar syrup. Because of the colder weather, hives are not being inspected for pests or disease.

NEW ENGLAND: In New England the month of December experienced cold, seasonal temperatures with precipitation either from periods of heavy rainfall or Nor’easter storms producing snowfall which resulted in moderate moisture levels for the entire region. Early December weather was erratic with on and off cold and mild weather, whereby the bees early on had a chance to reorganize themselves, haul out the dead and go on cleansing flights. Nectar and pollen sources have ended however; bees were working off the last late pollen sources which were from fall aster, heath, mum blossoms, perennial bachelor buttons and Johnny jump ups. Rapidly colder conditions have finished all floral food sources for this season.

Over wintering procedures entails installing mouse guards, entrance reducers and insulation boards between inner and outer covers and/or boards under the bottom screens to ensure proper ventilation. In New England all beekeepers have closed up their hives for the winter and bees are snuggled in their hives. Bees are in cluster conditions. The winter is suddenly cold and these cold temperatures are stressful for bees however, snow is a good insulation against the cold. Winter will be about bees having enough food. Many beekeepers are expressing concern that bees are already at the top of the hives; which is extremely early in the winter and that indicates low honey reserves. A second concern is that many bees are being found in front of their hive bodies during the very cold weather, which is also an uncommon sight. Reportedly, low stores coupled with the usual cold, harsh weather of winter in the future will surely mean a high mortality rate for the over wintered population.

As needed, colonies are being feed with fondant, protein patties, sugar candy. In order to add to the stored food that was left after surplus honey was drawn off. It is too late to feed sugar water syrup, high fructose corn syrup and use frame feeders. In New England, the average consumption is 60 lbs of honey throughout the winter. Steady cold weather lowers the rate at which honeybees consume honey stores. If the weather pattern stays cold it won’t hurt the bees as long as the hives have good ventilation. In New England, hives normally lose 5 to 10% of their population due to winter related issues however, the past few years, winter losses are more in the 30% range. Cold weather will not adversely affect bees as much as condensation will. Colonies should be ventilated to abate this problem. Many Northern New England keepers report that bees have exhibited the usually late winter pattern of clustering just under the inner cover. However, clusters are tight enough to keep the bees safe. Keepers have registered early colony losses presumably due to low cluster size, low stores and erratic weather temperature swings. The most important thing in a healthy hive is nutrition. Hives weaken under the stress of protein deficiency. Limited pollen and nectar means less brood and poor nutrition. This year’s honey stores on brood frames are very small although in many cases large quantities of pollen are found. This will likely contribute to creating a greater winter loss as many colonies are light and their winter bees were not developed under the best of conditions.

Most keepers started early in fall preparations and (IPM) integrated pest management programs. Many keepers were very concerned with viral infections in queens coupled with a stronger disease laden varroa mite population that could carry over to next season with another season of queen problems especially with underperforming weak queens. Harvesting and extracting honey is virtually completed. This year’s honey crop numbers have not been finalized as some locations have exhibited very low production. Some yields are half what they usually are. This year’s crop is turning out to be about 40% below average.

Honey sales have been excellent going into the holiday season. Keepers have crafted many products from the fruits of their hives to sell for the holiday season primarily as stocking stuffers such as decorative honey decanters, candles, creams, lip balms and many edible holiday treats. The holiday season brings on an increase demand for local honey with the supply lower than normal. Demand at farmers markets and all retail/wholesale outlets are strong. Reportedly honey sales remains very good and continues to grow in spite of the recent price increases. Supplies of new crop locally produced honey are very short and in some places are scarce. Prices quoted for retail 1 lb. bottled units were $8.50 to $10.50 mostly $10.00, occasionally higher, and 1 Quart bottled units were $18.00 to $20.00 mostly $19.50, occasionally higher, inclusive of all varieties; for food service operations, prices were higher with 5 gallon units at $195.00 to $240.00 mostly $230.00 and occasionally lower for all raw and natural honey depending on variety and quality. Additionally, current prices quoted for 1 Quart bottled units for raw pollen were $28.00 to $30.00 mostly $28.50 and for raw propolis tincture are $16.00 to $18.00 mostly $17.00 for 2 ounce containers. Current wholesale prices quoted exclusively for white, cleaned beeswax are steady and for 1lb block units at $5.50 to $6.00 mostly $5.50 and for 50lb block units at $4.50 to $5.50 mostly $5.00. Price quotes taken for bulk orders above 50lbs are $2.50 to $4.50 mostly $4.00 for white/light, cleaned beeswax. Retail white and cleaned beeswax prices reported are $16.00 to $20.00 per pound mostly $19.00. In the Northeast overall, the wholesale natural and raw honey price has been hovering around $2.50 per pound by the 55 gallon barrel, without any slowing of sales.

NEW YORK: The Finger Lakes region in central New York reported colder weather than previously recorded in the last 20 years! Snow arrived early and provided an insulation layer to the hives, although temperatures remained too cold for bee cleansing flights much of the month. Just before Christmas, a thaw occurred which gave bees a short period of cleansing flights. The beekeeper chatter is prevalent with speculation of high colony losses and strong nuc purchases. Holiday honey and beeswax purchases were exceptional, with higher retail prices, although some believe prices will continue to climb due to the shorter goldenrod flow during the fall months. According to Bee Culture magazine’s monthly regional honey price report, New York retail shelf prices averaged $6.05 for a one-pound jar, and bulk light honey in 55 gallon drums sold to packers and processors averaged $2.50 pound, above the national average of $2.13 pound.

NORTH CAROLINA: Temperatures in North Carolina varied during December, but were mostly above normal with some areas reaching the upper 50s the week ending December 07. Precipitation was mostly normal to above normal with statewide soil moisture levels rated at 2 percent short, 59 percent adequate, and 39 percent surplus the week ending December 28. According to the North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council five counties were reported as being abnormally dry.

The mild temperatures allowed bees to continue foraging into late December. Possible pollen sources include dandelion and ornamental evergreen shrubs such as Mahonia aquifolium (Oregon grape). This was helpful to hives that may have been lacking adequate stores going into winter, but there could be call for concern that the increased activity could have triggered brood production therefore accelerating food consumption which could be problematic if temperatures dip in January and February. It is important that beekeepers continue to monitor stores be checking the weight of the colonies.

According to apiary inspectors losses are still being reported. Increased observations of classic colony collapse, where there simply are no adult bees in the hives, have been reported. Varroa mites and small hive beetles are still present, but mostly inactive at this time. However, small hive beetles can use supplemental feed sources to reproduce and if the hive is weak the beetle population can quickly outnumber the bees and destroy the colony. Monitoring frequently using various methods for a cumulative assessment cannot be stressed enough!

Demand for honey continues to be high and prices are still at a premium. It is thought that local wholesale prices were higher than ever before during the 2013 season.

OHIO: Honey supplies have continued to dwindle and beekeepers expect honey prices to continue to climb sharply by spring time. According to Bee Culture magazine, the average price of a 55 gallon drum of light honey increased 4 cents to $2.13 pound over the previous month. Last year at this time, prices were $1.95 pound. In the Ohio region of the US, prices are currently averaging $2.10 pound for light honey, with current retail shelf prices of $4.75 for 1 pounders. The cold winter temperatures have only afforded 1 or 2 days when bees were able to leave the hives for cleansing flights across northern Ohio. Generally, bees appear to be faring well, although it is too early to tell how well they overwinter by mid to late March.

TENNESSEE: Tennessee has had a wet December. Nothing is blooming at this time. A few beekeepers are reporting losses due to starvation and absconding.

SOURCE: www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/fvmhoney.pdf.

US Peanut Stocks & Processing
Washington, D.C.
Jan. 29, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Shelled Edible Grade Season to Date Utilization Up 5%

Peanut Stocks in Commercial Storage Totaled 4.72 Billion Pounds

Peanut stocks reported in commercial storage on December 31, 2013 totaled 4.72 billion pounds of equivalent farmer stock, compared with 5.57 billion pounds a year ago. This total includes 3.89 billion pounds of actual farmer stock.

Shelled peanuts on hand totaled 770 million pounds of farmer stock equivalent. Roasting stock totaled 60.4 million pounds.

Shelled peanut stocks totaled 579 million pounds of which 549 million pounds were edible grades and 29.6 million pounds were oil stocks. Edible grade stocks by type included 52.6 million pounds of Virginias and Valencias, 465 million pounds of Runners, and 32.1 million pounds of Spanish.

Millings in December totaled 357 million pounds. Millings by type were 62.3 million pounds of Virginias and Valencias, 287 million pounds of Runners, and 8.32 million pounds of Spanish.

Commercial processors utilized 157 million pounds of shelled edible grade peanuts during December. Utilization by type was 100 million pounds for all peanut butter products, 24.3 million pounds for peanut candy, and 31.3 million pounds for peanut snacks. Crushing for oil and cake and meal totaled 40.2 million pounds during the month.

Deliveries under the Government Domestic Feeding and Child Nutrition Programs amounted to 3.64 thousand pounds of peanut butter during December.

Stocks of treated seed on hand December 31, 2013 totaled 1,577,000 pounds, compared with 1,577,000 pounds on November 30, 2013. Of the December total, 229,000 pounds were Virginias and Valencias. November stocks of treated seed included 229,000 pounds of Virginias and Valencias.

Stocks estimates refer to December 31, 2013. All other data are for the month of December.

Special Note

Peanut Stocks and Processing estimates are now available through the NASS Quick Stats database tool. Quick Stats is available on the NASS web site: http://www.nass.usda.gov. Monthly estimates are available beginning with August 2013 and will be updated monthly following the release of the Peanut Stocks and Processing report.


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7/22/2014 | Last Updated: 4:30 PM