Market Reports for July 19, 2014

7/19/2014 7:00 AM

PA Weekly Livestock Trends
Lewisburg, Pa.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Combined Livestock Receipts from New Holland, Vintage, Dewart, Middleburg, Greencastle, Lebanon Valley and Waynesburg.

CATTLE: This Week 3219, Last Week 2575, Year Ago 3168; CALVES: This Week 3151, Last Week 2884, Year Ago 2843; HOGS: This Week 973, Last Week 1340, Year Ago 1454; FEEDER PIGS: This Week 410, Last Week n/a, Year Ago n/a; LAMBS/SHEEP: This Week 861, Last Week 2653, Year Ago 2872; GOATS: This Week 697, Last Week 1674, Year Ago 2673.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Compared to last week`s market, slaughter steers sold mostly 3.00 to 4.00 higher. Slaughter holsteins sold mostly 2.00 to 4.00 higher and slaughter heifers sold 3.00 to 5.00 higher. Slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00 to 3.00 higher. Slaughter bulls sold mostly steady to 1.00 higher.

FEEDER CATTLE: Compared to last week’s market, feeder steers no trend available. Feeder heifers sold mostly 25.00 to 45.00 higher and feeder bulls sold mostly 10.00 to 25.00 higher.

HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week, holstein bull calves sold mostly 25.00 to 35.00 lower. Holstein heifers sold mostly 7.00 to 12.00 lower.

SLAUGHTER HOGS: When compared to last week`s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher on good demand. Sows traded mostly 1.00-2.00 higher. Slaughter boars sold mostly firm.

SHEEP: Compared to last week, Slaughter lambs sold mostly 20.00-30.00 higher. Slaughter ewes sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Demand was good for all classes. The short supply helped to slimulate the market as buyers competed for few quality lambs and ewes offered. Slaughter supply consisted of 81 percent lambs, 10 percent slaughter ewes and 9 percent slaughter bucks. All sheep and lambs are destined for non-traditional markets.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kids sold mostly steady on a very light test. Demand was moderate. Overall quality not as good as previous weeks. Nannies traded mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Reported slaughter supply consisted of 61 percent Slaughter Kids, 31 percent Slaughter Nannies, and 9 percent bucks/billies and whethers.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Market at a Glance
Lancaster County Livestock Auction Averages
Prices Per Hundredweight
July 18, 2014
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler


STEERS, CHOICE 2-3: This week 155.15; Last week 154.25; Last year 122.25.

HOLSTEIN STEERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 144.75; Last week 143.45; Last year 102.75.

HEIFERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 153.65; Last week 152.90; Last year 120.15.

COWS, BREAKERS, 75-80% LEAN: This week 109.50; Last week 109.25; Last year 76.65.

COWS, BONERS, 80-85% LEAN: This week 104.80; Last week 103.30; Last year 74.25.

BULLS, YG 1: This week 128.40; Last week 128.00; Last year 92.60.

HOGS, 49-54% LEAN, MONDAY: This week 88.00; Last week 93.50; Last year 77.50.

LAMBS, CHOICE/PRIME 80-110 LB: This week 203.00; Last week 214.00; Last year 162.00.

BULL CALVES, #1: This week 270.25; Last week 260.65; Last year 114.60.

KID GOATS, SELECTION 1 (head): This week 216.75; Last week 180.00; Last year 153.50.

Lancaster County Weekly Cattle
New Holland, Pa. 
July 18, 2014 
Report Supplied By USDA


CATTLE: 2616; Last week 2942; Last year 2301. CALVES: 1952; Last week 1947; Last year 1792. 

This week in Lancaster County slaughter steers advanced 1.00-2.00 higher holding near the highs established a few weeks ago. Demand has been very good as packers continue to aggressively source cattle to keep plants running at efficient speeds. A large reduction in cow slaughter this year has forced beef processors to buy a greater percentage of steers and heifers to fill the slaughter gap. Cow slaughter has been running 15-20% lower than a year ago week after week since April, and the Year to Date figure is currently 13% below last year. 

Beef Cattle producers and dairy men have little incentive to cull cows with the majority of the cow-calf production areas showing pastures in good to excellent condition. 

Feeder cattle prices are at all-time highs, including Holstein feeders, and milk margins are well into positive territory. With supply working in the favor of a bullish market, demand appears to be complimenting the market as well. 

The box beef markets held over 250.00/cwt for the first half of the week and dropped slightly below the mark on Thursday when Choice cutout values were quoted at 249.81/cwt. The Choice/Select spread has shown little discrepancy in value as Select carcasses were only valued 5.57/cwt under the Choice. 

Mid-July into August is often detrimental to beef demand due to summer heat, but weather has remained mild throughout the populated regions of the northeast keeping the grills fired up longer into the season. Although the primary component sustaining the beef market are short bought retailers who gambled on the notion that beef prices would decline going into the summer and made the decision not to forward purchase. They were caught flat footed in the market and are having to pay up for the limited supply. Australian boneless beef imports have been significantly higher this year to meet the demand for grinding beef. 

Imports from Australia have been running well above last year's rate, with June imports expected to be nearly double that of last year. The substantial increase in supply has done little to phase the market. Cow beef is yet to find its peak and was quoted at 228.83/cwt Thursday according to the national cutter cow cutout value. Domestic 90% lean boneless is approaching 300.00/cwt and was quoted at 294.16/cwt on Thursday. 

Feeder and Fat cattle futures regained some of their loses from last week as the spot market refuse to comply with what the board has to say. Charts and investors are entitled to their opinions, but in the end the spot market holds the most weight, and futures will adjust as contracts near their expiration. Direct cattle trades throughout the Midwest ranged from 155.00-157.00/cwt this week, steady to 1.00 higher than the previous week, and over 5.00/cwt above the August CME board price. All cattle markets are priced per cwt. 

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1600 lbs 157.00-162.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1250-1550 lbs 152.00-158.00; SELECT 2-3: 1100-1500 lbs 145.00- 153.50. 

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 143.50-154.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1300-1650 lbs 137.00-147.00; SELECT 2-3: 1200-1600 lbs 128.00-141.00. 

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 1200-1500 lbs 152.00-158.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1100-1500 lbs 147.00-155.00; SELECT 2-3: 1050-1400 lbs 142.00- 151.00. 

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 104.00-116.00, Low dress 99.00-102.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 107.00-114.00, High dress 115.00-120.00, Low dress 98.00-107.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 102.00-109.00, High dress 109.00-119.50, Low dress 95.00-102.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 92.00-102.00, High dress 102.00-108.00, Low dress 82.00-92.00. 

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 930-2300 lbs 126.00-134.00, high dress 135.50-145.00, low dress 117.00-125.00. 

CALF SUMMARY: This week in Lancaster County, Holstein bull calves sold mostly 25.00-50.00 higher early in the week before declining slightly on Thursday. Demand remains very good on moderate to heavy supplies. Heifers traded mostly steady. The Composite Veal Carcass Values for the Northeast United States was quoted from 371.00-395.00/cwt this week, with a weighted average value of 379.52/cwt (Hide-off). All prices per cwt. 

MONDAY: HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 80-120 lbs 280.00-310.00; #2: 80-120 lbs 250.00-275.00; #3: 125-135 lbs 185.00-235.00, 65-120 lbs 185.00-235.00; UTILITY: 55-105 lbs 70.00-135.00. 

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 80-100 lbs 225.00-300.00; #2: 60-115 lbs 150.00-225.00; JERSEY/CROSSBREDS: 70-100 lbs 75.00-150.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 65-100 lbs 60.00-135.00. 

TUESDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 121 lbs 215.00, 112-113 lbs 235.00-250.00, 85-103 lbs 265.00-307.00; #2: 113-118 lbs 280.00-287.00, 75-103 lbs 280.00-320.00; #3: 105-108 lbs 235.00-240.00, 73-95 lbs 255.00-277.00; UTILITY: 82-105 lbs 70.00-80.00, 63-73 lbs 20.00-35.00. 

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 113 lbs 280.00, 85-102 lbs 320.00-340.00; #2: 84-91 lbs 275.00-300.00; NON TUBING/UTILITY: 83 lbs 75.00, 60-73 lbs 20.00- 45.00. 

THURSDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 114-128 lbs 235.00-249.00, 106-112 lbs 261.00-275.00, 80-104 lbs 290.00-295.00; #2: 106-128 lbs 240.00-269.00, 80-100 lbs 277.00-287.00; #3: 100-130 lbs 220.00, 80-98 lbs 260.00-272.00, 72-88 lbs 240.00; UTILITY: 100-110 lbs 80.00, 80-98 lbs 135.00-190.00, 60-78 lbs 30.00. 

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 330.00-380.00; #2: 86-120 lbs 200.00-290.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 70-90 lbs 50.00-70.00. 

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391. 

New Holland Monday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 725; Last week 625; Last year 719. CALVES: 562; Last week 559; Last year 457.

When compared to last Monday’s sale, slaughter cows sold mostly steady with good demand. Bulls sold 1.00 higher with good demand. Cattle supply included 119 slaughter steers, 98 heifers, 318 cows, 136 bulls, and 54 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 111.00-116.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 108.00-114.00, High dress 116.00-120.00, Low dress 98.00-103.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 104.00-109.00, Low dress 95.00-101.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 93.50-102.00, Low dress 83.00-92.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 930-2300 lbs 126.00-131.50, high dress 136.00-145.00, low dress 120.00-125.00.

CALVES: When compared to last Monday’s sale, a heavy supply of Holstein bull calves sold 25.00-50.00 higher with very good demand. Heifers sold steady with moderate demand. All calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 80-120 lbs 280.00-310.00; #2: 80-120 lbs 250.00-275.00; #3: 125-135 lbs 185.00-235.00, 65-120 lbs 185.00- 235.00; UTILITY: 55-105 lbs 70.00-135.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 80-100 lbs 225.00-300.00; #2: 60-115 lbs 150.00-225.00; JERSEY/CROSSBREDS: 70-100 lbs 75.00-150.00; NON- TUBING/UTILITY: 65-100 lbs 60.00-135.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland-Lancaster County, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350.

Vintage Special Feeder Cattle Sale
Paradise, Pa.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 355; Last Sale: 521.

Compared to the most recent sale two weeks ago feeder steers sold mostly firm. Holstein feeder steers sold mostly steady. Heifers were mostly steady. Demand was good for all classes. overall quality for Friday’s special not as good as previous month. The bulk of the offerings weighed less than 700 lbs. All prices per cwt.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 200-500 lbs 230.00-260.00, 500-700 lbs 215.00-240.00, 700-900 lbs 170.00-195.00, 900-1000lbs 150.00-180.00; MED/LGE 2: 200-500 lbs 175.00-210.00, 500-600 lbs 155.00-195.00, 600-700 lbs 195.00-203.00, 700-900 lbs 165.00-170.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 3: 200-400 lbs 180.00-205.00, 400-600 lbs 150.00-177.00, 600-800 lbs 157.00-165.00, 800-1000lbs 135.00-140.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 200-400 lbs 200.00-237.00, 400-600 lbs 185.00-227.00, 600-800 lbs 157.00-185.00, 800-1000lbs 139.00-165.00; MED/LGE 2: 200-400 lbs 160.00-165.00, 400-600 lbs 160.00-180.00, 600-800 lbs 137.00-155.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 200-400 lbs 222.00-237.00, 400-700 lbs 185.00-235.00, 700-1000lbs 155.00-170.00.

Source: USDA Dept of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-354-2391. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTE: Next Feeder Sale Aug. 8.

Vintage Sales Stables Monday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 235; Last week 236. CALVES: 110; Last week 115.

When compared to last week’s sale slaughter steers sold 2.00 higher with very good demand. Cows sold mostly steady with good demand. Slaughter cattle supply consisted of 170 steers, 14 heifers, 2 bulls, 49 cows and 0 feeder. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1600 lbs 158.50-162.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1250-1550 lbs 154.00-158.00; SELECT 2-3: 1100-1500 lbs 149.00- 153.50.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 144.00-149.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1300-1650 lbs 138.00-139.00; SELECT 2-3: 1200-1600 lbs 133.50-135.00.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 1200-1500 lbs 156.00-158.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1100-1500 lbs 151.00-155.00; SELECT 2-3: 1050-1400 lbs 148.50- 151.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 105.00-109.50, High dress 111.00-116.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 100.50-105.00, Low dress 95.00-99.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 94.00-98.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1200-1700 lbs 121.00-125.00.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: when compared to last week’s sale, Holstein bull calves sold steady to weak with good demand. All calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted. All calves sold per cwt.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 80-120 lbs 250.00-270.00; #2: 80-130 lbs 225.00-250.00; #3: 70-130 lbs 180.00-210.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland-Lancaster County, PA. Levi Geyer 717-406-7350. Matt Everitt 570-490-5587.

NOTE: Monthly Feeder Cattle Special Friday, Aug 8.

Vintage Sales Stables Tuesday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
July 15, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 320; Last week 353; Last year 349. CALVES: 634; Last week 661; Last year 595.

Compared to last week: Slaughter steers and heifers not tested again this week. Slaughter Holstein steers sold weak on a very light test. Demand was good. Slaughter Cows sold steady to 2.00 higher on very good demand. Slaughter bulls sold firm. Demand was good. Slaughter cattle supplies consisted of 19 steers, 14 heifers, 259 cows, 7 bulls, and 21 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1350-1600 lbs 143.50-148.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1350-1500 lbs 137.00-142.50; SELECT 2-3: 1400-1500 lbs 128.00-136.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 104.00-108.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 108.50-112.00, High dress 115.00-118.00, Low dress 102.00-107.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 103.00-107.00, Very high dress 119.50, High dress 108.00-111.50, Low dress 96.00-102.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 94.00-101.00, High dress 102.50-108.00, Low dress 88.00-93.50, Very low dress 83.00-87.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1100-1645 lbs avg dress 130.00-131.00, high dress 145.00, low dress 117.00-118.00.

CALVES: Compared to last Tuesday’s sale, Holstein Bull calves sold mostly 40.00-50.00 higher. Heifer calves sold mostly steady to 10.00 lower. Demand was good. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 432 head for Tuesday’s sale. All calves are sold by the cwt.

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 121 lbs 215.00, 112-113 lbs 235.00-250.00, 85-103 lbs 265.00-307.00; #2: 113-118 lbs 280.00- 287.00, 75-103 lbs 280.00-320.00; #3: 105-108 lbs 235.00-240.00, 73-95 lbs 255.00-277.00; UTILITY: 82-105 lbs 70.00-80.00, 63-73 lbs 20.00-35.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 113 lbs 280.00, 85-102 lbs 320.00-340.00; #2: 84-91 lbs 275.00-300.00; NON TUBING/UTILITY: 83 lbs 75.00, 60-73 lbs 20.00-45.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTE: Next Feeder Sale August 8.

New Holland Thursday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
July 17, 2014 
Report Supplied by USDA


CATTLE: 1066; Last week 927; Last year 730. CALVES: 646; Last week 612; Last year 653. 
Compared to last Thursday's sale, Slaughter steers sold mostly 1.00- 2.00 higher. Slaughter Holsteins sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher compared on a very light test. Demand was very good. Slaughter heifers firm compared to a very light test last week. Slaughter cows sold mostly steady. Demand was good. Cattle supplies included 481 slaughter steers; 108 heifers; 417 cows; 43 bulls; and 17 feeder calves. All prices per cwt. 

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1300-1625 lbs 157.00-162.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1300-1650 lbs 152.00-156.50; SELECT 2-3: 1300-1650 lbs 145.00-151.00. 

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1350-1650 lbs 148.00-154.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1350-1700 lbs 142.00-147.00; SELECT 2-3: 1300-1650 lbs 133.50-141.00.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1250-1450 lbs 152.00-158.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1200-1500 lbs 147.00-150.00; SELECT 2-3: 1200-1500 lbs 142.00-145.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 105.00-109.00, High dress 113.00-115.00, Low dress 99.00-102.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 107.00-112.00, High dress 115.00-116.50, Low dress 98.50-106.00; BONERS:  80-85% lean, Avg dress 102.00-108.00, High dress 109.00-113.00, Low dress 95.00-101.00; LEAN: 88-90% lean, Avg dress 92.00-97.50, High dress 99.00-104.50, Low dress 87.00-91.50,  Very low dress 82.00-86.50. 

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1285-2380 lbs avg dress 128.50-134.00, high dress 135.50-136.50, low dress 123.00-124.00.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week Holstein bull calves sold mostly 20.00-30.00 lower on moderate demand. Heifers sold mostly 20.00-30.00 higher compared to a very light test last week. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 408 head for Thursday's sale. All calves are sold by the cwt. 

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 114-128 lbs 235.00-249.00, 106-112 lbs 261.00-275.00, 80-104 lbs 290.00-295.00; #2: 106-128 lbs 240.00-269.00, 80-100 lbs 277.00-287.00; #3: 100-130 lbs 220.00, 80-98 lbs 260.00-272.00, 72-88 lbs 240.00; UTILITY: 100-110 lbs 80.00, 80-98 lbs 135.00-190.00, 60-78 lbs 30.00. 

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 330.00-380.00; #2: 86-120 lbs 200.00-290.00; NON-TUBING/UTILITY: 70-90 lbs 50.00-70.00. 

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA.  Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350.  John Stacy, 717-354-2391. 

VA Graded Feeder Cattle Summary
Richmond, Va.
July 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

State Graded Weighted Average for Jul 03-09, 2014. Sales at Blackstone, Dublin, Lynchburg, Radiant and Winchester. Prices per hundredweight unless otherwise stated.

Feeder Cattle: 3181 (Steers 1534; Heifers 1358; Bulls 289); Last Week 2,208; Last Year 2,697.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 6 head, 300-400 lbs 250.00-265.00; 65 head, 400-500 lbs 175.00-270.00; 177 head, 500-600 lbs 224.00-241.00; 347 head, 600-700 lbs 207.00-255.00; 95 head, 700-800 lbs 179.00-218.00; 99 head, 800-900 lbs 169.00-211.25; 11 head, 900-1000 lbs 186.00-197.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 84 head, 500-600 lbs 126.50; 22 head, 700-800 lbs 207.00-214.00. MED/LGE 2: 20 head, 300-400 lbs 250.00-277.00; 100 head, 400-500 lbs 225.00-270.75; 162 head, 500-600 lbs 210.00-242.75; 81 head, 600-700 lbs 180.00-228.00; 36 head, 700-800 lbs 190.00-212.00; 11 head, 800-900 lbs 197.00; 7 head, 900-1000 lbs 162.00-185.00. MED/LGE 3: 10 head, 300-400 lbs 178.00-274.00; 28 head, 400-500 lbs 227.50-264.50; 31 head, 500-600 lbs 197.50-237.50; 12 head, 600-700 lbs 130.00-210.00; 8 head, 700-800 lbs 175.00-187.00; 10 head, 800-900 lbs 181.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 2-3: 52 head, 900-1000 lbs 160.25.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 32 head, 400-500 lbs 220.00-277.00; 18 head, 500-600 lbs 197.50-225.00; 13 head, 600-700 lbs 177.00-210.75. MED/LGE 1-2: 5 head, 600-700 lbs 208.50. MED/LGE 2: 37 head, 300-400 lbs 230.00-280.00; 89 head, 400-500 lbs 217.50-278.50; 41 head, 500-600 lbs 190.00-223.25; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 210.50.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 8 head, 300-400 lbs 169.00-249.00; 64 head, 400-500 lbs 210.00-245.00; 105 head, 500-600 lbs 160.00-218.25; 260 head, 600-700 lbs 159.00-240.00; 154 head, 700-800 lbs 170.00-279.50. MED/LGE 1-2: 11 head, 300-400 lbs 239.00-240.00. MED/LGE 2: 49 head, 300-400 lbs 190.00-255.50; 158 head, 400-500 lbs 201.00-241.75; 180 head, 500-600 lbs 176.00-226.75; 65 head, 600-700 lbs 168.00-209.25; 15 head, 700-800 lbs 170.00-185.00. MED/LGE 3: 32 head, 300-400 lbs 180.00-243.50; 78 head, 400-500 lbs 209.00-232.00; 73 head, 500-600 lbs 180.00-221.25; 18 head, 600-700 lbs 183.00-206.00; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 155.00-168.00.

Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786.3947.

Lynchburg, VA Graded Feeder Cattle
Richmond, Va.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA

Prices per hundredweight unless otherwise stated.

Feeder Cattle: 1438 (Steers 565; Heifers 628; Heifers 245).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 18 head, 400-500 lbs 240.00-250.50; 71 head, 500-600 lbs 224.00-230.25; 65 head, 600-700 lbs 224.00-227.50; 16 head, 700-800 lbs 190.00-214.00. MED/LGE 2: 25 head, 300-400 lbs 250.00-269.00; 114 head, 400-500 lbs 250.50-252.00; 82 head, 500-600 lbs 223.50-236.50; 32 head, 600-700 lbs 217.00-226.25; 5 head, 700-800 lbs 193.00. MED/LGE 3: 17 head, 300-400 lbs 230.00-252.00; 25 head, 400-500 lbs 243.75; 26 head, 500-600 lbs 217.00-224.00; 15 head, 600-700 lbs 191.00-200.00; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 175.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 10 head, 400-500 lbs 223.50-228.00; 38 head, 500-600 lbs 208.00-211.75; 33 head, 600-700 lbs 192.00-192.50; 7 head, 700-800 lbs 170.00-179.00. MED/LGE 2: 35 head, 300-400 lbs 235.00-245.50; 111 head, 400-500 lbs 220.00-229.00; 112 head, 500-600 lbs 207.50-216.75; 20 head, 600-700 lbs 190.00-204.00. MED/LGE 3: 40 head, 300-400 lbs 224.00-230.00; 85 head, 400-500 lbs 215.00-222.00; 61 head, 500-600 lbs 201.00-207.25; 14 head, 600-700 lbs 180.00-185.00; 7 head, 700-800 lbs 169.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 28 head, 400-500 lbs 225.50-251.00; 14 head, 500-600 lbs 219.00-226.50; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 208.00. MED/LGE 2: 22 head, 300-400 lbs 242.00-257.00; 95 head, 400-500 lbs 218.00-260.50; 26 head, 500-600 lbs 218.00-223.00; 7 head, 600-700 lbs 208.00.

Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786.3947.

Staunton, VA Feeder Cattle
Richmond, Va.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

All prices per hundredweight unless otherwise stated.

Feeder Cattle: 986 head (Steers 500, Holstein Steers 6, Heifers 300, Bulls 180).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 260.00-295.00, 400-500 lbs 235.00-250.00, 500-600 lbs 219.00-244.00, 600-700 lbs 213.00-231.00, 700-800 lbs 194.00-199.00, 800-900 lbs 187.00-190.00, 900-1000 lbs 165.00, 1000-1100 lbs 130.00-168.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-400 lbs 235.00-240.00, 400-500 lbs 217.00-238.00, 500-600 lbs 209.00-224.00, 600-700 lbs 191.00-216.00, 700-800 lbs 178.00-193.00, 800-900 lbs 182.50-185.00; MED/LGE 3: 300-400 lbs 187.50-200.00, 400-500 lbs 187.00-200.00, 500-600 lbs 125.00-185.00, 600-700 lbs 162.00-185.00, 700-800 lbs 174.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 2-3: 600-700 lbs 154.00, 700-800 lbs 152.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 230.00-245.00, 400-500 lbs 220.00-240.00, 500-600 lbs 216.00-229.00, 600-700 lbs 177.00-205.00, 700-800 lbs 173.00-174.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-400 lbs 221.00-255.00, 400-500 lbs 210.00-230.00, 500-600 lbs 200.00-218.00, 600-700 lbs 167.00-177.00, 700-800 lbs 157.00-162.50; MED/LGE 3: 300-400 lbs 195.00-217.00, 400-500 lbs 162.50-205.00, 500-600 lbs 162.50.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 300-400 lbs 225.00-255.00, 400-500 lbs 230.00-260.00, 500-600 lbs 220.00-250.00, 600-700 lbs 204.00-209.50, 700-800 lbs 165.00-172.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-400 lbs 225.00-235.00, 400-500 lbs 216.00-227.00, 500-600 lbs 210.00-218.00, 600-700 lbs 201.00-205.00; MED/LGE 3: 300-400 lbs 162.00-207.00, 400-500 lbs 198.00-200.00, 500-600 lbs 192.50-197.00.

Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

Tri-State, VA Feeder Cattle Sale
Richmond, Va.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

All prices per hundredweight unless otherwise stated.

Feeder Cattle: 808 head (Steers 275, Holstein Steers 8, Heifers 325, Bulls 200).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 200-300 lbs 292.50, 300-400 lbs 270.00, 400-500 lbs 210.00-250.00, 500-600 lbs 200.00-216.00, 600-700 lbs 190.00-214.00, 700-800 lbs 166.00-200.00, 800-900 lbs 185.00, 900-1000 lbs 167.00, 1000-1100 lbs 124.00; MED/LGE 2: 200-300 lbs 220.00, 300-400 lbs 220.00-241.00, 400-500 lbs 204.00-224.00, 500-600 lbs 188.00-189.00, 600-700 lbs 190.00-214.00, 700-800 lbs 132.00-164.00, 800-900 lbs 174.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 2-3: 200-300 lbs 170.00, 300-400 lbs 106.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 200-300 lbs 225.00-246.00, 300-400 lbs 237.50-243.00, 400-500 lbs 214.00-223.00, 500-600 lbs 190.00-225.00, 600-700 lbs 196.00-200.00, 700-800 lbs 188.50, 800-900 lbs 130.00-165.00; MED/LGE 2: 200-300 lbs 200.00, 300-400 lbs 188.00-200.00, 400-500 lbs 191.00-215.00, 500-600 lbs 201.00-221.50, 600-700 lbs 176.00-196.00, 700-800 lbs 176.00, 800-900 lbs 119.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 200-300 lbs 280.00, 300-400 lbs 230.00-260.00, 400-500 lbs 216.00-237.50, 500-600 lbs 185.00-214.00, 600-700 lbs 170.00-190.00, 700-800 lbs 146.00-160.00, 800-900 lbs 118.00-156.00, 900-1000 lbs 140.00; MED/LGE 2: 200-300 lbs 245.00, 300-400 lbs 228.00, 400-500 lbs 198.00-214.00, 500-600 lbs 189.00-219.00, 600-700 lbs 186.00-194.00, 700-800 lbs 145.00-146.00, 800-900 lbs 130.00.

Price and grade information is reported by VDACS Livestock Marketing and disseminated by Virginia Market News Service. While market reports reflect the majority of cattle at each sale, there are instances where animals do not fit reporting categories and are not included.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange Special Sale
Canandaigua, N.Y.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by Auction

All prices per cwt unless otherwise stated. The prices listed are the top of the market; Prices range down from this according to quality, condition, fill and vaccination.

BEEF STEERS: 301-500 lbs 89.00-250.00, 501-700 lbs 74.00-245.00, 701+ lbs 91.00-202.50.

BEEF HEIFERS: 301-500 lbs 34.00-230.00, 501-700 lbs 80.00-225.00, 701+ lbs 79.00-192.00.

BEEF BULLS: 301-500 lbs 109.00-240.00, 501-700 lbs 100.00-190.00, 701+ lbs 115.00-141.00.

HOLSTEINS: 301-500 lbs 77.00-150.00, 501-700 lbs 110.00-158.00, 701+ lbs 117.00-137.00.

BRED REPLACEMENTS (hd): 590.00-1850.00.

FAMILIES (hd): 925.00-2200.00.

New Holland Hog Auction
New Holland, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 918; Last Week: 835; Year Ago: 909.

When compared to last week`s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 1.00-2.00 higher on good demand. Sows traded mostly steady. Slaughter boars sold mostly firm. All prices per cwt.

BARROWS/GILTS: 54-58% LEAN: 200-300 lbs 97.00-104.00, 300-400 lbs 92.00-96.00; 49-54% LEAN: 200-300 lbs 90.00-96.00, 300-400 lbs 80.00-83.00.

SOWS: US 1-3: 300-500 lbs 70.00-75.00, 500-700 lbs 74.00-76.50.

BOARS: 400-720 lbs 40.50-41.00.

Source: USDA Agricultural Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer 717-406-7350 John Stacy 717-354-2391.

New Holland Feeder Pig Auction
New Holland, Pa.
July 16, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 124; Last Sale: 410.

When compared to the most recent sale, feeder pigs sold mostly 50.00 lower. Supplies were light. Prices pulled off their highs brought on prior to the 4th of July holiday. Demand was light to moderate. All feeder pigs are sold per cwt.

US 1-2: 112 head, 20-40 lbs 200.00-260.00; 8 head, 100-115 lbs 150.00-160.00.

Source: USDA Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTE: Next Sale Wednesday Aug. 6.

New Holland Weekly Horse Sale
New Holland, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied by Auction

153 total head. Overall market steady. Prices per head.

Work: 1000.00-1850.00.

Driving: 400.00-875.00.

Riding: 300.00-425.00.

Better Riding: 810.00-3450.00.

Registered Riding: 400.00-1500.00.

Ponies: 135.00-500.00.

Large Ponies: 425.00-1400.00.

New Holland Sheep & Goat Auction
New Holland, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Reports Supplied by USDA

SHEEP/LAMB RECEIPTS: 2206, Last Monday: 861, Year Ago: 2162.

GOAT RECEIPTS: 1356, Last Monday: 697, Year Ago: 2451.

Compared to last week, slaughter lambs sold mostly 10.00-20.00 lower. Demand for the lambs was moderate due to the large number of lambs offered. Slaughter ewes sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Demand was good for the good quality ewes offered. Slaughter supply consisted of 80 percent lambs, 12 percent slaughter ewes and 8 percent slaughter bucks. All sheep and lambs are destined for non-traditional markets. All sheep and lambs are sold by the hundred weight, on actual weights. Non-Traditional Markets:

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED/SHORN: CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 40-60 lbs 202.00-226.00, hair sheep 198.00-216.00, 60-80 lbs 189.00-212.00, hair sheep 190.00-222.00, 80-110 lbs 190.00-210.00, hair sheep 188.00-192.00, 110-130 lbs 190.00-200.00; CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 40-60 lbs 230.00-295.00, hair sheep 220.00-230.00, 60-80 lbs 214.00-232.00, 80-90 lbs 220.00-224.00; GOOD/CHOICE 1-3: 40-60 lbs hair sheep 174.00-200.00, 80-110 lbs 177.00-190.00, hair sheep 157.00-182.00, 110-120 lbs 174.00-188.00, hair sheep 165.00- 188.00, 130-150 lbs 176.00-194.00.; UTILITY/GOOD 1-2: 90-110 lbs 130.00-150.00, 120-140 lbs 132.00-137.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: Medium Flesh 80-100 lbs 98.00-112.00, 100-110 lbs 106.00-110.00, 110-120 lbs 106.00-122.00, hair sheep 118.00-122.00, 120-160 lbs 100.00-124.00, 160-230 lbs 95.00-110.00; UTILITY 1-2: Thin Flesh 110-120 lbs 86.00-104.00, hair sheep 100.00-110.00, 120-140 lbs 84.00-97.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS: 120-150 lbs hair sheep 105.00-127.00, 180-200 lbs 84.00-94.00, 200-250 lbs 86.00-96.00.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kids sold mostly steady to 20.00 higher compared to a very light test last week. Demand was moderate. Overall quality still not as good as previous weeks. Nannies traded mostly 10.00-20.00 lower. Reported slaughter supply consisted of 65 percent Slaughter Kids, 25 percent Slaughter Nannies, and 10 percent bucks/billies and whethers. All Goats are sold by the head on estimated weights.

SLAUGHTER KIDS (hd): SEL 1: 40-60 lbs 150.00-170.00, 60-80 lbs 156.00-182.00, 80-110 lbs 200.00-255.00; SEL 2: 40-60 lbs 112.00- 148.00, 60-80 lbs 132.00-175.00; SEL 3: 40-60 lbs 64.00-108.00, 60-80 lbs 127.00-132.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES (hd): SEL 1: 80-130 lbs 177.00-210.00, 130-160 lbs 207.00-235.00; SEL 2: 80-130 lbs 162.00-197.00; SEL 3: 70-80 lbs 95.00-115.00, 80-130 lbs 112.00-155.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES (hd): SEL 1: 110-150 lbs 230.00-275.00, 150-200 lbs 295.00-360.00; SEL 2: 120-150 lbs 210.00-225.00, 150-170 lbs 235.00-295.00; SEL 3: 110-150 lbs 180.00-220.00, 150-160 lbs 225.00.

SLAUGHTER WHETHERS (hd): SEL 1: 70-80 lbs 217.00-235.00, 80-100 lbs 265.00-270.00, 100-170 lbs 290.00-385.00; SEL 2: 50-100 lbs 142.00-177.00.

Source: USDA Dept. of Ag Market News, New Holland-Lancaster County, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Smoker Graded Goat & Sheep Auction
Parkesburg, Pa.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

SHEEP: 342; Last sale 536. GOATS: 369; Last sale 248.

When compared to the most recent sale two weeks ago, slaughter lambs sold 15.00-30.00 higher with very good demand. Ewes traded mostly 10.00 higher. Slaughter kid goats sold 10.00-15.00 higher; nannies 7.00-12.00 higher. Slaughter billies were lightly tested but sold with a firm undertone. Demand has been good for all sheep and goats with the end of Ramadan approaching and supplies being on the light side across the region. All goats are USDA graded and are co-mingled according to age, weight, sex, and selection grade. All sheep and goats are sold per cwt in their in-weights.

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED/SHORN: CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 12 head, 50-60 lbs 227.00-257.00; 9 head, 60-70 lbs 215.00-218.00; 10 head, 70-80 lbs 202.00; 12 head, 80-90 lbs 202.00-210.00; 5 head, 90-110 lbs 210.00; 33 head, 110-130 lbs 185.00. CHOICE 2-3: 17 head, 40-50 lbs 200.00-217.00; 18 head, 50-60 lbs 182.00-210.00; 64 head, 60-70 lbs 185.00-200.00; 38 head, 70-80 lbs 184.00-194.00; 6 head, 80-90 lbs 176.00-187.00; 72 head, 90-110 lbs 180.00-187.00; 2 head, 110-130 lbs 162.00. GOOD/CHOICE 1-2: 5 head, 40-50 lbs 150.00-190.00; 7 head, 50-60 lbs 170.00; 2 head, 90-110 lbs 157.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: 11 head, 90-120 lbs 80.00-94.00; 9 head, 120-160 lbs 70.00-82.00; 3 head, 160-200 lbs 70.00.

SLAUGHTER KIDS: SEL 1: 19 head, 40-60 lbs 245.00-260.00; 29 head, 60-80 lbs 240.00-242.00; 36 head, 80-100 lbs 202.00-254.00. SEL 2: 5 head, 20-40 lbs 237.00; 4 head, 20-40 lbs 200.00 Pygmies; 40 head, 40-60 lbs 232.00-250.00; 3 head, 40-60 lbs 200.00 Pygmies; 8 head, 60-80 lbs 220.00-235.00; 1 head, 80-100 lbs 162.00. SEL 3: 11 head, 20-40 lbs 150.00-152.00; 32 head, 40-60 lbs 225.00-230.00.

SLAUGHTER YEARLINGS: SEL 2: 2 head, 80-100 lbs 154.00; 2 head, 100-120 lbs 164.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES: SEL 1: 2 head, 80-130 lbs 136.00. SEL 2: 9 head, 50-80 lbs 125.00-140.00 Pygmies; 20 head, 80-130 lbs 148.00; 3 head, 80-130 lbs 110.00 Pygmies; 5 head, 130-180 lbs 102.00-136.00. SEL 3: 18 head, 50-80 lbs 144.00; 70 head, 80-130 lbs 130.00-132.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES: SEL 1: 4 head, 100-150 lbs 156.00-168.00; 5 head, 150-250 lbs 162.00. SEL 2: 7 head, 150-250 lbs 140.00-147.00 Pygmies; 2 head, 80-100 lbs 142.00 Pygmies. SEL 3: 6 head, 100-150 lbs 146.00-156.00.

SLAUGHTER WHETHERS: SEL 1: 3 head, 100-150 lbs 176.00; 2 head, 100-150 lbs 160.00 Pygmies. SEL 3: 7 head, 100-150 lbs 230.00-235.00.

Source: USDA Market News, New Holland-Lancaster County, PA. Levi Geyer 717-406-7350.

NOTE: The next graded goat sale will be Friday July 25.

New Holland Weekly Dairy Sale
New Holland, Pa.
July 16, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 270; Last Sale: 797; Last Year: 295.

Compared to last week, Dairy cows sold mostly 100.00-200.00 higher on good demand. Herd quality better than previous week. Bred heifers sold mostly steady. Demand was moderate. Trade was active. Wednesday’s supply included 95 fresh milking cows, 23 springing cows, 8 short bred cows, 25 springing heifers, 43 short bred heifers, 56 open heifers, and 3 bulls. One hundred percent of reported supply Holsteins unless otherwise noted. All sales sold on a per head basis.

FRESH COWS: Supreme: 2500.00-3100.00; Approved: 2000.00-2400.00; Medium: 1500.00-1950.00; Common: 1100.00-1375.00.

SHORT BRED COWS (1-3 months): Supreme: 2050.00 Individual; Approved: 1650.00-1800.00.

SPRINGING COWS (7-9 months): Approved: 2000.00-2200.00; Medium: 1800.00-1900.00; Common: 1300.00-1575.00.

CULL COWS: 925.00-1200.00 Few.

SPRINGING HEIFERS (7-9 months): Supreme: 2175.00-2350.00; Approved: 1800.00-2075.00; Medium: 1650.00-1750.00.

BRED HEIFERS (4-6 months): Supreme: 1825.00-1975.00; Approved: 1525.00-1775.00; Medium: 1350.00-1475.00.

SHORT BRED HEIFERS (1-3 months): Supreme: 1600.00-1775.00; Approved: 1450.00-1550.00; Medium: 1100.00-1225.00.

OPEN HEIFERS: SUPREME: 600-900 lbs 1000.00-1075.00; 900-1200 lbs 1200.00-1300.00; 1200-1500 lbs 1350.00-1435.00. APPROVED: 300-600 lbs 575.00-675.00; 600-900 lbs 900.00-950.00; 900-1200 lbs 1085.00-1150.00. MEDIUM: 300-600 lbs 475.00-500.00; 600-900 lbs 725.00-850.00.

BULLS: 300-600 lbs 700.00, 1200-1500 lbs 1350.00-1375.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

East Fluid Milk & Cream Review
Madison, Wis.
July 16, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Fluid cream and condensed skim prices in tanklot quantities: spot prices of class II cream, dollars per lb. Butterfat: F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast 3.3383-3.5529.

Prices of condensed skim, dollars per lb. solids, F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast - Class II - includes monthly formula prices 1.85-1.93. Northeast - Class III - spot prices 1.63-1.66.

Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of FLORIDA: THIS WK: In 0, Out 35; LAST WK: In 0, Out 48; LAST YR: In 0, Out 42. Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of other SOUTHEASTERN STATES: In 0, Out 0.

Milk production in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions is showing slight declines, although milk intakes for most processing plants are moderate. The Southeast’s milk production rates inched lower. Milk haulers schedules, in some instances, are changed from every day pickups due to the declines. The combined impact of marginal increases in bottling sales and lower milk production rates is lessening loads sent to manufacturing.

Florida’s farm-level production is hampered by hot, humid and wet weather, with daytime temperatures in the mid 90s and nights in the mid-70s. Pastures are not improving, with thunderstorms occurring daily and most of Florida experiencing 6 inches above normal rainfall for this time of year.

Class I demand is up a tick this week. Spot shipments out of the area totaled 35. Cream multiples for all Classes ranged 1.40-1.49. Last week, the CME Group Grade AA butter weekly average butter price was $2.3845, down $0.0505 from the previous week. Cream cheese production is active.

Condensed skim is plentiful, with the bulk of the volume going to Class IV production. Class II and III condensed skim demand is steady. Some loads moved out of region at discount, although high transportation costs cause manufacturers to consider options.

SOURCE: daniel.johnson@ams.usda.gov. 608-278-4156. USDA, AMS, Dairy Market News, Madison, Wis.

Dairy Product Price Highlights
Washington, D. C.
July 16, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

BUTTER prices received for 25 kilogram and 68 pound boxes meeting United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Grade AA standards averaged $2.31 per pound for the week ending July 12, 2014. The United States (US) price per pound increased 3.0 cents from the previous week.

CHEDDAR CHEESE prices received for US 40 pound blocks averaged $2.03 per pound for the week ending July 12, 2014. The price per pound decreased 0.9 cents from the previous week. The price for US 500 pound barrels adjusted to 38 percent moisture averaged $2.05 per pound, up 0.2 cents from the previous week.

DRY WHEY prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade standards averaged 68.8 cents per pound for the week ending July 12, 2014. The US price per pound decreased 0.7 cents from the previous week.

NONFAT DRY MILK prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade or United States Public Health Service (USPHS) Grade A standards averaged $1.88 per pound for the week ending July 12, 2014. The US price per pound increased 2.6 cents from the previous week.

Organic Dairy Market News
Madison, Wis.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied By USDA-AMS

Organic Dairy Fluid Overview

MILK PRODUCT SALES. AMS reports total organic milk products sales for April 2014, 205 million pounds, were up 7.4% from April last year and up 13.4% year to date compared with last year.

Organic whole milk sales for April 2014, 60 million pounds, were up 18.7% compared with April last year and up 21.5% year to date compared with last year.

Organic reduced fat milk sales for April, 62 million pounds, were 8.3% above sales one year earlier and up 19.4% year to date compared with last year.

ORGANIC DAIRY NEWS. Current organic milk supply tightness has varied impacts on the market for organic dairy dry products. A company located in South American seeking to import organic whole milk powder and organic skim milk powder for manufacturing has recently had difficulty in securing any export commitment from varied U.S. sources, whether manufacturers or traders. A large manufacturer told the prospective customer that there is not organic powder available to sell and the situation is unlikely to change until mid-next year at the soonest. This is a situation of supplies not being available, not a failure to agree on price.

A food manufacturer in New England which uses organic nonfat dry milk, now more often obtains it from New Zealand than U.S. sources. Several factors are cited. First, according to the manufacturer, pricing and supply have tended to be more stable when buying from New Zealand sources than U.S. sources.

Second, according to the manufacturer, little if any organic nonfat dry milk is manufactured in the eastern U.S., which leads to looking to manufacturers in the west. Freight costs for this manufacturer to ship organic NDM from California to the east by rail are higher than moving it from New Zealand by ship.

Another dimension to the tightness of organic NDM in the United States is the use by some domestic food manufacturers of imported organic E.U. certified dairy powders to supply protein. U.S. organic certified NDM is more expensive for the food manufacturer in the eastern U.S. than imported E.U certified organic dairy powder. This imported organic product is not certified as organic under U.S. standards but is used for food products manufactured in the U.S., then exported for sale outside the U.S.

Pricing currently quoted to U.S. customers for organic NDM ranges from $3.80 to $6.00.

Organic Dairy Retail Overview Nationally Advertised Price Comparison

ORGANIC DAIRY OVERVIEW. Organic dairy ad numbers have declined from the highest of the year two weeks ago, to slightly below average this two week period spanning the 4th of July. Organic yogurt ads are slightly above average but organic milk ads number slightly below average.

For the entire year 2014 until now, cumulative organic milk ad numbers lag the same period of 2013. Organic yogurt ads this year to date, lead the same period last year by about 50%. Overall organic dairy ad numbers for this year are slightly greater than last year to this point.

Advertising information presented is compiled from nearly 14,000 surveyed newspaper supermarket ads for the period June 30 to July 11, 2014, identifying weekly “specials” and containing organic dairy content. Surveyed ads reflect advertised “specials” and not the range of non-advertised supermarket cooler prices.

Complete results of this bi-weekly survey providing additional graphs, tables, and regional delineation, follow at the end of Dairy Market News, or can be accessed at: http://www.ams.usda.gov/ AMSv1.0/DairyRetailReport.

REGIONAL ORGANIC DAIRY AD TRENDS. Organic dairy ads appeared in all 6 regions. The percentage change in ad numbers increased from two weeks ago in the Northeast, 32%, but declined in the other regions: Midwest, -67%; Southeast, -92%; South Central, -59%; Southwest, -24%; and Northwest, -54%.

ORGANIC MILK HALF GALLONS. The U.S. weighted average advertised price of organic milk half gallons is $3.82, up 2 cents from 2 weeks ago. One year ago the national price was $3.54.

The lowest price is unchanged at $2.99, while the top of the price range is up 20 cents to $4.48. The lowest advertised price, $2.99, is advertised in the Southwest. The highest advertised price, $4.48, is found in the Northeast.

With the first half of 2014 now over, averaging the two week average prices of organic milk half gallons yields a cumulative six month national weighted average advertised price for organic milk half gallons of $3.47. The six month weighted average price for each region, and the region’s average percentage of total ads for organic milk half gallons are: Northeast, $4.16 (7%); Southwest, $3.55 (25%); Southeast, $3.44 (23%); Midwest, $3.40 (16%); South Central, $3.24 (19%); and Northwest, $3.22 (11%).

Half gallon containers of private label organic milk bottled in Colorado, in a plant receiving organic milk from herds in Colorado and Texas, were noted in Wisconsin and Illinois supermarkets this week.

ORGANIC — CONVENTIONAL MILK HALF GALLON PRICE SPREAD. The conventional-organic milk half gallon price spread is $.68. Last year at this time, the price spread was $1.17. The spread is calculated from the organic milk half-gallon price, $3.82, and the conventional milk half gallon average advertised price of $3.14. The price spread this year has ranged between $0.67 and $2.55.

ORGANIC 8 OUNCE MILK. Ad volume for organic 8 ounce milk is below average. The U.S. weighted average advertised price is $.84, down 20 cents from two weeks ago. One year ago the national price was $1.00. All ads were priced $.84.

ORGANIC YOGURT. Ads for 32 ounce organic yogurt lead the organic yogurt category in numbers. The national average price is $3.85, down 2 cents from two weeks ago up 66 cents from one year ago. The lowest priced ads are in the South Central region, $3.49, while the highest priced ads, $3.99, are in the Northwest.

The next greatest number of organic yogurt ads is for 4-6 ounce organic Greek yogurt, which has a national average price of $1.05, up 5 cents from 2 weeks ago and one year ago. Prices ranged from $1.00 in the Northeast and Southeast, to $1.25 in the Northeast.

ORGANIC 48-64 OUNCE ICE CREAM. All ads for 48-64 ounce organic ice cream ran in the Southwest, all priced $5.99. There were no ads two weeks ago. One year ago, when over 8 times as many ads for 48-64 ounce organic ice cream ran, the average price was $3.81.

Supermarket Price Comparison

MADISON, WISCONSIN PRICES. Non-advertised organic milk, yogurt, butter and cheese prices in a range of food stores in Madison, Wisconsin are compared for this two week period. Stores included a big-box sized local supermarket; 2 regional chain supermarkets; a smaller but full product line food market; and 2 natural food stores; a national discount big box chain store also selling food; and a large local cooperative grocery store. Organic milk available included 2 national brands, 4 private label store brands, and 3 small local or nearby creamery brands, one featuring non-homogenized milk. Cheese available included 2 national brands, 2 store brands, and cheese from 5 other cheese makers.

SOURCE: www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/dybdairyorganic.pdf.

U.S. Turkeys
Washington, D.C.
July 15, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Eggs in Incubators Up 2%

Turkey eggs in incubators on July 1, 2014, in the United States totaled 28.4 million, up 2 percent from July 1, 2013. Eggs in incubators were down 2 percent from the June 1, 2014 total of 28.9 million eggs.

Poults Hatched Up 10%

Turkey poults hatched during June 2014, in the United States totaled 23.5 million, up 10 percent from June 2013. Poults hatched were down 3 percent from the May 2014 total of 24.2 million poults.

Net Poults Placed Up 9%

The 23.2 million net poults placed during June 2014 in the United States were up 9 percent from the number placed during the same month a year earlier. Net placements were down slightly from the May 2014 total of 23.3 million.

Released July 15, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Average Farm Feed Costs for Handy Reference
Ephrata, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

To provide farmers across the state with a handy reference of commodity input costs in their feeding operations for DHIA record sheets or to develop livestock feed cost data, here are last week’s average costs of various ingredients as compiled from regional reports across the state of Pennsylvania.

Remember, these are averages, so you will need to adjust your figures up or down according to your location and the quality of your crop.

CORN, No. 2: 4.20 bu, 7.51 cwt.

WHEAT, No. 2: 5.27 bu, 8.80 cwt.

BARLEY, No. 3: 2.51 bu, 5.36 cwt.

OATS, No. 2: 3.59 bu, 11.20 cwt.

SOYBEANS, No. 2: 13.22 bu, 22.07 cwt.

EAR CORN: 111.67 bu, 5.58 cwt.

ALFALFA HAY: 223.75 ton, 11.19 cwt.

MIXED HAY: 215.00 ton, 10.75 cwt.

TIMOTHY HAY: 213.75 ton, 10.69 cwt.

GRASS HAY: 175.00 ton, 8.75cwt.

PA Regional Hay
Lewisburg, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and per ton.

Summary of Lancaster Area Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 98 loads. Straw: 6 loads. ALFALFA: 170.00-245.00. MIXED: 70.00-480.00. TIMOTHY: 145.00-350.00. GRASS: 115.00-295.00. STRAW: 135.00-180.00.

Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 28 loads; Straw: 3 loads. ALFALFA: 240.00. MIXED: 40.00-270.00. TIMOTHY: 165.00-195.00. GRASS: 80.00-210.00. STRAW: 120.00-170.00.

Source: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

PA Grain Report
New Holland, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

Compared to last week’s opening bids; grain and bean prices were mostly lower to start the week. Basis firmed in spots, but overall the market has maintained a bearish undertone. Friday’s USDA World Agriculture Supply and Demand Report indicated plentiful supplies of corn and soybeans both domestically and across the globe. Weather continues to be ideal for crop development as corn enters into its pollination phase and beans begin to bloom. Cooler temperatures are in the forecast for the remainder of the week and rainfall has been more than adequate for the majority of the major grain production areas. USDA’s average farm price estimates was lowered for soybeans in Friday’s report to a range of 9.50-11.50/bu. Corn price estimates remained the same from 3.85-4.55/bu. Ending stocks were raised in both categories with beans jumping from 323 million bushels to 415 million bushels, a 11.7% stock to use ratio. Corn was increased from 1.726 billion bushels to 1.801 billion bushels with a stock to use ratio of 13.5%. The increases were in response to increased acreage planted for beans and less feed and residual use in corn. All grain and soybean prices are quoted per bushel delivered to the mill or elevator. Bases reflect last Friday’s CME close against Monday morning’s spot cash bids.

US No 2 Yellow Corn: EASTERN: 3.8500-4.4700, dn 29-dn 8, -15n to 47n, dn 12-up 9; CENTRAL: 3.9000-4.6900, dn 25-unch, -10n to 69n, dn 8-up 17; WESTERN: 3.8000-4.4500, dn 5-unch, -20n to 45n, up 12-up 17.

US No 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat: EASTERN: 5.0000-5.5100, dn 49-dn 27, -15n to 36n, up 4-up 26.

US No 3 Feed Barley: EASTERN: 2.4000-2.6000, dn 10-dn 30; CENTRAL: 2.4000-2.6000, up 15-unch.

US No 2 White Oats: CENTRAL: 3.2000-3.7500, unch, -29n to 26n, up 42; WESTERN: 3.5000-4.2000, no comp, 1n to 71n, no comp.

US No 2 Soybeans: EASTERN: 12.9600-13.6100, dn 16-dn 49, optn to 65n, up 76-up 43; CENTRAL: 12.9500-13.5500, dn 55-dn 58, -1n to 59n, up 37-up 34.

Average Bid Price: EASTERN: Corn 4.15, Wheat 5.27, Barley 2.50, Soybeans 13.26; CENTRAL: Corn 4.41 Barley 2.51, Oats 3.38, Soybeans 13.17; WESTERN: Corn 4.03, Oats 3.80.

Eastern — Contracts: CORN: 3.8200-4.3400, dn 25-unch, -3z to 49z, up 5-up 30; SOYBEANS: 10.1900-10.9200, dn 42-dn 2, -56x to 17x, up 16.5-up 56.5.

Chicago Board of Trade month symbols: F January, G February, H March, J April, K May, M June, N July, Q August, U September, V October, X November, Z December.

Source: USDA Market News Service, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer Office 717-354-2391.

KEY: Region: Bid price, change in price compared to last week, basis, change in basis.

Northeast Acreage
Harrisburg, Pa.
July 8, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS-Pa.

Field Crop Acreage: The June Survey has revealed that farmers in the Northeast Region planned to harvest more acres of soybeans, oats and winter wheat this season than in 2013. The crop acreage for corn, hay, and barley was lower than forecasted for this year, and also lower than 2013. The largest acreage decreases are in corn, with an expected loss of nearly 800 thousand acres across the region. The largest percentage increases is expected to be in soybean acreage, with an anticipated increase of more than 200 thousand acres from last year, according to the Northeastern Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service.

Northeast Grain Update
Harrisburg, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report supplied by USDA/NASS-Pa.

The USDA-NASS, Northeast Region has released the crop production forecast for July. The latest survey, which was conducted during the last week of June and the first week of July, included the following commodities.

BARLEY Maryland’s 2014 barley harvest is forecasted to be 45 thousand acres, down 13 percent from last year. Farmers reported an average yield of 72 bushels per acre, down 13 bushels from last year’s yield and a final expected production of 3.2 million bushels. In 2013, the area harvest forecast was 52 acres with an average yield of 85 bushels and a final production of 4.4 million bushels.

Pennsylvania’s 2014 barley harvest is projected to be 55 thousand acres, with a yield of 68 bushels per acre, which is unchanged from 2013, and final production statewide is forecasted at 3.7 million bushels of barley, which is an 8 percent drop from the previous year. In 2013, 60 thousand acres were harvested, with a yield of 68 bushels per acre and a final production of 4.1 million bushels statewide.

OATS New York farmers reported an expected harvest of 40 thousand acres of oats, a yield of 75 bushels per acre, and a final production of 3 million bushels. In 2013, the area harvested was 46 thousand acres, 67 bushels were yielded per acre, and the final production was 3.1 million bushels.

Pennsylvania farmers reported an expected 2014 harvest of 60 thousand acres of oats, a yield of 55 bushels per acre, and a final production of 3.3 million bushels. 2014 production shows a 6 percent increase from 2013, when operators harvested 50 thousand acres, yielded 62 bushels per acre, and produced 3.1 million bushels in total.

WINTER WHEAT Maryland winter wheat harvest for 2014 is expected to be 255 thousand acres, with a yield of 65 bushels per acre, and a final production expected to be 16.6 million bushels. Cultivation was down from the previous year, as harvest in 2013 was 260 thousand acres, with a yield of 67 bushels per acre, and a final production of 17.4 million bushels.

New York’s harvest has been calculated at 95 thousand acres, a 17 percent decrease from last year. Farmers expect to yield 66 bushels per acre, with a final production value of 6.3 million bushels in 2014. In 2013, 115 thousand acres of wheat were harvested, with a slightly higher yield per acre of 68 bushels, and a final production of 7.8 million bushels for New York.

Pennsylvania’s 2014 Winter Wheat harvest area is anticipated to be 165 thousand acres, with a yield of 63 bushels per acre, and a final foreseen production rate of 10.4 million bushels. Reported for 2013 was a harvest of 160 thousand acres, a yield of 68 bushels per acre, and final production rate of 10.9 million bushels.

The next production forecast will be issued August 12, 2014. For the complete Crop Production report, see: http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do?documentID=1046

PA Tillage Practices
Harrisburg, Pa.
July 1, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS-Pa.

USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Pennsylvania Field Office, has completed its 2014 survey of tillage practices for major field crops in the Commonwealth. The survey is funded by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and conducted in conjunction with NASS’s annual June Agricultural Survey.

In 2014, conventional tillage was used on 15.6 % of the major crop acreage in Pennsylvania, down slightly from the 16 % recorded in 2013. No-till was practiced on 66.8 % of the major crop acreage, and other conservation tillage practices were used on the remaining 17.6 %. Corn and soybeans are the two crops with the highest acreages. Conventional till was used on 17.0% of the corn acreage, no-till was practiced on 65.9% of the acreage, and the remaining 17.1% of the corn acreage used other conservation tillage practices. In soybeans, conventional till was used on 10.0% of the acreage, no-till was practiced on 73.0% of the acreage, and the remaining 17.1% of the acreage was cultivated using other conservation tillage practices.

U.S. Crop Production
Washington, D.C.
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Winter Wheat Production Down 1%

Winter wheat production is forecast at 1.37 billion bushels, down 1 percent from the June 1 forecast and down 11 percent from 2013. Based on July 1 conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 42.2 bushels per acre, down 0.2 bushel from last month and down 5.2 bushels from last year. The area expected to be harvested for grain or seed totals 32.4 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30, 2014 but up slightly from last year.

Hard Red Winter production, at 703 million bushels, is down 2 percent from last month. Soft Red Winter, at 458 million bushels, is up 1 percent from the June forecast. White Winter, at 206 million bushels, is up slightly from last month. Of the White Winter production, 10.6 million bushels are Hard White and 196 million bushels are Soft White.

Durum wheat production is forecast at 59.6 million bushels, down 4 percent from 2013. The United States yield is forecast at 42.1 bushels per acre, down 1.5 bushels from last year. Expected area to be harvested for grain totals 1.42 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30, 2014 but down slightly from last year.

Other spring wheat production is forecast at 565 million bushels, up 6 percent from last year. Area harvested for grain is expected to total 12.4 million acres, unchanged from the Acreage report released on June 30, 2014 but up 9 percent from last year. The United States yield is forecast at 45.5 bushels per acre, down 1.6 bushels from 2013. Of the total production, 520 million bushels are Hard Red Spring wheat, up 6 percent from last year.

Orange Production Down Slightly

The United States all orange forecast for the 2013-2014 season is 6.94 million tons, down slightly from the previous forecast and down 16 percent from the 2012-2013 final utilization. The Florida all orange forecast, at 104 million boxes (4.70 million tons), is up slightly from the previous forecast but down 22 percent from last season’s final utilization. Early, midseason, and Navel varieties in Florida are forecast at 53.3 million boxes (2.40 million tons), unchanged from the previous forecast but down 21 percent from last season. The Florida Valencia orange forecast, at 51.1 million boxes (2.30 million tons), is up slightly from the previous forecast but down 23 percent from last season’s final utilization.

Florida frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) yield forecast for the 2013-2014 season is 1.57 gallons per box at 42.0 degrees Brix, unchanged from the June forecast but down 1 percent from last season’s final yield of 1.59 gallons per box. The early-midseason portion is projected at 1.52 gallons per box, up 1 percent from last season’s yield of 1.51 gallons per box. The Valencia portion is projected at 1.64 gallons per box, down 3 percent from last year’s final yield. All projections of yield assume the processing relationships this season will be similar to those of the past several seasons.

Released July 11, 2014, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Northeast Floriculture Annual Report
Harrisburg, Pa.
July 14, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA-NASS-Pa.

There were 1,810 growers in the Northeast in 2013, compared to 2,030 growers in 2012. The 2013 wholesale value of sales by commercial flower and foliage producers in the region was $653.5 million. There was a slight increase in 2013, with 2012 total wholesale value of sales reaching more than $648.7 million.

The value of sales at wholesale of total bedding or garden plants for operations with over $100,000 in sales in 2013 was $399.8 million, and for 2012 sales were $385.4 million.

The total covered growing area for operations with more than $100,000 in sales in the Northeast region in 2013 was 61.3 million square feet.

Covered growing area included: glass greenhouses, 11.3 million square feet in 2013 and 11.5 million for 2012; fiberglass and other rigid greenhouses, 3.9 million square feet in 2013 and 3.8 million in 2012; film plastic (single/multi) greenhouses, 45 million square feet in 2013 and 45.9 million in 2012; and shade and temporary cover, 1.1 million for 2013 and 2012. Growers also used 2,927 acres of open ground in 2013 as well as 2,651 in 2012.

Monthly Bison Carcass Report
Des Moines, Iowa
July 11, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA

ACTUAL SLAUGHTER NUMBERS IN FEDERALLY INSPECTED PLANTS (not necessarily inspected) BISON: Week Ending 6/07/14: 1058; Week Ending 6/14/14: 1018; Week Ending 6/21/14: 1018; Week Ending 6/28/14: 1229; Total: 4,323.

CANADIAN LIVE BISON IMPORTS INTO U.S. FOR JUNE: Slaughter Male: 761; Slaughter Female: 724; Feeder Male: 166; Feeder Female: 154; Total: 1805.

BISON CARCASSES: Compared to May’s report: Prices for bison carcasses were all higher, regardless of age or gender. This upswing in prices reflects a season increase in deamnd as tourist season started in the western states and national parks.

BISON MEAT: Compared to May’s report: Fresh bison meat prices crept higher while prices for frozen bison fell slightly as warm weather and the grilling season began. Prices for ground bison as well as patties also crept higher in moves that reflect a season demand.

Source: USDA Market News Service, Des Moines, IA. Nina Biensen, 515-284-4460.

Honey Monthly Update
Washington, D.C.
July 15, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Colony, Honey Plant And Market Conditions During June 2014

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD, PA, VA, WV): Colonies continue to progress as the hot, humid weather of summer has arrived. Scattered showers have helped keep up moisture levels consistent in the mountain areas; however, the water tables in the flat lands to the east and south are drier than normal and in need of rain. Honey production has been good. The bloom in June was good and as the bramble, laurel and rhododendron blooms fade, the sourwood, ash, elder, clover and butterfly weed have become the current major sources of nectar.

KENTUCKY: For central Kentucky the effects of the past winter varied greatly. In some locations the honey flow has been very strong, while other locations nearby have had weak honey flows. Apparently, the long term effects of the winter on honey plants have been quite variable.

NEW ENGLAND: New England weather for the month of June generally ranged from cool to mild with a few very hot and humid days and plenty of rainfall for ideal soil moisture conditions. Topsoil moisture levels have been perfectly suited to foster a full and complete ornamental and floral bloom. After a long winter, it has taken many Northeast beekeepers time to rebuild their bee populations. June has been an excellent month for bee growth in many areas especially with rapid colony growth and honey production. Early seasonal nectar and pollen sources were black locust, autumn olive, staghorn and especially smooth/shiny sumac and white clover. Many floral, pollen and nectar sources were blooming profusely such as choke and pin cherry, Mt. laurel profuse, grass clovers, honeysuckle, wildflowers, herbs, knapweed, loosestrife, catalpa, buckwheat as well as linden (basswood), tulip popular, sumac, black locust and blooming fruit trees and vegetable crop plantings. In some regional areas a lot of rain kept some plants blooming for some time including dandelions, clovers, and alfalfa. The very cool weather and some storms at the peak of the black locust bloom reduced some yields such that an average to slightly below crop is expected for this past spring was the result. Reportedly providing excellent bloom was berry crops especially strawberries. Vegetable crops showing good bloom were cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, squash and pumpkins. Pollination of apple and peaches had good weather in western Massachusetts and extraordinary pollination results for blueberries.

This is the time of year that Supercedure and swarm cells can be starting to materialize. Seasoned beekeepers are monitoring their colonies often, adding supers or making splits and divides when hives become too crowded especially using the technique of making new colonies with capped brood frames with swarm colonies. Swarming has been catching some beekeepers off guard and many did not start swarm prevention early enough to discourage primary swarms. In regional pocket areas where weather was clearly seasonal, colony strength numbers increased dramatically and swarms were numerous. A swarm leaves the hive with no new brood to boost the population for at least 3 weeks. The hive needs an abundance of forging bees to bring in a honey crop. Swarming is one of the major reasons for the lack of honey. Most beekeepers report that most of their parent hives that experienced swarming, have re-queened with no issues.

Clearly in many other regional areas, colony strength did not get up to speed as early as usual due to inclement weather and the cooler nights. Seasoned beekeepers advise to keep sugar feedings going in order to strengthen nectar buildup and to also add two supers at a time instead of a single. Many keepers have expressed their delight in the early extraction of extremely lightly colored honey from black locust trees. The amber colored seems to be sourced from dandelion, Dutch clover and yellow and white sweet clover. Reportedly, regarding this spring, the honey yield seemed to be good in some places and not in others but this current flow is not over yet. Purportly, bees have been very calm with very little aggression this year as compared to previous years. They seem less aggressive and busier attending to business. Noticeably different this year is the overabundance of burr comb and propolis.

Mite populations are noticeably low and less than expected, which is probably the result of slower brood growth hence limiting mite reproduction. Reportedly so far there have been very few pest problems with very few hive beetle issues. Carpenter ants have been more prevalent than usual especially if sugar feedings are being done. Keepers advise using cinnamon and borax powder around the perimeter of their hives to help alleviate ant problems. No American foul brood or pronounced tracheal mites infestations have been reported. Additionally, the varroa mite and hive beetle counts have not been high enough to seriously hurt hives. Keepers this month continue to check for diseases and at this time and if found will utilize Fumidil-B, Terramycin, apiguard and formic acid. Additionally, Hivastan, - that is comparable to Apistan (fluvalinate), has been added to the fight against mite diseases. Secondly, resourceful beekeepers are implementing the drone brood frame program which seriously interrupts the mite breeding cycle. This month there have been many Queen problems reported, particularly early Supercedure of Queens. Although the specific cause is not known, many keepers believe Nosema and other diseases have been impacting the queen’s health. Additionally, one major problem seems to be queens in packages from the south, have not done well.

Domestic honey is in short supply and much lower than normal until the new crop is harvested. June is a major honey producing month for the Northeast and keepers are hoping that the rest of the summer will give way to sunny weather hence, giving bees a chance to catch up. Prices are higher than ever and demand for local honey continues strong and steady. Prices quoted for retail 1 lb. bottled units were $8.50 to $10.50 mostly $10.00, occasionally higher, and 1 Quart bottled units were $18.00 to $20.00 mostly $19.50, occasionally higher, inclusive of all varieties; for food service operations, prices were firm with 5 gallon units at $195.00 to $240.00 mostly $230.00 and occasionally lower for all raw and natural honey depending on variety and quality. In the Northeast overall, the wholesale natural and raw honey price has been around $2.50 to $2.80 per pound, mostly 2.75 per pound, by the 55 gallon barrel.

NEW YORK: The cooler late spring and early June slowed colony growth; thus only a small surplus of honey has been harvested in the Finger Lakes region. Beekeepers have reported seeing the appearance of chalkbrood due to the cool, wet weather and slower colony grower. Swarms have been few this season and later than usual. Black Locust flowered heavily and beekeepers were looking at a good crop until heavy rains and localized hail storms followed by cooler temperatures prematurely ended the promise of a heavy laden bloom period. Basswood and sumac holds promise over the next few weeks as trees are heavily flowering. However, a period of warmth and sunshine would be welcome to extend the flows. In the southern Adirondack region, Black locust and sumac bloom has provided good forage sources for bees, and the upcoming basswood bloom appears to be strong. Demand for very light supplies of honey is strong. One beekeeper purchased wholesale bulk honey at $2.70 pound. Some beekeepers in the Catskills reported heavy losses over the winter, or bees that were weakened by the extended cold period. Even now, the hives seems to be weeks behind in development. The black locust bloom seemed to sporadic: good in some locations and practically nil in others. Basswood and milk weed are just about to bloom. Local market honey is selling for around $8.00 pound with tight supplies.

NORTH CAROLINA: Temperatures in North Carolina were mostly above normal throughout June. Precipitation was mostly normal. Statewide soil moisture levels averaged 3 percent very short, 25.5 percent short, 64.5 percent adequate, and 7 percent surplus the week ending June 21. The North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council reported 13 counties as being abnormally dry. Hives appeared to be healthy and, according to apiary inspectors, pest levels have been low. The spring honey crop was average to above average compared to recent years. Bees could be seen working Sumac and Sourwood across the State. Dandelion; Raspberry; Tulip Poplar; and Basswood, Linden were available in the Mountain region. Persimmon and Clovers (Ladino, White and Sweet) were available throughout the Mountain and Piedmont regions. Also, available in the Piedmont region were Aslike Clover and Vetch; while Gallberry was blooming in the Coastal Plains region. The wildflower and Tulip Poplar honey harvests in central North Carolina were reportedly plentiful and the Sourwood crop has started out favorably. Demand for honey remains high and prices are expected to remain at a premium, especially at the retail level. Commercial pollinator hives spent the month in North Carolina fields pollinating summer vegetables and melons.

OHIO: Showers in June were beneficial to good honey flows. Early in the month, locust provided a good forage source, while white Dutch and sweet clovers provided extended flows due to showers during the latter half of the month. Catalpa bloom was shortened due to heavy rains near the end of the month. Beekeepers are optimistic that the heavy spring flows will provide good honey stores for the hives as well as replenish honey stocks around the state. The colonies have built up faster than varroa mites at this time. Milk weed bloom is just around the corner.

SOURCE: www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/fvmhoney.pdf.

Apple Processing Report
Fresno, Calif.
July 10, 2014
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Utilized for Processing in 1 ton Units in Appalachian District

JUICE APPLES: Week ending 6/14: 732; Week ending 6/21: 1069; Week ending 6/28: 495; 2013 to date: 50876; 2012 to date: 54988; Final 2012: 56428.

CANNER APPLES: Week ending 6/14: 3758; Week ending 6/21: 2994; Week ending 6/28: 2054; 2013 to date: 216734; 2012 to date: 195237; Final 2012: 207550.

TOTAL APPLES: Week ending 6/14: 4490; Week ending 6/21: 4063; Week ending 6/28: 2549; 2013 to date: 267610; 2012 to date: 250225; Final 2012: 263978.

Trading

APPLE JUICE CONCENTRATE IMPORTS PORTS OF ENTRY EAST COAST: Prices for apple juice concentrate for the period July 3 -9, 2014. Acidity 1.0-2.2 percent weight/weight as malic acid, color 40-70 percent, brix minimum of 70.0, various containers (drums, bins, or bulk liquid packaging). Sales Ex Doc, excludes freight charges, all duties paid, containers included unless otherwise stated. Prices offered to importers per gallon basis in U.S. Dollars. China Offerings insufficient to quote.

Shipping Point Trends

CHILE: Imports 200-206-211 — Imports via boat. Movement expected to decrease. PORT OF ENTRY: PHILADELPHIA AREA. Trading moderate. Prices unchanged. Cartons 12 3-pound film bags Fuji 24.00-26.00; Granny Smith 18.00-20.00; Royal Gala 22.00-24.00. 18 kilogram cartons tray pack Fuji 70-90s 36.00-38.00, 100s 32.00-34.00; Granny Smith 70-90s 28.00-30.00, 100s 26.00-28.00; Royal Gala 70-80s 34.00-36.00, 90s 32.00-34.00, 100s 30.00-32.00, 110s 28.00-30.00; Braeburn 70-90s 30.00-32.00, 100s 28.00-30.00; Pink Lady/Cripps Pink 70-80s 34.00-36.00, 90s 32.00-34.00, 100s 30.00-32.00. Quality good.

NEW YORK: Shipments 41-36-23 — Movement expected to decrease seasonally. Trading moderate. Prices generally unchanged. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-pound film bags 2 1/2 inch minimum Empire mostly 16.00-18.00, Red Delicious mostly 18.00-20.00.

MICHIGAN: Shipments 38-29-22 — Movement expected to continue seasonal decline. Trading moderate. Prices unchanged. Cartons U.S. Extra Fancy 12 3-lb film bags 2-1/2 inch minimum Red and Golden Delicious mostly 18.00, tray pack 88s Red Delicious mostly 20.00. Supplies light.

NOTE: For a complete national report, visit marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv, or call 559-487-5178.


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10/25/2014 | Last Updated: 4:15 PM