Market Reports for February 15, 2014

2/15/2014 7:00 AM

PA Weekly Livestock Trends
Lewisburg, Pa.
Feb. 7, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Combined Livestock Receipts from New Holland, Vintage, Dewart, Middleburg, Greencastle, Lebanon Valley and Waynesburg.

CATTLE: This week 2682; Last week 3207; Last year 3520. CALVES: This week 2724; Last week 2787; Last year 28953. HOGS: This week 1103; Last week 1166; Last year 1215. FEEDER PIGS: This week n/a; Last week n/a; Last year 516. LAMBS/SHEEP: This week 2024; Last week 1701; Last year 1694. GOATS: This week 1379; Last week 1249; Last year 717.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Compared to last week`s market, slaughter steers sold 1.00 to 2.00 higher. Slaughter holsteins sold mostly firm and slaughter heifers sold mostly firm. Slaughter cows sold mostly 3.00 to 5.00 higher. Slaughter bulls sold mostly 2.00 to 4.00 higher.

FEEDER CATTLE: Compared to last week’s market, feeder steers sold mostly 4.00 to 5.00 lower. Feeder heifers sold mostly steady and feeder bulls no trend available.

HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week, holstein bull calves sold mostly 10.00 to 12.00 lower. Holstein heifers sold mostly 3.00 to 4.00 higher.

HOGS: Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 1.00 to 3.00 lower. Sows sold mostly steady to 2.00 higher.

SHEEP/LAMBS: Compared to last week, slaughter lambs traded steady to 10.00 higher. Slaughter ewes traded mostly steady.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week’s sale, slaughter kid goats sold mostly steady to 10.00 higher. Slaughter nanny goats sold mostly 10.00-20.00 lower. No report on billies due to computer error.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Market at a Glance
Lancaster County Livestock Auction Averages
Prices Per Hundredweight
Feb. 14, 2014
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

STEERS, CHOICE 2-3: This week 143.15; Last week 146.65; Last year 125.80.

HOLSTEIN STEERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 122.35; Last week 128.00; Last year 107.55.

HEIFERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 141.60; Last week 146.75; Last year 121.40.

COWS, BREAKERS, 75-80% LEAN: This week 87.55; Last week 89.30; Last year 77.30.

COWS, BONERS, 80-85% LEAN: This week 85.50; Last week 88.45; Last year 76.55.

BULLS, YG 1: This week 108.30; Last week 104.75; Last year 92.15.

HOGS, 49-54% LEAN, MONDAY: This week 73.00; Last week 70.50; Last year 68.50.

LAMBS, CHOICE/PRIME 80-110 LB: This week 219.75; Last week 197.00; Last year 170.50.

BULL CALVES, #1: This week 161.35; Last week 156.50; Last year 147.25.

KID GOATS, SELECTION 1 (head): This week 234.00; Last week 175.00; Last year 141.50.

Lancaster County Weekly Cattle
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 14, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA

CATTLE: 1787; Last week 1742; Last year 2828. CALVES: 1246; Last week 1788; Last year 1692.

This week in Lancaster County, Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow! What a week here in Garden Spot! Six inches of snow from last week still on the ground and Thursday adds another six inches.

Cattle reciepts early in the week were running about average. Thursday New Holland cornered the East Coast market as the only sale operating, this with cattle delivered Wednesday. Prices took a small drop as box beef prices dropped. Overall, the market remained strong with some High Choice and Prime steers bringing $1.50/pound and very high dressing cows bringing over $1.00/pound.

Most sales cancelled for Thursday and the Vintage feeder sale scheduled for Friday night has been postponed until February 28th.

All cattle markets are priced per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4; 1345-1650 lbs 145.00-150.50; CHOICE 2-3; 1210-1635 lbs 140.00-146.00; SELECT 2-3: 1130-1570 lbs 135.00-142.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4; 1450-1600 lbs 127.00-130.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1350-1700 lbs 122.00-126.00; SELECT 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 116.00-121.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1290-1485 lbs 140.00-146.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1200-1400 lbs 136.00-141.00; SELECT 2-3: 1300-1350 lbs 127.00-129.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 88.00-94.00, High dress 88.00-96.00, Low dress 82.00-86.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 84.00-93.50, very high 102.00-104.00, High dress 91.50-100.00, Low dress 78.00-87.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 80.00-92.00, High dress 89.50-97.50, Low dress 72.00-86.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 79.00-89.00, High dress 83.00-92.50, Low dress 71.00-83.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 755-1945 lbs 108.00-114.00, high dress 119.00-128.00, Very high dress 124.00-125.00, low dress 99.00-107.00.

CALF SUMMARY: This week in Lancaster County, Holstein Bull calves sold mostly 20.00-40.00 higher with very good demand. There was no sale Thursday due to adverse winter weather. Heifers traded firm this week with moderate demand. The Composite Veal Carcass Values for the Northeast United States was quoted from 340.00-367.00/cwt last week, with a weighted average value of 350.48/cwt (Hide-off). All prices per cwt.

MONDAY: HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 120-130 lbs 120.00-130.00, 100-115 lbs 140.00-160.00, 80-95 lbs 160.00-180.00; #2; 95-125 lbs 120.00-140.00, 80-90 lbs 130.00-150.00; #3; 80-120 lbs 80.00-110.00; UTILITY; 55-105 lbs 20.00-50.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1; 85-105 lbs 100.00-130.00; #2: 85-110 lbs 60.00-90.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 65-85 lbs 30.00-55.00.

TUESDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1; 122 lbs 141.00, 113 lbs 158.00-165.00, 95-103 lbs 182.00-200.00, 90 lbs 167.00; #2: 116 lbs 169.00, 85-113 lbs 172.00-190.00; #3; 82-109 lbs 120.00-150.00, 73 lbs 90.00; UTILITY: 80-105 lbs 50.00-60.00, 71 lbs 25.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 115 lbs 125.00, 92-102 lbs 147.00-155.00, 85 lbs 132.00; #2: 93-100 lbs 122.00-125.00, 75-84 lbs 72.00-95.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 71 lbs 28.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 72-90 lbs 25.00-47.00.

THURSDAY: No sale due to winter storm

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Monday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 685; Last week 323; Last year 629. CALVES: 443; Last week 119; Last year 371.

Cattle supply was moderate this week after last week’s light run due to a winter storm. Slaughter cows sold mostly 3.00 lower on a more adequate supply. Demand was good despite the lower market. Bulls traded 2.00 higher with good demand. Cattle supply included 105 slaughter steers, 74 heifers, 318 cows, 132 bulls, and 56 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 88.00-94.00, High dress 95.00-88.00, Low dress 83.00-85.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 84.00-89.00, High dress 90.00-94.00, Low dress 78.00-82.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 80.00-85.00, High dress 85.00-86.00, Low dress 72.00-78.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 79.00-82.50, High dress 85.00-87.50, Low dress 71.00-78.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 915-1945 lbs 108.00-114.00, high dress 119.00-128.00, low dress 99.00-107.00.

CALVES: when compared to last week’s light supplies due to weather, bull calves sold uneven with light calves weighing less than 100 lbs trading 20.00-30.00 higher and heavier calves trading 10.00-20.00 lower. Demand was moderate from veal feeders, but good from dairy beef buyers. Not enough receipts from last week to trend heifer values, but a steady undertone was noted on moderate demand. All calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 120-130 lbs 120.00-130.00, 100-115 lbs 140.00-160.00, 80-95 lbs 160.00-180.00; #2: 95-125 lbs 120.00-140.00, 80-90 lbs 130.00-150.00; #3: 80-120 lbs 80.00-110.00; UTILITY: 55-105 lbs 20.00-50.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 85-105 lbs 100.00-130.00; #2: 85-110 lbs 60.00-90.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 65-85 lbs 30.00-55.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Vintage Sales Stables Monday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 258; Last week 83. CALVES: 117; Last week 11.

When compared to last week’s light run due to weather, steers sold 2.00- 4.00 lower with moderate demand. No trend on cows due to limited receipts from the prior week to compare Monday’s sale against. Cattle supply consisted of 136 steers, 06 heifers, 112 cows, 04 bulls, and 00 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1345-1605 lbs 145.50-150.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1210-1635 lbs 142.00-146.00; SELECT 2-3: 1130-1570 lbs 137.00- 142.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1510-1725 lbs 118.00-124.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1380-1620 lbs 108.00-114.00.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1290-1485 lbs 140.00-144.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 82.00-85.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 80.50-85.00, High dress 88.50-90.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 75.50-78.00, High dress 81.50-85.00, Low dress 67.50-72.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1420-2290 lbs 110.00-118.50.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: No trend available due to limited comparable receipts from last week’s light run. A firm undertone was noted on good demand. All calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 90-125 lbs 155.00-172.00; #2: 80-130 lbs 130.00-157.00; #3: 100-115 lbs 105.00-135.00, 80-95 lbs 80.00-110.00; UTILITY: 60-90 lbs 20.00-50.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587.

Vintage Sales Stables Tuesday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
Feb. 11, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 503; Last week 402; Last year 457. CALVES: 686; Last week 895; Last year 667.

Compared to last week: No Slaughter Holstein steers last week for a comparison. A weak undertone was noted. Slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher compared to last week. Demand was good. Slaughter cattle supplies consisted of 61 steers, 42 heifers, 384 cows, 12 bulls, and 4 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1450-1600 lbs 127.00-127.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1350-1700 lbs 122.00-126.00; SELECT 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 116.00-121.50.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 88.00-92.00, High dress 96.00, Low dress 82.00-86.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 87.00-91.50, High dress 92.50-96.00, Low dress 80.00-86.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 85.00-89.50, High dress 93.00-94.00, Low dress 77.00-84.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 77.50-82.50, High dress 83.00-84.50, Low dress 72.00-77.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1200-2360 lbs avg dress 100.50- 102.50, high dress 106.00-112.50, low dress 92.50-96.00.

CALVES: Compared to last Tuesday’s sale, Holstein Bull calves sold mostly 30.00-40.00 higher. Heifer calves sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Demand was good. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 559 head for Tuesday’s sale. All calves are sold by the cwt.

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 122 lbs 141.00, 113 lbs 158.00-165.00, 95-103 lbs 182.00-200.00, 90 lbs 167.00; #2: 116 lbs 169.00, 85-113 lbs 172.00-190.00; #3: 82-109 lbs 120.00-150.00, 73 lbs 90.00; UTILITY: 80-105 lbs 50.00-60.00, 71 lbs 25.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 115 lbs 125.00, 92-102 lbs 147.00-155.00, 85 lbs 132.00; #2: 93-100 lbs 122.00-125.00, 75-84 lbs 72.00-95.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 71 lbs 28.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 72-90 lbs 25.00-47.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Thursday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 13, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 341; Last week 846; Last year 948. CALVES: 0; Last week 763; Last year 540.

Compared to last Thursday's sale, Slaughter steers sold mostly 3.00-4.00 lower compared to last week. Demand was very good. Holstein steers sold mostly weak on a very light test compared to last week. Heifers sold mostly 3.00-4.00 lower on a very light test. Slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher on a very light test. Demand was very good. Most cattle were recieved Wednesday due to severe winter storm Thursday morning. No calf sale. Cattle supplies included 150 slaughter steers; 57 heifers; 74 cows; 19 bulls; and 1 feeder calf. All prices per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1650 lbs 145.00-149.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1250-1600 lbs 140.00-144.50; SELECT 2-3; 1250-1600 lbs 135.00-139.00.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1450-1600 lbs 129.00-130.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1350-1700 lbs 122.50-125.00; SELECT 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 118.00-119.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1100-1300 lbs 143.00-146.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1200-1400 lbs 136.00-141.00; SELECT 2-3: 1300-1350 lbs 127.00-129.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 88.00-93.50, Very high 102.00-104.00, High dress 94.00-100.00, Low dress 82.00-87.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 87.00-92.00, High dress 94.50-97.50, Low dress 83.00-86.00; LEAN: 88-90% lean, Avg dress 86.00-89.00, High dress 92.50, Low dress 72.00-83.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 755-1740 lbs 111.00, high dress 117.00-121.00, very high dress 124.00-125.00, low dress 92.00-100.00.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: No calf sale today due to severe winter storm.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587.

Greencastle Monthly Feeder Cattle Sale
Greencastle, Pa.
Feb. 7, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

All prices per cwt.

Receipts: 726; Last Sale: 482.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 212.50-235.00, 400-500 lbs 191.00-210.00, 500-600 lbs 178.00-191.00, 600-700 lbs 157.00-169.00, 700-800 lbs 156.00-160.00, 800-900 lbs 137.00-148.00, 900-1000 lbs 132.00-133.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-500 lbs 170.00-185.00, 500-700 lbs 140.00-152.50.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 3: 300-500 lbs 105.00-119.00, 700-900 lbs 90.00-107.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-500 lbs 172.50-182.50, 500-600 lbs 150.00-163.00, 600-700 lbs 144.00-156.00, 700-900 lbs 127.00-138.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-500 lbs 152.00-165.00, 500-700 lbs 133.00-146.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 300-500 lbs 190.00-212.50, 500-700 lbs 148.00-158.00, 700-900 lbs 127.00-139.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-500 lbs 152.00-181.00, 500-700 lbs 122.50-138.00.

NOTICE: Next feeder cattle sale March 7.

Source: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

VA Graded Feeder Cattle Summary
Richmond, Va.
Feb. 6, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

State Graded Weighted Average for Jan 30-Feb 05, 2014. Sales at Blackstone, Front Royal, Lynchburg, Radiant and Springlake.

Feeder Cattle: 2354 (Steers 769; Heifers 1006; Bulls 579); Last Week 2,055; Last Year 2,195.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 13 head, 300-400 lbs 127.50-218.00; 78 head, 400-500 lbs 171.00-212.00; 130 head, 500-600 lbs 159.00-187.00; 81 head, 600-700 lbs 150.00-184.50; 79 head, 700-800 lbs 143.00-177.50; 61 head, 800-900 lbs 153.00-156.00. MED/LGE 2: 18 head, 300-400 lbs 190.00-213.50; 72 head, 400-500 lbs 146.00-214.50; 108 head, 500-600 lbs 155.00-184.25; 10 head, 600-700 lbs 148.00-166.00; 8 head, 700-800 lbs 143.00-155.00. MED/LGE 3: 10 head, 300-400 lbs 180.00-189.00; 22 head, 400-500 lbs 145.00-199.50; 17 head, 500-600 lbs 151.00-175.00; 6 head, 600-700 lbs 140.00-154.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 19 head, 300-400 lbs 200.00-215.00; 84 head, 400-500 lbs 167.50-215.00; 72 head, 500-600 lbs 149.00-183.00; 27 head, 600-700 lbs 130.00-158.00. MED/LGE 2: 58 head, 300-400 lbs 175.00-222.00; 160 head, 400-500 lbs 161.00-219.00; 67 head, 500-600 lbs 119.00-173.50; 20 head, 600-700 lbs 130.00-160.00. MED/LGE 3: 15 head, 400-500 lbs 100.00-189.00; 8 head, 500-600 lbs 110.00-156.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 25 head, 300-400 lbs 125.00-190.00; 109 head, 400-500 lbs 151.00-180.00; 127 head, 500-600 lbs 148.00-168.00; 66 head, 600-700 lbs 130.00-162.25; 6 head, 700-800 lbs 132.50-142.00; 5 head, 800-900 lbs 146.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 5 head, 500-600 lbs 156.00. MED/LGE 2: 78 head, 300-400 lbs 130.00-190.50; 155 head, 400-500 lbs 151.00-176.00; 106 head, 500-600 lbs 120.00-161.50; 38 head, 600-700 lbs 112.00-165.00; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 136.50. MED/LGE 3: 63 head, 300-400 lbs 144.00-181.00; 91 head, 400-500 lbs 123.00-170.50; 43 head, 500-600 lbs 125.00-149.50; 12 head, 600-700 lbs 127.00-140.00.

Prices per hundredweight unless otherwise stated. Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786.3947.

Lynchburg, VA Graded Feeder Cattle
Richmond, Va.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA

All prices per cwt.

Feeder Cattle: 1036 (Steers 291; Heifers 455; Bulls 290).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 4 head, 300-400 lbs 209.00; 28 head, 400-500 lbs 204.00-209.00; 43 head, 500-600 lbs 184.00-190.50; 38 head, 600-700 lbs 166.00-170.50; 28 head, 700-800 lbs 147.00-155.00. MED/LGE 2: 7 head, 300-400 lbs 214.50; 23 head, 400-500 lbs 209.75; 31 head, 500-600 lbs 180.00-192.50; 26 head, 600-700 lbs 158.00-168.00; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 147.00. MED/LGE 3: 4 head, 300-400 lbs 182.00-191.00; 29 head, 400-500 lbs 200.00; 8 head, 500-600 lbs 182.50.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 5 head, 300-400 lbs 184.00; 35 head, 400-500 lbs 164.00-175.00; 50 head, 500-600 lbs 158.50-159.75; 30 head, 600-700 lbs 148.00-154.75; 8 head, 700-800 lbs 131.00-136.50. MED/LGE 2: 32 head, 300-400 lbs 180.00-184.50; 62 head, 400-500 lbs 170.00-177.00; 62 head, 500-600 lbs 158.75-162.00; 20 head, 600-700 lbs 145.00-154.50; 6 head, 700-800 lbs 135.50. MED/LGE 3: 21 head, 300-400 lbs 176.50-179.50; 50 head, 400-500 lbs 169.75-172.50; 16 head, 500-600 lbs 159.25; 5 head, 600-700 lbs 139.50.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 12 head, 300-400 lbs 200.00-215.00; 64 head, 400-500 lbs 195.00-209.50; 31 head, 500-600 lbs 171.00; 11 head, 600-700 lbs 151.00. MED/LGE 2: 29 head, 300-400 lbs 206.00-215.50; 74 head, 400-500 lbs 192.00-210.25; 26 head, 500-600 lbs 170.00-175.25.

Prices per hundredweight unless otherwise stated. Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786.3947.

Staunton, VA Feeder Cattle
Richmond, Va.
Feb. 7, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

All prices per cwt unless otherwise stated.

Feeder Cattle: 806 head (Steers 300, Holstein Steers 6, Heifers 350, Bulls 150).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 202.50-235.00, 400-500 lbs 209.00-231.00, 500-600 lbs 176.00-197.00, 600-700 lbs 156.00-174.00, 700-800 lbs 148.00-155.00, 800-900 lbs 139.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-400 lbs 197.50-200.00, 400-500 lbs 172.00-203.00, 500-600 lbs 160.00-175.00, 600-700 lbs 135.00-160.00, 700-800 lbs 133.00; MED/LGE 3: 300-400 lbs 105.00-155.00, 400-500 lbs 85.00-142.50, 500-600 lbs 120.00, 600-700 lbs 112.00-121.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 2-3: 400-500 lbs 92.00-111.00, 600-700 lbs 95.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 192.00-197.50, 400-500 lbs 168.00-187.50, 500-600 lbs 141.00-164.00, 600-700 lbs 148.00-156.00, 700-800 lbs 140.00-153.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-400 lbs 162.00-187.50, 400-500 lbs 147.50-171.00, 500-600 lbs 132.00-155.00, 600-700 lbs 121.00-135.00, 700-800 lbs 137.00-142.00; MED/LGE 3: 300-400 lbs 140.00-152.00, 400-500 lbs 132.00, 500-600 lbs 98.00-111.00, 600-700 lbs 118.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 225.00-233.00, 400-500 lbs 190.00-212.50, 500-600 lbs 157.00-171.00, 600-700 lbs 149.00-153.00, 700-800 lbs 126.00-139.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-400 lbs 187.50, 400-500 lbs 169.00-192.00, 500-600 lbs 155.00-160.00, 600-700 lbs 126.00-144.00, 700-800 lbs 121.00-130.00; MED/LGE 3: 300-400 lbs 92.50, 400-500 lbs 150.00-136.00, 500-600 lbs 110.00-138.00, 600-700 lbs 110.00-120.00.

All prices per hundredweight unless otherwise stated. Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

New Holland Weekly Dairy Sale
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 12, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 821; Last Sale: 175; Last Year: 602.

Compared to last week, dairy cows sold mostly firm compared to a light test last week. Demand was good. Heifers traded mostly steady to 100.00 higher compared to a very light test last week. Demand was good. Wednesday’s supply included 144 fresh milking cows, 16 short-bred cows, 18 springing cows, 234 short-bred heifers, 194 springing heifers, 186 open heifers, and 29 bulls. One hundred percent of reported supply Holsteins unless otherwise noted. All sales sold on a per head basis.

FRESH COWS: Supreme: 2000.00-2500.00; Approved: 1700.00-1975.00; Medium: 1525.00-1675.00; Common: 1150.00-1400.00.

SHORT BRED COWS: (1-3 months): Medium: 1000.00-1200.00.

SPRINGING COWS: (7-9 months): Supreme: 1750.00-1850.00; Approved: 1450.00-1600.00; Medium: 1300.00-1350.00; Common: 1100.00-1300.00.

CULL COWS: 675.00-1350.00.

SPRINGING HEIFERS (7-9 months): Supreme: 1650.00-1900.00; Approved: 1400.00-1625.00; Medium: 1200.00-1350.00; Common: 900.00-1175.00.

BRED HEIFERS: (4-6 months): Supreme: 1550.00-1675.00; Approved: 1350.00-1500.00; Medium: 1075.00-1200.00; Common: 800.00-1000.00.

SHORT BRED HEIFERS: (1-3 months): Supreme: 1425.00-1550.00; Approved: 1275.00-1375.00; Medium: 1100.00-1225.00; Common: 800.00-925.00.

OPEN HEIFERS: 300-600 LBS: Supreme: 550.00-625.00; Approved: 400.00-525.00; Medium: 350.00-400.00; Common: 200.00-300.00. 600-900 LBS: Supreme: 825.00-1000.00; Approved: 750.00-810.00; Medium: 610.00-710.00; Common: 525.00-585.00. 900-1200 LBS: Supreme: 1200.00-1300.00; Approved: 1100.00-1200.00; Medium: 1025.00-1100.00.

BULLS: 600-900 lbs 700.00, Jersey/Crossbred 475.00; 900-1200 lbs 1000.00-1325.00, Jersey/Crossbred 650.00-775.00; 1200-1500 lbs 1125.00-1300.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

East Fluid Milk & Cream Review
Madison, Wis.
Feb. 12, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Fluid cream and condensed skim prices in tanklot quantities: spot prices of class II cream, dollars per lb. Butterfat: F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast 2.1459-2.3698.

Prices of condensed skim, dollars per lb. solids, F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast - Class II - includes monthly formula prices 2.07-2.10. Northeast - Class III - spot prices 1.86-1.89.

Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of FLORIDA: THIS WK: In 0, Out 70; LAST WK: In 0, Out 80; LAST YR: In 0, Out 41. Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of other SOUTHEASTERN STATES: In 0, Out 0.

The Mid-Atlantic and Southeast are set to encounter another winter storm blast. The storms are expected to cause wide spread disruptions and major delays, with pick-ups and deliveries, as milk haulers face unsafe icy and snow covered roads. Manufacturing milk supplies have been scaled back, even with some plants already below their expected levels, due to backlog from previous weeks’ winter storms.

Class I demand has led to increases in intake volumes at most bottling plants, with some plants having as many as 32 loads added. Farm production is increasing across the Southeast but expected to flatten with the increase in cow discomfort level, as episodes of cold winter temperatures take effect.

The Northeast is also experiencing winter storms but without major transportation issues. Manufacturing milk supplies in the Northeast are adequate for the Class I demand.

Production levels are on the upswing in Florida. Some bottlers expressed concern, as the storm shut down several processing plants. Cold weather conditions in the North are increasing the number of seasonal residents into Florida and as a result Class I demand is on the strong side. There were 70 loads exported due to the winter storm’s impact.

Cream supplies are substantial in the region. Spot cream sales are light, with most volumes being cleared through contracts. Cream multiples for all classes ranged from 1.15-1.27. Manufacturers expect a slowing demand to improve as they look ahead to customer Passover dairy needs.

Demand for condensed skim milk remains mixed. Buyer interest is being deterred in some instances by current prices. Supplies of condensed skim milk are ample in the region.

SOURCE: USDA/AMS/Dairy Market News, Madison, Wis. www.ams.usda.gov/dairymarketnews. Daniel Johnson, 608.278.4156.

Dairy Product Price Highlights
Washington, D. C.
Feb. 12, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

BUTTER prices received for 25 kilogram and 68 pound boxes meeting United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Grade AA standards averaged $1.84 per pound for the week ending February 8, 2014. The United States (US) price per pound increased 4.4 cents from the previous week.

CHEDDAR CHEESE prices received for US 40 pound blocks averaged $2.28 per pound for the week ending February 8, 2014. The price per pound increased 5.1 cents from the previous week. The price for US 500 pound barrels adjusted to 38 percent moisture averaged $2.30 per pound, up 6.7 cents from the previous week.

DRY WHEY prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade standards averaged 62.0 cents per pound for the week ending February 8, 2014. The US price per pound increased 0.6 cents from the previous week.

NONFAT DRY MILK prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade or United States Public Health Service (USPHS) Grade A standards averaged $2.07 per pound for the week ending February 8, 2014. The US price per pound increased 0.5 cents from the previous week.

New Holland Hog Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 574; Last Week: 968; Year Ago: 785.

When compared to last week`s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher. Demand was good. Sows traded mostly 1.00-2.00 higher. All prices per cwt.

BARROWS/GILTS: 49-54% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 72.00-78.00, 300-400 lbs 68.00-72.00; 45-49% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 62.00-66.00, 300-400 lbs 65.00-69.00.

SOWS: US 1-3: 300-500 lbs 60.00-65.00, 500-700 lbs 64.00-69.00.

BOARS: 300-700 lbs 18.00-20.50.

Source: USDA Agricultural Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Weekly Horse Sale
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by Auction

70 total head. Overall market steady. Prices per head.

Work: 460.00-700.00.

Driving: 360.00-1175.00.

Riding: 400.00-500.00.

Better Riding: 400.00-575.00.

Registered Riding: 525.00-700.00.

Ponies: 100.00-210.00.

Large Ponies: 100.00-575.00.

Colts: 25.00-75.00.

New Holland Sheep & Goat Auction
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Reports Supplied by USDA

SHEEP/LAMB RECEIPTS: 1555; Last Monday: 2007; Year Ago: 2045.

GOAT RECEIPTS: 1196; Last Monday: 1367; Year Ago: 1465.

SHEEP/LAMBS: Compared to last week, Slaughter lambs traded mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Slaughter ewes traded mostly firm. Slaughter supply consisted of 74 percent lambs, 20 percent slaughter ewes, and 6 percent miscellaneous stock. All sheep and lambs are destined for non-traditional markets. All sheep and lambs are sold by the hundred weight, on actual weights. Non-Traditional Markets:

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED/SHORN: CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 40-60 lbs hair sheep 235.00-266.00, 60-80 lbs hair sheep 230.00-240.00, 80-110 lbs 202.00-227.00, hair sheep 240.00-242.00, 110-125 lbs 208.00-222.00, hair sheep 200.00-202.00; CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 40-60 lbs hair sheep 266.00-310.00, 50-60 lbs 245.00-265.00, 60-80 lbs 254.00-287.00, hair sheep 240.00-290.00, 80-110 lbs 244.00-285.00, hair sheep 234.00-241.00, 110-150 lbs 232.00-257.00; GOOD/CHOICE 1-3: 60-70 lbs hair sheep 172.00-176.00, 70-80 lbs 148.00-152.00, 70-90 lbs hair sheep 155.00-185.00, 100-120 lbs hair sheep 132.00-180.00, 160-180 lbs 148.00-174.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: Medium Flesh 80-100 lbs hair sheep 92.00-94.00, 100-130 lbs hair sheep 105.00-108.00, 130-160 lbs 95.00-105.00, 160-200 lbs 100.00-115.00, 200-240 lbs 90.00- 96.00; UTILITY 1-2: Thin Flesh 110-120 lbs hair sheep 90.00- 94.00, 110-160 lbs 60.00-85.00, 160-180 lbs 70.00-76.00; CULL 1-2: 160-180 lbs 58.00-62.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS: 155 lbs 102.00, 100-150 lbs hair sheep 105.00-170.00, 180-200 lbs 66.00-82.00, 200-250 lbs 72.00- 90.00, 205 lbs hair sheep 80.00.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kid goats sold mostly steady to 10.00 higher. Slaughter Nanny goats sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Slaughter Billies sold 10.00- 20.00 higher. Demand was good for all classes. Overall quality poor. Slaughter supply consisted of 54 percent Slaughter Kids, 34 percent Slaughter Nannies, and 12 percent bucks/billies and whethers. All Goats are sold by the head on estimated weights.

SLAUGHTER KIDS (hd): SEL 1: 40-60 lbs 132.00-176.00, 60-80 lbs 150.00-194.00, 80-110 lbs 160.00-187.00; SEL 2: 40-60 lbs 114.00-122.00, 60-80 lbs 132.00-160.00, 80-110 lbs 132.00- 160.00; SEL 3: 40-60 lbs 84.00-107.00, 60-80 lbs 80.00- 110.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES (hd): SEL 1: 90-120 lbs 145.00- 162.00, 120-135 lbs 162.00-182.00; SEL 2: 80-130 lbs 118.00-142.00, 130-140 lbs 142.00-152.00; SEL 3: 60-80 lbs 70.00-117.00, 80-125 lbs 105.00-142.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES (hd): SEL 1: 125-150 lbs 212.00- 290.00, 150-160 lbs 310.00-325.00; SEL 2: 110-130 lbs 165.00-225.00, 150-160 lbs 168.00-172.00; SEL 3: 90-120 lbs 130.00-145.00.

SLAUGHTER WHETHERS (hd): SEL 1: 60-80 lbs 190.00-200.00, 00-100 lbs 200.00-240.00, 100-160 lbs 235.00-295.00.

Source: USDA Dept. of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Smoker Graded Goat & Sheep Auction
Parkesburg, Pa.
Feb. 7, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

SHEEP: 86; Last sale 691. GOATS: 47; Last sale 304.

When compared to the most recent sale two weeks ago, a light run of sheep and goats on offer. Due to the stark difference in receipts an accurate trend cannot be established, but a firm undertone was noted for both lambs and kid goats. Demand was very good promoted by light supplies across the region, a seasonal norm this time of year. All goats are USDA graded and are co-mingled according to age, weight, sex, and selection grade. All sheep and goats are sold per cwt in their in-weights.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED/SHORN: CHOICE 2-3: 32 head, 50-60 lbs 280.00; 5 head, 60-70 lbs 255.00; 11 head, 70-80 lbs 220.00; 24 head, 80-90 lbs 217.00-228.00; 3 head, 90-110 lbs 218.00-233.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: UTILITY 1-2: 6 head, 160-200 lbs 55.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS: 2 head, 200-300 lbs 78.00.

SLAUGHTER KIDS: SEL 1: 17 head, 50-60 lbs 300.00-310.00. SEL 2: 13 head, 40-50 lbs 292.00; 4 head, 70-80 lbs 270.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES: SEL 1: 1 head, 130-180 lbs 148.00. SEL 2: 4 head, 80-130 lbs 130.00-150.00; 4 head, 130-180 lbs 130.00-138.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES: SEL 2: 2 head, 100-150 lbs 145.00-164.00.

Source: USDA Market News, New Holland, PA. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350.

NOTE: The next graded goat sale will be Feb. 21.

Tenn. Graded Goat & Sheep Sales
Nashville, Tenn.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

02/10/14 Tennessee Livestock Producers Graded Goat and Sheep Sale, Columbia, TN.

Receipts: 443 (333 Goats; 110 Sheep) Last Sale 588.

Goats sold per hundred weight (cwt) unless otherwise noted, weights, actual or estimated. Slaughter Classes:

KIDS: SEL 1: 25-35 lbs 251.00-260.00, 36-50 lbs 250.00-270.00, 51-65 lbs 237.50-250.00, 66-80 lbs 181.00-200.00; SEL 2: 25-35 lbs 190.00-223.00, 36-50 lbs 210.00-217.50, 51-65 lbs 207.00-230.00, 66-80 lbs 160.00-200.00; SEL 3: 25-35 lbs 167.50-180.00, 36-50 lbs 162.50-177.50, 51-65 lbs 152.50, 66-80 lbs 135.00.

YEARLINGS: SEL 2-3: 50-100 lbs 140.00-197.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES: 100.00-119.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES: 70.00-133.00.

KIDS FEEDERS: SEL 3: 24-50 lbs 120.00-167.50.

Slaughter Lambs-Includes all breeds, sold per hundred weight (cwt).

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: CHOICE/PRIME: 40-60 lbs 200.00, 61-80 lbs 173.00-186.00; GOOD: 40-60 lbs 150.00-170.00, 61-80 lbs 150.00-174.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: UTILITY/GOOD: All wgts 50.00-85.00.

Source: Tennessee Dept of Ag-USDA Market News, Nashville, TN. Alex Tolbert, 502-564-0290x238.

NOTE: Next Sale Feb. 24.

Average Farm Feed Costs for Handy Reference
Ephrata, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

To provide farmers across the state with a handy reference of commodity input costs in their feeding operations for DHIA record sheets or to develop livestock feed cost data, here are last week’s average costs of various ingredients as compiled from regional reports across the state of Pennsylvania.

Remember, these are averages, so you will need to adjust your figures up or down according to your location and the quality of your crop.

CORN, No. 2: 4.39 bu, 7.85 cwt.

WHEAT, No. 2: 6.22 bu, 10.39 cwt.

BARLEY, No. 3: 3.37 bu, 7.21 cwt.

OATS, No. 2: 3.60 bu, 11.22 cwt.

SOYBEANS, No. 2: 12.94 bu, 21.60 cwt.

EAR CORN: 116.00 ton, 5.80 cwt.

ALFALFA HAY: 200.00 ton, 10.00 cwt.

MIXED HAY: 188.75 ton, 9.44 cwt.

TIMOTHY HAY: 163.75 ton, 8.19 cwt.

GRASS HAY: 173.00 ton, 8.65 cwt.

PA Grain Report
New Holland, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

When compared to last week’s opening cash bids: Corn prices have risen slightly from the previous week and for the most part in line with the Chicago Board of Trade. Beans on the other hand have advanced at a slower pace than the board, but moved up 30 cents in most areas of Pennsylvania. Beans and corn market have both been supported by good export demand. Wheat prices on the other hand have pushed higher due to weather concerns as many fields in the Midwest were hit by snaps of frigid air without adequate snow to insulate the crop. USDA-NASS released its crop production report today with a few revisions to estimated carry-outs that were a surprise to the trade, but not enough to spark any major moves in the commodities. Estimates for Sept 1st corn carryout were revised 150 million bushels lower to 1.481 billion bushels. Wheat estimates were cut by 50 million bushels and soybeans were left unchanged to total 558 million bushels and 150 million bushels respectively. South American production estimates were revised slightly lower for corn due to dry spots in Argentina, and beans were for the most part unchanged as slight decreases in Argentina were offset by slight increases in Brazil. All grain and soybean prices are quoted per bushel delivered to the mill or elevator. Bases reflect last Friday’s CME close against Monday morning’s spot cash bids.

Us No 2 Yellow Corn: EASTERN: 4.3000-4.7900, up 6-up 10, -14h to 35h, dn 4-unch. CENTRAL: 4.2000-4.7900, up 5, -24h to 35h, dn 5. WESTERN: 4.0000-4.1300, up 16-up 7, -44h to -31h, up 6-dn 3.

Us No 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat: EASTERN: 6.3700-6.8300, up 107-up 96, 59.5h to 105.5h, up 85.5-up 74.5. CENTRAL: 6.3000-6.8400, up 80-up 54, 52.5h to 106.5h, up 58.5-up 32.5. WESTERN: 5.1000-5.9900, unch-up 89, -67.5h to 21.5h, dn 21.5-up 67.5.

Us No 3 Feed Barley: CENTRAL: 3.0000-3.6000, dn 30-dn 20.

Us No 2 White Oats: EASTERN: 3.2000-3.7500, up 20-unch, -116.5h to -61.5h, dn 10.5-dn 30.5. CENTRAL: 3.0000-4.0000, unch-up 20, -136.5h to -36.5h, dn 30.5-dn 10.5. WESTERN: 3.5000-4.5000, unch-up 50, -86.5h to 13.5h, dn 30.5-up 19.5.

Us No 2 Soybeans: EASTERN: 13.0000-13.3100, up 50-up 33, -31.5h to -0.5h, up 1.5-dn 15.5. CENTRAL: 12.0000-13.0000, unch-up 13, -131.5h to -31.5h, dn 48.5-dn 35.5. WESTERN: 12.9700-13.2700, up 11-up 30, -34.5h to -4.5h, dn 37.5-dn 18.5.

Average Bid Price: EASTERN: Corn 4.57; Wheat 6.67; Oats 3.57; Soybeans 13.16. CENTRAL: Corn 4.53; Wheat 6.63; Barley 3.37; Oats 3.34; Soybeans 12.56. WESTERN: Corn 4.06; Wheat 5.37; Oats 3.88; Soybeans 13.09.

Eastern - Contracts: CORN: 4.4000-4.7900, up 10-up 4, -20z to 19z, unch-dn 6. WHEAT: 5.5200-6.0400, up 22-up 17, -53z to -1z, unch-dn 5. SOYBEANS: 10.6200-10.9600, up 22-up 5, -60x to -26x, up 4.5-dn 12.5.

Chicago Board of Trade month symbols: F January, G February, H March, J April, K May, M June, N July, Q August, U September, V October, X November, Z December.

Source: USDA Market News Service, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-354-2391.

KEY: Region: Bid price, change in price compared to last week, basis, change in basis.

PA Regional Hay
Lewisburg, Pa.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and per ton.

Summary of Lancaster Area Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 82 loads. Straw: 8 loads. ALFALFA: 110.00-255.00. MIXED: 80.00-280.00. TIMOTHY: 70.00-245.00. GRASS: 87.00-280.00. STRAW: 190.00-112.00.

Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 75 loads; Straw: 27 loads. ALFALFA: 155.00-280.00. MIXED: 90.00-305.00. TIMOTHY: 110.00-230.00. GRASS: 85.00-240.00. STRAW: 75.00-210.00.

Source: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Monthly Bison Carcass Report
Des Moines, Iowa
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

ACTUAL SLAUGHTER NUMBERS IN FEDERALLY INSPECTED PLANTS (not necessarily inspected) BISON: Week ending 1/04/14: 670; Week ending 1/11/14: 1156; Week ending 1/18/14: 1230; Week ending 1/25/14: 1087; Total: 4,143.

CANADIAN LIVE BISON IMPORTS INTO U.S. FOR JANUARY: Slaughter Male: 436; Slaughter Female: 602; Feeder Male: 313; Feeder Female: 237; Total: 1588.

BISON CARCASSES: Compared to December’s report: Prices were steady for prime bison, regardless of gender. The aged bull price was $10.00 per hundredweight higher while the aged cow prices were steady with last month’s report. Slaughter numbers were 6% above December’s numbers.

BISON MEAT: Compared to December’s report: Fresh bison middle meat prices were higher while frozen middle meats were slightly lower. Prices for end meats were unevenly steady. Prices for ground bison were firm, however prices slid lowe for ground bison patties.

Source: USDA Market News Service, Des Moines, IA. Nina Biensen, 515-284-4460.

U.S. Crop Production
Washington, D.C.
Feb. 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Orange Production Unchanged

The United States all orange forecast for the 2013-2014 season is 7.39 million tons, unchanged from the previous forecast but down 11 percent from the 2012-2013 final utilization. The Florida all orange forecast, at 115 million boxes (5.18 million tons), is unchanged from the previous forecast but down 14 percent from last season’s final utilization. Early, midseason, and Navel varieties in Florida are forecast at 54.0 million boxes (2.43 million tons), unchanged from the previous forecast but down 20 percent from last season. The Row Count Survey conducted on January 28-29, 2014, showed about 75 percent of the Early-Midseason rows and 87 percent of the Navel rows had been harvested. The Florida Valencia orange forecast, at 61.0 million boxes (2.75 million tons), is unchanged from the previous forecast but down 8 percent from last season’s final utilization. California and Texas forecasts are carried forward from January.

Florida frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) yield forecast for the 2013-2014 season is 1.61 gallons per box at 42.0 degrees Brix, unchanged from the January forecast but up 1 percent from last season’s final yield of 1.59 gallons per box. The early-midseason portion is projected at 1.53 gallons per box, up 1 percent from last season’s yield of 1.51 gallons per box. The Valencia portion is projected at 1.69 gallons per box, unchanged from last year’s final yield. All projections of yield assume the processing relationships this season will be similar to those of the past several seasons.

Released February 10, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

U.S. Feed Outlook
Washington, D. C.
Feb. 12, 2014
Reports supplied by USDA/ERS

Higher Projected 2013/14 Corn Exports Leave Carryout Lower

U.S. 2013/14 corn exports are forecast 150 million bushels higher to 1,600 million this month as the export pace picks up in response to attractive corn prices and strong global demand. Ending stocks are projected 150 million bushels lower to 1,481 million as a result. The projected midpoint of the corn price range is raised 10 cents to $4.50 per bushel. The midpoints of the projected farm price ranges for sorghum and barley are raised 5 cents per bushel to $4.25 and $6.05 per bushel, respectively. The midpoint of the oats price range is raised 10 cents per bushel to $3.70 per bushel.

The increase in U.S. corn exports is supported by record-high world corn trade, a lull in competitors’ shipments, and strong U.S. sales. The pace of U.S. corn shipments during the first months of 2013/14 has been much stronger than the previous drought-devastated year, but not particularly strong when compared with other years. However, as of January 30, 2014, outstanding U.S. export sales of corn to the world reached 18.6 million tons, the second largest level in recent decades. Exchange rate and macroeconomic uncertainty, as well as production problems, are slowing the pace of Argentina’s corn exports. Global corn trade in 2013/14 (October-September) is projected up 3.1 million tons this month to a record 112.5 million. The European Union (EU) is increasing exports of wheat and importing corn to replace wheat in feed rations. EU corn imports are raised 1.5 million tons to 10.5 million. The pace of corn purchases supports increases of 0.5 million tons each for Egypt, South Korea, and Mexico.

SOURCE: http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do?documentID=1273.

Honey Monthly Update
Washington, D.C.
Feb. 12, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Colony, Honey Plant And Market Conditions During January, 2014

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD, PA, VA, WV): The arrival of January saw record breaking cold temperatures for a majority of the month. The area had not experienced such cold temperatures since 1984. Several snow storms blanketed the area and stayed on as the temperatures stayed below freezing. The end of the month brought a little relief from the bitter cold and negative digit wind chills as temperatures climbed into the forties. With a low honey supply in the supers and having to rely on supplemental feeding this winter, beekeepers are concerned about losses. As the weather permits in the upcoming month, they will know more about survival rates as they access their colonies conditions.

KENTUCKY: Kentucky has had record cold temperatures for January. There have only been a couple of days when the bees were flying. There are some reports of dead outs but is believed those are due to starvation. There is a little pollen coming in on warmer days that is attributed to Dandelion. Beekeepers are encouraged to provide supplemental feed on those warmer days.

NEW ENGLAND: In New England, seasonal winter weather has been the norm with the usual deep freeze and heavy but sporadic periods of snow fall occurring throughout January. Precipitation in the form of significant snowfall affords the entire region with high moisture levels which should provide ideal conditions in the spring for abundant pollen and nectar sources. It has been very cold and beekeepers are especially concerned about the possibility of dead outs. In the past, these cold winters usually result in heavy losses and small spring clusters and a spring like thaw could really help the bees’ right about now. Additionally, New England has had little snow cover when it has been exceedingly cold in order to insulate the hives. Furthermore, to add to the concern, package bees and Nucs (nucleus hives) from the south may be delayed as the winter has reached many of the southern production areas but we will know more in mid- February when southern queen rearing begins.

During this month, Nor’easter storms have been bombarding New England with heavy snowfall. Keepers have been checking colonies for ample supplies of honey for over wintering. In New England, experienced beekeepers during fall preparations have made sure that each hive has 60 to 80 lbs of food stores before cold weather. As needed, colonies are being fed with fondant, protein patties, and sugar candy, in order to add to any stored food that remained after surplus honey was drawn off. Many keepers are reluctant to open hives and chance chilling the bees as most leave enough food in regard to hives showing light stores. In a timely way, keepers will remove the top cover and inner cover in order to locate clusters. Many beekeepers report that bees have exhibited the usual late winter pattern of clustering just under the inner cover. Moreover, many keepers have found bees on the top frames of the upper hive body. The clusters are tight enough to keep the bees safe. As the temperature drops below 55 degrees F and gets progressively colder, they cluster closer together and generate heat by vibrating their wing muscles without moving their wings, as they move to center themselves on the brood. In a strong hive, there will be two inches of bees around the cluster that serves as insulation. This keeps the heat within the cluster so it is not lost, as bees inside the cluster continually replace those on the outside so that none of them freeze to death. Even when it is freezing outside, the bees keep the temperature around the brood nest at 92 degrees F. In New England, keepers advice checking the brood areas and replace empty frames with capped honey ones but never physically disturb the cluster. The current mindset is-, feed while you can. In this inspection process, check the hives for the weight of the stores. Light weight store conditions require adding granulated sugar or fondant on the inner cover and monitor to see if the bees are utilizing it. Keepers report a high feeding success rate when spacers (3/8 inch x 1 inch x 6 inches) are utilized. The spacers allow the bees, access to the holes in the jar cover. Many New England beekeepers are currently using hive protection methods such as wrapping hives with tar paper and/or adding a top insulation board; which will help keep the hive warm and reduce wind infiltration. Additionally, tilting hives to assist drainage is accomplished by tilting the back end of the hive up and the front end down in order to assist drainage of the bottom board. Condensation from poor ventilation will more adversely affect bees than cold weather. Colonies need to be well ventilated to abate this problem. In New England, hives normally lose 5 to 10% of their population due to normal winter ventilation issues. The increase in daylight hours will signal the queen to begin laying hence a food source is necessary and timely needed.

Many keepers are occupied in building, repairing and maintenance of equipment as this is the “down” season for beekeeping. This is the time to plan for the coming year. New England keepers will be seeking answers to the following questions: How many hives would you like to have? How much equipment will you need? When you have made these decisions you will need to order the bees, queens and equipment.

Overall colonies were reported to be in moderate to fairly good condition whereby the reported colonies experiencing good health were reportedly the ones that received regular and aggressive applications of mite treatments. This year has proved to be a good overall season with light varroa populations, sporadic disease issues and a reasonable honey crop with a commercial estimated average of 45 pounds per production colony. Hobbyists report generally speaking that their colonies have exhibited a mixed bag relative to the amount of honey production reported. It is difficult to generalize the season, however it is the local environment and the work the bees do that determines the quantity, quality, color and taste.

Demand at all retail/wholesale outlets remains good and honey sales remains firm. Prices quoted for retail 1 lb. bottled units were $8.50 to $10.50 mostly $10.00, occasionally higher, and 1 Quart bottled units were $18.00 to $20.00 mostly $19.50, occasionally higher, inclusive of all varieties; for food service operations, prices were higher with 5 gallon units at $195.00 to $240.00 mostly $230.00 and occasionally lower for all raw and natural honey depending on variety and quality.

Additionally, current prices quoted for 1 Quart bottled units for raw pollen were $28.00 to $30.00 mostly $29.00 and for raw propolis tincture are $16.00 to $18.00 mostly $17.50 for 2 ounce containers. Current wholesale prices quoted exclusively for white, cleaned beeswax are steady and for 1lb block units at $5.50 to $6.00 mostly $5.50 and for 50lb block units at $4.50 to $5.50 mostly $5.00. Price quotes taken for bulk orders above 50lbs are $2.50 to $4.50 mostly $4.00 for white/light, cleaned beeswax. Retail white and cleaned beeswax prices reported are $16.00 to $20.00 per pound mostly $19.00. In the Northeast overall, the wholesale natural and raw honey price has been around $2.50 per pound by the 55 gallon barrel.

NEW YORK: Below normal temperatures the past 3-4 weeks has beekeepers concerned with survival rates. Additional feedings have been necessary to sustain hives. There are many novice beekeepers facing some adverse weather conditions thus far this winter, and higher losses could be likely unless extra precautions and care were carried out as winter began. If the cold weather continues into February, March and April, without opportunities for periodic cleansing flights, colony losses will increase. Local honey demand has been steady with some beekeepers out of stock and a strong wholesale market continues. Meanwhile, many beekeepers have been busy placing orders and buying packages in anticipation of higher losses.

NORTH CAROLINA: Temperatures in North Carolina were below normal reaching record lows during January. Many areas were under a Winter Weather Advisory and/or Winter Storm Warning in effect January 28-30 and received measurable snow and sleet. During this time statewide soil moisture levels were rated at 3 percent short, 57 percent adequate, and 40 percent surplus. The North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council reported 5 counties as abnormally dry. The unseasonably cold temperatures and snow made it difficult for beekeepers to inspect hives for losses, but some are expected due to the lingering effects of varroa mites as well as the weather variations. If bees were able to forage during the month they could be seen working ornamental evergreen shrubs and possibly Red Maple in the Coastal Plain. Bees were also seen in bird feeders, saw dust, and grain dust. Commercial beekeepers have been preparing to move bees to California for fruit and tree nut pollination or sales of bees. It is predicted there will be a shortage of queens and packages this season. Demand for honey remains high.

OHIO: Local honey stores are scarce and packers are scrambling to find supplies. Cold temperatures have forced supplemental feedings to minimize bee losses. Extra precautions were implemented by many beekeepers in better insulate hives from higher losses. Prices as high as $3.00 pound wholesale and $5.00 pound for varietals such as star thistle and lynden have been reported; some sellers remain bullish and await higher spring prices.

SOURCE: www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/fvmhoney.pdf.

Organic Dairy Market News
Madison, Wis.
Feb. 7, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA-AMS

Organic Dairy Fluid Overview

ORGANIC NEWS: Some organic dairy farmers in parts of the West continue selling cows and reducing herd size, citing pay prices “too low to keep them.” Factors behind many sales are costs of the continuing drought in parts of the West, as well as the costs of organic feed. These cow sales are believed to be tempering seasonal increases in western organic milk production.

A number of the organic dairy producers selling parts of their herds are described as struggling to survive economically.

Reports from producers indicate that as a general matter, the contracted organic milk pay price in the West is about $4.00 lower than in the Northeast, $26.00 versus $30.00 for each base price. Various producer representatives report anecdotally that organic milk from the West regularly moves into the East because the East does not produce enough to meet demand in the region. Producers are interested in more precise information about the volume of organic milk movements between regions becoming available.

Some producers perceive more effort by some national processors in contracting for added organic capacity in the East, with little interest in expanded contracting in the West.

A national organic dairy brand just reported that during 2013 it added 10 organic farms to the existing 1,800 plus farms already contracted.

MILK PRODUCT SALES: AMS reports total organic milk products sales for November 2013, 193 million pounds, were up 0.7% compared with November 2012 and up 4.3% January through November 2013 compared with the same period of 2012.

Organic whole milk sales for November 2013, 55 million pounds, were up 11.2% compared with November 2012 and up 11.8% January through November 2013 compared with the same period of 2012.

Organic reduced fat milk sales for November, 59 million pounds, were up 15.8% compared with November 2012 and up 13.4% January through November 2013 compared with the same period of 2012.

In contrast and comparison, total conventional milk products sales for November 2013 were down 2.2% compared with November 2012 and down 2.7% January through November 2013 compared with the same period of 2012.

Organic Dairy Retail Overview: Nationally Advertised Price Comparison

ORGANIC DAIRY OVERVIEW. Organic dairy ad numbers declined from the last period, which for several years has been the pattern for the third reporting period of the year. Ad numbers also declined for each of the organic dairy products which tend to be advertised most ad cycles: organic milk as a category as well as half gallons, gallons and 8 ounce; organic yogurt; and organic butter. Ads for organic sour cream appeared for the first time this year.

Organic milk accounts for 60% of organic dairy ads, with organic yogurt 25%. Organic sour cream comprised 12% of ads and organic butter 3%.

Advertising information presented is compiled from nearly 14,000 surveyed newspaper supermarket ads for the period January 27 to February 7, 2014, identifying weekly “specials” and containing organic dairy content. Surveyed ads reflect advertised “specials” and not the range of non-advertised supermarket cooler prices.

Complete results of this bi-weekly survey providing additional graphs, tables, and regional delineation, follow at the end of Dairy Market News, or can be accessed at: http://www.ams.usda.gov/ AMSv1.0/DairyRetailReport

REGIONAL ORGANIC DAIRY AD TRENDS. Organic dairy ads appeared in all 6 regions. Regional ad numbers as a percentage of all organic dairy ads declined in the Midwest, Northeast, Southeast and South Central regions but increased in the Southwest and Northwest.

ORGANIC MILK HALF GALLONS. Organic milk half gallon ad volume is down 28% from two weeks ago. The U.S. weighted average advertised price of organic milk half gallons is $3.59, up 18 cents from the last reported period. One year ago the national average price was $3.75.

The price range increased 80 cents at the top to $4.99, but remained unchanged at the bottom $2.59. The highest advertised price, $4.99, is in the Northeast and the lowest, $2.59, is in the South Central Region.

ORGANIC/CONVENTIONAL MILK HALF GALLON PRICE SPREAD. The national weighted average organic milk price for half gallons is $3.59 and for conventional half-gallon milk, $1.69. The organicconventional half-gallon price spread is $1.90, up 46 cents from the last period. One year ago the price spread was $1.58.

ORGANIC MILK GALLONS. The national weighted average advertised price for organic gallons is $5.09, down 71 cents from the last reported period. One year ago the average price was $6.51. Average prices range from $5.00 in the Northeast and Northwest, to $5.49 in the Midwest.

ORGANIC MILK 8 OUNCE. 8 ounce organic milk has a national weighted average advertised price of 97 cents, up 6 cents from two weeks ago. One year ago the average price was $1.00. Average prices range from 83 cents in the Southeast to $1.00 in the Southwest.

ORGANIC YOGURT. Nearly twice as many ads appear for organic Greek 4-6 ounce yogurt as for 4-6 ounce organic yogurt. Ad numbers for the Greek variety are up from two weeks ago while the standard organic yogurt ad numbers are down.

The national weighted average advertised price of 4-6 ounce Greek yogurt is $1.03, down 11 cents from two weeks ago. One year ago the weighted average advertised price was $1.10. Prices range from $.98 to $1.50, with the highest and lowest prices in the Northeast.

4-6 ounce organic yogurt has an average price of $.61, down 6 cents from two weeks ago but up 3 cents from one year ago. Prices ranged from $.50 to $.89, with the lowest price in the Southeast and the highest in the Southwest.

1# ORGANIC BUTTER. All organic butter ads appeared in the Northeast, priced $4.49. This is $.50 below the price two weeks ago but $.20 above the price one year ago.

ORGANIC SOUR CREAM. Ads for 16 ounce organic sour cream appeared in the Southeast, Southwest and South Central regions, all priced $1.99. No organic sour cream ads appeared two weeks or one year ago.

SUPERMARKET PRICE COMPARISON: Madison, Wisconsin Prices. Non-advertised organic milk, yogurt, butter and cheese prices in a range of food stores in Madison, Wisconsin are compared for this two week period. Stores included a big-box sized local supermarket; 2 regional chain supermarkets; a smaller but full product line food market; and 2 natural food stores; a national discount big box chain store also selling food; and a large local cooperative grocery store. Organic milk available included 2 national brands, 4 private label store brands, and 3 small local or nearby creamery brands, one featuring non-homogenized milk. Cheese available included 2 national brands, 2 store brands, and cheese from 5 other cheese makers.

SOURCE: www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/dybdairyorganic.pdf.

Apple Processing Report
Fresno, Calif.
Feb. 6, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Utilized for Processing in 1 ton Units in Appalachian District

JUICE APPLES: Week ending 1/11: 725; Week ending 1/18: 684; Week ending 1/25: 1251; Week ending 2/1: 1541; 2013 to date: 31821; 2012 to date: 39964; Final 2012: 56428.

CANNER APPLES: Week ending 1/11: 4681; Week ending 1/18: 6849; Week ending 1/25: 3298; Week ending 2/1: 4263; 2013 to date: 125992; 2012 to date: 112153; Final 2012: 207550.

TOTAL APPLES: Week ending 1/11: 5406; Week ending 1/18: 7533; Week ending 1/25: 4549; Week ending 2/1: 5804; 2013 to date: 157813; 2012 to date: 152117; Final 2012: 263978.

Trading

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT(VA, WV, MD, PA): Trading moderate. Prices about steady. Canners U.S. One f.o.b. packing house or receiving station per cwt Golden Delicious, York, McIntosh 2 3/4 inch minimum $9.00-11.00 few lower, 2 1/2 inch minimum $7.50-10.00, Other Varieties 2 3/4 inch minimum $7.50-9.00, 2 1/2 inch minimum $7.50-8.50 mostly 7.50; Straight loads of juice stock per hundredweight (cwt) U.S. Cider grade various varieties $5.50-6.50 mostly 6.00 occasional higher.

NEW YORK: Movement of apples for juice stock and canners/peelers is expected to remain about the same. Trading is fairly light for Juice Stock at slightly higher prices and fairly light for Canners/Peelers. Prices for Juice slightly higher, Canners steady. Purchase prices are variety, size and quality dependent. Prices for processing apples on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 F.O.B. packing house or receiving station per cwt. 2013 crop: Juice Stock - (Utilizing All Available Varieties): $5.00-8.00, mostly $6.00- $7.00, occasional higher. Includes previous commitments. Canners/Peelers - (Utilizing All Available Varieties): $7.50 Includes previous commitments.

APPLE JUICE CONCENTRATE IMPORTS PORTS OF ENTRY EAST COAST: Prices for apple juice concentrate for the period January 30 February 5, 2014. Acidity 1.0-2.2 percent weight/weight as malic acid, color 40-70 percent, brix minimum of 70.0, various containers (drums, bins, or bulk liquid packaging). Sales Ex Doc, excludes freight charges, all duties paid, containers included unless otherwise stated. Prices offered to importers per gallon basis in U.S. Dollars China $8.00-8.50 mostly 8.00-8.35 Offerings very light due to Chinese New Year holiday.

Shipping Point Trends

NEW YORK: Shipments 95-83-83 Movement expected to remain about the same. Trading moderate. Prices generally unchanged. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-pound film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum Empire and Red Delicious mostly 16.00-18.00, Cortland and Golden Delicious mostly 16.00-17.00, Gala mostly 18.00-19.00, Macoun and McIntosh mostly 16.00-18.00, Rome mostly 15.00-16.00. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy tray pack McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 23.00-25.00, 100s mostly 22.00-25.00; Empire 80s-88s mostly 22.00-23.00, 100s mostly 20.00-22.00; Cortland 80s-88s mostly 23.00, 100s mostly 22.00- 23.00; Macoun 80s-88s mostly 26.00-27.00, 100s mostly 24.00-25.00; Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy cell pack McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 23.00-25.00, 100s mostly 22.00-25.00; Empire 80s-88s mostly 22.00-23.00, 100s mostly 20.00-22.00.

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD-PA-VA-WV): Shipments 36-35-35, Export 2-2-3 Movement expected about the same. Trading fairly active. Prices unchanged. Cartons traypack U.S. Extra Fancy Red Delicious 72s-100s mostly 20.00; Golden Delicious 72s-88s 20.00-22.00, 100s mostly 20.00; McIntosh 80s-88s mostly 25.00; cartons 12 3-pound film bags U.S. Extra Fancy 2 1/2 inch minimum Red Delicious mostly 17.00- 18.00, Golden Delicious mostly 17.00-18.00, Granny Smith 20.00-21.00, Red Rome mostly 17.00-18.00 and McIntosh mostly 18.00. Export to Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, India, and Israel.

NEW ENGLAND: Shipments 11-8-7 Movement expected to remain about the same. Unofficial prices for Monday, February 03, 2014 Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-pound film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum McIntosh 18.50-22.00. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy tray pack McIntosh 80s-100s 27.50-29.50.

NOTE: For a complete national report, visit marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv, or call 559-487-5178.


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7/29/2014 | Last Updated: 3:30 PM