Market Reports for June 22, 2013

6/22/2013 7:00 AM

Market at a Glance
Lancaster County Livestock Auction Averages
Prices Per Hundredweight
June 21, 2013
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

STEERS, CHOICE 2-3: This week 121.40; Last week 123.00; Last year 116.15.

HOLSTEIN STEERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 109.00; Last week 107.60; Last year 104.45.

HEIFERS, CHOICE/PRIME: This week 119.40; Last week 116.45; Last year 113.00.

COWS, BREAKERS, 75-80% LEAN: This week 79.90; Last week 78.40; Last year 85.10.

COWS, BONERS, 80-85% LEAN: This week 78.25; Last week 76.90; Last year 82.75.

BULLS, YG 1: This week 95.10; Last week 93.30; Last year 103.15.

HOGS, 49-54% LEAN, MONDAY: This week 65.00; Last week 61.50; Last year 75.00.

LAMBS, CHOICE/PRIME 80-110 LB: This week 159.00; Last week 150.50; Last year 182.00.

BULL CALVES, #1: This week 130.50; Last week 121.25.

KID GOATS, SELECTION 1 (head): This week 160.00; Last week 178.75.

PA Weekly Livestock Trends
New Holland, Pa.
June 14, 2013
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Combined Livestock Receipts from New Holland, Vintage, Dewart, Middleburg, Greencastle, Lebanon Valley and Waynesburg.

CATTLE: This week 3321; Last week 3140; Last year 4175. CALVES: This week 2381; Last week 2475; Last year 3267. HOGS: This week 1063; Last week 1189; Last year 1289. FEEDER PIGS: This week n/a; Last week n/a; Last year 513. LAMBS/SHEEP: This week 1659; Last week 3592; Last year 1495.

GOATS: This week 1772; Last week 1612; Last year 1945.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Compared to last week`s market, slaughter steers sold mostly 3.00 to 5.00 lower. Slaughter holsteins and slaughter heifers sold mostly 3.00 to 5.00 lower. Slaughter cows sold mostly 3.00 to 5.00 lower and slaughter bulls sold mostly 3.00 to 5.00 lower.

FEEDER CATTLE: Compared to last week’s market, slaughter steers sold mostly 5.00 to 10.00 lower. Slaughter heifers sold mostly 5.00 to 10.00 lower and slaughter bulls sold mostly 5.00 to 10.00 lower.

HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last week, holstein bull calves sold mostly 5.00 to 10.00 lower and holstein heifers sold mostly 5.00 to 15.00 lower.

HOGS: Compared to last week’s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 2.00 to 3.00 lower. Sows sold mostly steady.

SLAUGHTER SHEEP: When compared to last week, slaughter lambs sold mostly 20.00 to 40.00 higher. Slaughter ewes sold firm.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kids sold mostly 10.00 to 20.00 lower. Slaughter nanny goats sold mostly 10.00-20.00 higher. Slaughter billies sold steady.

SOURCE: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

Lancaster County Weekly Cattle
New Holland, Pa. 
June 21, 2013 
Report Supplied By USDA


CATTLE: 2545, Last week 3041, Last year 2472. CALVES: 1579, Last week 1399, Last year 1659. 

This week in Lancaster County, slaughter steers sold steady to mostly 1.00 lower. Demand was light to moderate with a heavy supply being offered towards the end of the week. Very light supplies early in the week were rationed by nominally higher prices. 
The cow market continues to hold firm with good demand as the 4th of July Holiday approaches. The box beef market has seem to find some bottom end support near 199.00/cwt after a choppy week of trade before closing at 199.36/cwt on Thursday. The Choice/Select Spread has narrowed to 13.48/cwt, a typically summer pattern as consumers lose interest in middle meats as the summer progresses, but this year the trend began a little earlier due to wet weather putting a damper on the spring grilling season. 

In the direct markets across the Midwest, a light volume of steers were traded in Nebraska as of Thursday at 121.50/cwt Live. Packers are not showing much interest in buying cattle with a wide gap between offers and asking prices. Beef processor margins remain well in the positive and beef packs see no need in rising prices with the dog days of summer coming on and plenty of cattle lined up for the 3rd quarter of the year. 

Cattle feeders have little negotiation power and those that are not hedge are compliant with taking anything over the futures price towards the end of the week. 

Another week of inefficient gains is not worth the cost of high priced feed, particularly with little hope for higher prices in the near-term. USDA will release its cattle on feed report this Friday. Pre-report estimates expect to see a continued trend of lower COF from a year ago, but there is a big discrepancy in June 1st placements. A Dow Jones poll show estimates ranging from 16% lower to nearly even with last year's placements. The final say will most likely have an effect on fall contracts for feeder cattle futures as well as October and December Live Cattle futures which already have some premium priced in anticipating fewer finished cattle towards the last quarter of the year. 

Corn planting has drawn to a close this past week. Good soil moisture and temperate weather has allowed for a great start for the growing season and if weather holds up without any adverse changes the crop should produce a substantial harvest going into the fall, and hopefully ease feed cost while increasing profit potential for cattle going on feed. 

All cattle markets are priced per cwt. 

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1250-1625 lbs 122.00-126.00; CHOICE 2-3: 1300-1600 lbs 119.00-123.50; SELECT 1-3: 1250-1650 lbs 115.00- 119.50. 

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1450-1625 lbs 109.00-112.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1550-1650 lbs 105.00-108.00; SELECT 1-3: 1400-1650 lbs 101.50-104.50. 

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1150-1300 lbs 122.50-125.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1100-1300 lbs 115.50-119.00; SELECT 1-3: 1050-1400 lbs 102.00-110.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 79.00-86.00, High dress 90.00-96.00, Low dress 75.00-78.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 77.00-83.00, High dress 84.50-91.00, Low dress 74.00-77.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 76.00-81.00, High dress 82.00-84.00, Low dress 68.00-76.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 72.00-78.50, High dress 78.50-82.00, Low dress 65.00-72.00. 

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 920-1685 lbs 93.00-103.00, high dress 103.00-107.50, low dress 87.00-93.00. 

CALF SUMMARY: This week in Lancaster County, Holstein Bull calves sold 10.00 higher early in the week before trending 10.00-20.00 lower by the end week. Heifers traded mostly steady with light demand. The Composite Veal Carcass Values for the Northeast United States was quoted from 330.00-354.00/cwt this week, with a weighted average value of 334.83/cwt (Hide-off). All prices per cwt. 

MONDAY: HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 95-120 lbs 130.00-152.00, 90 lbs 100.00-130.00; #2: 95-120 lbs 100.00-125.00, 80-90 lbs 75.00-90.00; #3: 95-120 lbs 60.00-90.00, 75-90 lbs 50.00-70.00; UTILITY: 70-90 lbs 32.00-55.00. 

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 95.00-120.00; #2: 75-115 lbs 60.00-85.00; UTILITY/NON-TUBING: 75-90 lbs 52.00-60.00. 

TUESDAY: GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 140.00-160.00; #2: 80-113 lbs 125.00-140.00; #3: 75-110 lbs 70.00-90.00; UTILITY: 70-105 lbs 50.00-55.00, 73 lbs 25.00. 

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 93-115 lbs 100.00-120.00; #2: 84-93 lbs 70.00-90.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 65-93 lbs 20.00-40.00.

THURSDAY: GRADED BULL CALVES: #1: 94-128 lbs 121.00-141.00, 90-92 lbs 90.00; #2: 98-128 lbs 115.00-120.00, 88-94 lbs 82.00-87.00, 80-86 lbs 65.00; #3: 72-130 lbs 44.00-62.00; UTILITY: 60-110 lbs 30.00-35.00. 

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 85-100 lbs 90.00-115.00; #2: 75-110 lbs 50.00-80.00; JERSEY/CROSSBRED: 60-100 lbs 70.00-100.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 55-85 lbs 15.00-30.00. 

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391. 

New Holland Monday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 723, Last week 811, Last year 636. CALVES: 338, Last week 374, Last year 342.

When compared to last week’s sale, slaughter cows sold 2.00-3.00 higher with very good demand. Bulls traded 3.00-5.00 higher. Slaughter supply included 152 slaughter steers, 106 heifers, 247 cows, 174 bulls, and 39 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 81.00-86.00, High dress 90.00-96.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 77.00-83.00, High dress 85.00-91.00, Low dress 74.00-76.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 76.00-79.00, High dress 82.00-84.00, Low dress 68.00-74.00; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 72.00-76.50, High dress 77.00-81.00, Low dress 67.00-70.00.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 920-1685 lbs 96.00-103.00, high dress 103.00-106.00, low dress 87.00-94.00.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: Compared to last Monday’s sale, bull calves sold mostly 5.00-10.00 with moderate demand. Heifers traded steady with light demand. All prices per cwt, all calves are Holstein unless otherwise noted.

HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 95-120 lbs 130.00-152.00, 90 lbs 100.00-130.00; #2: 95-120 lbs 100.00-125.00, 80-90 lbs 75.00-90.00; #3: 95-120 lbs 60.00-90.00, 75-90 lbs 50.00-70.00; UTILITY: 70-90 lbs 32.00-55.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 95.00-120.00; #2: 75-115 lbs 60.00-85.00; UTILITY/NON-TUBING: 75-90 lbs 52.00-60.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Vintage Special Feeder Cattle Sale
Paradise, Pa.
June 14, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 253; Last Sale: 484.

A smaller run of cattle for Friday`s special feeder sale found very interested buyers. Several attractive lots of cattle offered. Buyer turnout was good. Trade was active. Market trends were mostly higher than last months sale. Demand was good overall. All prices per cwt.

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 400-500 lbs 160.00-170.00, 500-600 lbs 160.00-170.00 Few Fancy 175.00-180.00, 600-700 lbs 150.00-160.00 Few Fancy 168.00, 700-900 lbs 136.00-150.00, 1000-1200 lbs 112.00-121.00 Fancy Set 1000 lbs 142.00; MED/LGE 2: 400-500 lbs 147.00-155.00, 500-600 lbs 140.00-155.00, 600-800 lbs 142.00-145.00, 800-900 lbs 128.00-136.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN STEERS: LGE 3: 200-400 lbs 110.00-115.00, 400-500 lbs 105.00-110.00, 500-600 lbs 106.00-117.00, 600-800 lbs 97.00-100.00, 800-1100 lbs 87.00-89.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 300-500 lbs 160.00-165.00 Fancy 175.00, 500-600 lbs 152.00-160.00 Fancy 165.00, 600-700 lbs 139.00-145.00 Fancy 180.00, 700-800 lbs 150.00-155.00, 800-900 lbs 96.00-110.00; MED/LGE 2: 300-500 lbs 125.00-140.00, 500-600 lbs 130.00-145.00, 600-700 lbs 127.00-132.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 300-500 lbs 140.00-160.00, 500-600 lbs 122.00-130.00, 600-800 lbs 135.00-140.00; MED/LGE 2: 700-900 lbs 111.00-115.00.

FEEDER HOLSTEIN BULLS: LGE 3: 150-200 lbs 130.00-137.00, 400-900 lbs 80.00-92.00.

Source: USDA Dept of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer 717-354-2391. John Stacy 717-354-2391.

NOTICE: Next feeder cattle sale July 12 at 6 p.m.

Vintage Sales Stables Monday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 135, Last week 260. CALVES: 107, Last week 93.

The steer market advanced higher this week from last. High-end Choice to Prime cattle traded 1.00-2.00 higher while low to average Choice cattle sold steady to firm. Light supplies and a more attractive show of cattle helped advanced the market higher, but demand remained light. Cows sold 1.00 higher with moderate demand. Cattle supply consisted of 65 steers, 17 heifers, 49 cows, 4 bulls, and 0 feeder. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1360-1570 lbs 124.00-127.00, 1610-1695 lbs 119.50-121.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1120-1560 lbs 120.50-123.50; SELECT 2-3: 1320-1490 lbs 118.50-119.00.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: CHOICE 2-3: 1120-1375 lbs 117.00-119.50.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 78.00-82.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 75.00-78.50, High dress 84.00-84.00; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 75.00-77.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 72.00-75.50, High dress 76.00-77.00, Low dress 61.50-68.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: no test.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: no report available.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350.

NOTICE: Next feeder cattle sale July 12.

Vintage Sales Stables Tuesday Auction
Paradise, Pa.
June 18, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 221, Last week 364, Last year 384. CALVES: 576, Last week 466, Last year 649.

Compared to last week: Slaughter Holstein Steers 1.00-2.00 higher compared to a light test last week. Demand good. Slaughter cows 1.00-2.00 higher on good demand. Slaughter cattle supplies consisted of 51 steers and heifers, 221 cows, 6 bulls, and 13 feeders. All prices quoted per cwt.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1400-1600 lbs 111.50-112.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1350-1650 lbs 106.00-109.00; SELECT 1-3: 1400-1650 lbs 100.50-105.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 77.00-79.50, High dress 83.50; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 79.00-83.50, High dress 84.00-86.50, Low dress 72.50-78.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 78.00-81.50, High dress 82.00-83.50, Low dress 71.50-77.50; LEAN: 85-90% lean, Avg dress 71.00-75.50, High dress 76.00-79.50, Low dress 65.00-70.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 1065-2475 lbs avg dress 89.00-92.00, high dress 94.00, low dress 82.00-84.50.

CALVES: Compared to last Tuesday’s sale, Holstein Bull calves sold 10.00-20.00 higher on good demand. Heifer calves sold steady to 10.00 higher on moderate demand. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 427 head for Tuesday’s sale. All calves are sold by the cwt.

GRADED HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES: #1: 90-120 lbs 140.00-160.00; #2: 80-113 lbs 125.00-140.00; #3: 75-110 lbs 70.00-90.00; UTILITY: 70-105 lbs 50.00-55.00, 73 lbs 25.00.

GRADED HOLSTEIN HEIFERS: #1: 93-115 lbs 100.00-120.00; #2: 84-93 lbs 70.00-90.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 65-93 lbs 20.00-40.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

NOTE: Next Feeder Sale July 12.

New Holland Thursday Cattle & Calves Auction
New Holland, Pa.
June 20, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

CATTLE: 1209, Last week 887, Last year 946. CALVES: 558, Last week 466, Last year 569.

When compared to last Thursday`s sale, slaughter steers sold mostly 1.00-2.00 lower on good demand. Slaughter Holsteins 1.00- 2.00 lower on a light test. Demand was moderate. Slaughter heifers mostly steady on a very light test. Slaughter cows sold mostly 1.00-2.00 lower on good demand. Cattle supplies included 555 slaughter steers; 92 heifers; 348 cows; 56 bulls; and 10 feeder cattle. All prices per cwt.

SLAUGHTER STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1250-1625 lbs 122.00-125.00, few to 126.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1300-1600 lbs 119.00-122.50; SELECT 1-3: 1250-1650 lbs 115.00-119.50.

SLAUGHTER HOLSTEIN STEERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1450-1625 lbs 109.00-112.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1550-1650 lbs 105.00-108.00; SELECT 1-3: 1400-1650 lbs 101.50-104.50.

SLAUGHTER HEIFERS: HIGH CHOICE/PRIME 3-4: 1150-1300 lbs 122.50-125.50; CHOICE 2-3: 1100-1300 lbs 115.50-119.00; SELECT 1-3: 1050-1400 lbs 102.00-110.00.

SLAUGHTER COWS: PREMIUM WHITE: 65-75% lean, Avg dress 79.00-82.00, Low dress 75.00-78.00; BREAKERS: 75-80% lean, Avg dress 80.00-83.00, High dress 84.50-86.50, Low dress 74.00-79.50; BONERS: 80-85% lean, Avg dress 78.00-81.00, High dress 82.00-83.00, Low dress 73.50-77.50; LEAN: 88-90% lean, Avg dress 74.00-78.50, High dress 79.00-82.00, Low dress 65.00-73.50.

SLAUGHTER BULLS: YG 1: 945-1625 lbs avg dress 93.00-97.50, 1175-2125 lbs high dress 99.00-107.50, very high dress 124.00-131.00, 1200-1785 lbs low dress 89.50-91.50.

RETURN TO FARM HOLSTEIN CALVES: Graded bull calves sold mostly 10.00-20.00 lower on moderate demand. Holstein heifer calves sold mostly steady on good demand. Ag Market News LLC under the USDA-QSA-LMAR program graded 408 head for this Thursday's graded sale. One hundred percent supply Holstein calves unless otherwise noted. All prices per cwt.

GRADED BULL CALVES: #1: 94-128 lbs 121.00-141.00, 90-92 lbs 90.00; #2: 98-128 lbs 115.00-120.00, 88-94 lbs 82.00-87.00, 80-86 lbs 65.00; #3: 72-130 lbs 44.00-62.00; UTILITY: 60-110 lbs 30.00-35.00.

HOLSTEIN HEIFER CALVES: 85-100 lbs 90.00-115.00; #2: 75-110 lbs 50.00-80.00; JERSEY/CROSSBRED: 60-100 lbs 70.00-100.00; UTILITY/NON TUBING: 55-85 lbs 15.00-30.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Mercer Livestock Special Sale
Mercer, Pa.
June 14, 2013
Report Supplied by Auction

Special feed lot/grass feeder, brood cow and bull sale. Prices per cwt except as noted.

FEEDERS STEERS: 500+ lbs 122.00-145.00, 500- lbs 130.00-150.00.

FEEDER HEIFERS: 500+ lbs 110.00-135.00, 500- lbs 125.00-155.00.

FEEDER BULLS: 1000+ lbs 95.00-150.00, 500-999 lbs 110.00-140.00, 500- lbs 110.00-140.00.

BROOD COW PAIRS (ea): 1000.00-1700.00.

BROOD COWS (ea): up to 1450.00.

VA Graded Feeder Cattle Summary
Richmond, Va.
June 13, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Virginia Feeder Cattle Summary Sales at Blackstone, Culpeper, Lynchburg, Marshall, Radiant and Winchester. State Graded Weighted Average for Jun 6-12, 2013.

Feeder Cattle: 4539 (Steers 2139; Heifers 2096; Bulls 304).

FEEDER STEERS: MED/LGE 1: 7 head, 300-400 lbs 135.00-152.00; 72 head, 400-500 lbs 133.00-148.50; 256 head, 500-600 lbs 121.00-150.50; 459 head, 600-700 lbs 118.00-160.00; 373 head, 700-800 lbs 110.00-150.00; 100 head, 800-900 lbs 105.00-130.75; 8 head, 900-1000 lbs 109.00. LGE 1: 8 head, 800-900 lbs 127.25. MED/LGE 1-2: 66 head, 400-500 lbs 141.25; 114 head, 500-600 lbs 135.00-145.25; 184 head, 600-700 lbs 116.00-139.00; 22 head, 800-900 lbs 125.50-127.25. MED/LGE 2: 20 head, 300-400 lbs 107.50-159.00; 104 head, 400-500 lbs 124.00-146.00; 111 head, 500-600 lbs 110.00-145.50; 66 head, 600-700 lbs 90.00-136.25; 22 head, 700-800 lbs 101.00-123.75; 4 head, 800-900 lbs 92.00-122.00. MED/LGE 3: 9 head, 300-400 lbs 110.00-145.00; 32 head, 400-500 lbs 82.00-141.00; 23 head, 500-600 lbs 111.00-135.75; 5 head, 600-700 lbs 95.00-126.50; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 110.00-114.00.

FEEDER BULLS: MED/LGE 1: 24 head, 400-500 lbs 105.00-140.00; 32 head, 500-600 lbs 99.00-133.00; 21 head, 600-700 lbs 109.50-123.00; 4 head, 700-800 lbs 85.00-109.50. LGE 1-2: 4 head, 500-600 lbs 99.00-105.00; 4 head, 600-700 lbs 95.00-101.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 9 head, 600-700 lbs 121.00. MED/LGE 2: 14 head, 300-400 lbs 131.00-155.00; 86 head, 400-500 lbs 101.00-146.75; 32 head, 500-600 lbs 110.00-130.00; 19 head, 600-700 lbs 91.00-121.50.

FEEDER HEIFERS: MED/LGE 1: 12 head, 300-400 lbs 135.00-146.50; 70 head, 400-500 lbs 90.00-134.00; 292 head, 500-600 lbs 110.00-141.00; 249 head, 600-700 lbs 111.00-140.50; 235 head, 700-800 lbs 93.00-125.00; 142 head, 800-900 lbs 101.00-121.00. MED/LGE 1-2: 122 head, 400-500 lbs 130.00-134.00; 174 head, 500-600 lbs 133.50; 127 head, 600-700 lbs 114.00-124.75; 12 head, 700-800 lbs 111.50. LGE 1-2: 8 head, 600-700 lbs 100.00-113.00. MED/LGE 2: 42 head, 300-400 lbs 127.00-150.00; 142 head, 400-500 lbs 99.00-132.50; 146 head, 500-600 lbs 105.00-128.00; 57 head, 600-700 lbs 107.50-125.00; 5 head, 700-800 lbs 105.00-108.00. MED/LGE 3: 5 head, 200-300 lbs 112.00-135.00; 19 head, 300-400 lbs 119.00-145.50; 66 head, 400-500 lbs 108.00-127.00; 56 head, 500-600 lbs 94.00-127.25; 17 head, 600-700 lbs 110.00-114.00; 11 head, 700-800 lbs 98.50-106.00.

Source: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. USDA-VA Market News, Richmond, VA. 804.786-3947.

U.S. Livestock, Dairy & Poultry Outlook
Washington, D. C.
June 18, 2013
Reports supplied by USDA/ERS

Livestock Imports Lower Into 2014

BEEF/CATTLE: Continuing drought in most of the Western United States and declining cow-calf producer profit margins are continuing to motivate second-quarter cow slaughter that could exceed second-quarter 2012 slaughter and could result in a further January 1 cow inventory decline in 2014.

BEEF/CATTLE TRADE: Beef exports in 2013 are forecast at 2.3 billion pounds, 6 percent lower year-over-year. U.S. cattle imports are forecast lower in 2013 at 2.05 million head.

PORK/HOGS: Second-quarter pork production was adjusted lower to account for slowerthan- expected hog slaughter and slightly lower dressed weights in June. Second-quarter commercial pork production is forecast at 5.52 billion pounds. April pork exports were 12 percent below a year ago, largely due to weaknesses in Asian demand. Estimates for live swine imports for 2013 and 2014 were adjusted downward to reflect lower imports from Canada.

POULTRY: Broiler meat production in April 2013 was 3.2 billion pounds, an increase of 6.6 percent from the previous year, as the number of birds slaughtered and the average live weight were both higher. Total broiler meat production in the second quarter is estimated at 9.5 billion pounds, 1.3 percent higher than a year earlier. Turkey production was also higher in April, totaling 504 million pounds. However, unlike broilers, turkey meat production is forecast to decline in second-quarter 2013 to 1.8 billion pounds, a decrease of 2 percent from a year earlier.

POULTRY TRADE: Broiler and egg and egg products shipments in April 2013 were up from a year ago, while turkey shipments were down over the same period. Broiler exports rose 2.5 percent from a year ago, totaling 613 million pounds in April 2013. Egg and egg product exports totaled 30.8 million dozen in April 2013, an increase of 27 percent from last April. Turkey shipments dropped 13 percent from a year earlier, totaling 56 million pounds.

DAIRY: Milk and dairy product price forecasts were changed only slightly in June from May. Production forecasts were unchanged for 2013 and lowered slightly for 2014. Fat-basis exports are weaker than earlier expected, but powder exports remain brisk. Stocks of butter and cheese are raised from last month.

Source: rjohnson@ers.usda.gov

U.S. Turkeys
Washington, D.C.
June 17, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

Eggs in Incubators Down 13%: Turkey eggs in incubators on June 1, 2013, in the United States totaled 26.4 million, down 13 percent from June 1, 2012. Eggs in incubators were up slightly from the May 1, 2013 total of 26.3 million eggs.

Poults Hatched Down 13%: Turkey poults hatched during May 2013, in the United States totaled 22.1 million, down 13 percent from May 2012. Poults hatched were down 4 percent from the April 2013 total of 23.0 million poults.

Net Poults Placed Down 13%: The 21.8 million net poults placed during May 2013 in the United States were down 13 percent from the number placed during the same month a year earlier. Net placements were down 2 percent from the April 2013 total of 22.1 million.

Released June 17, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

New Holland Weekly Dairy Sale
New Holland, Pa.
June 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 257, Last Sale: 719, Last Year: 251.

Compared to last week, dairy cows sold mostly steady. Demand was good. Bred Holstein heifers sold mostly steady compared to last week. Demand was moderate on all heifers offered. Wednesday’s supply included 87 fresh milking cows, 29 short-bred cows, 23 springing cows, 35 short-bred heifers, 40 springing heifers, 28 open heifers, and 10 bulls. One hundred percent of reported supply Holsteins unless otherwise noted. All sales sold on a per head basis.

FRESH COWS: Supreme: 1700.00-2100.00; Approved: 1500.00-1650.00; Medium: 1350.00-1475.00; Common: 1000.00-1300.00.

SHORT BRED COWS (1-3 months): Supreme: 1400.00-1600.00; Approved: 1200.00-1350.00; Medium: 1050.00-1150.00; Common: 950.00-1000.00.

BRED COWS (4-6 months): Approved: 1275.00; Medium: 1050.00-1075.00; Common: 925.00-1000.00.

SPRINGING COWS (7-9 months): Supreme: 1700.00; Approved: 1400.00-1550.00; Medium: 1250.00-1350.00; Common: 1100.00-1200.00.

CULL COWS: 600.00-1125.00.

SHORT BRED HEIFERS (1-3 months): Approved: 1100.00-1125.00; Medium: 950.00-1000.00; Common: 750.00-850.00.

BRED HEIFERS (4-6 months): Supreme: 1300.00-1400.00; Approved: 1100.00-1225.00; Medium: 1000.00-1075.00; Common: 900.00-975.00.

SPRINGING HEIFERS (7-9 months): Approved: 1400.00-1525.00; Medium: 1250.00-1375.00; Common: 1000.00-1225.00.

OPEN HEIFERS: 300-600 LBS: Approved: 500.00-550.00; Common: 235.00-310.00. 600-900 LBS: Approved: 625.00-700.00. 900-1200 LBS: Approved: 825.00-900.00.

BULLS: 600-900 lbs 775.00, 900-1200 lbs 750.00-1100.00, 1200-1500 lbs 1000.00-1550.00.

Source: USDA Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Dairy Product Price Highlights
Washington, D. C.
June 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

BUTTER prices received for 25 kilogram and 68 pound boxes meeting United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Grade AA standards averaged $1.57 per pound for the week ending June 15, 2013. The United States (US) price per pound increased 1.9 cents from the previous week.

CHEDDAR CHEESE prices received for US 40 pound blocks averaged $1.76 per pound for the week ending June 15, 2013. The price per pound decreased 2.2 cents from the previous week. The price for US 500 pound barrels adjusted to 38 percent moisture averaged $1.77 per pound, up 0.9 cents from the previous week.

DRY WHEY prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade standards averaged 57.4 cents per pound for the week ending June 15, 2013. The US price per pound increased 0.6 cents from the previous week.

NONFAT DRY MILK prices received for bag, tote, and tanker sales meeting USDA Extra Grade or United States Public Health Service (USPHS) Grade A standards averaged $1.68 per pound for the week ending June 15, 2013. The US price per pound decreased 0.2 cents from the previous week.

East Fluid Milk & Cream Review
Madison, Wis.
June 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Fluid cream and condensed skim prices in tanklot quantities: spot prices of class II cream, dollars per lb. Butterfat: F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast 2.0482-2.2176.

Prices of condensed skim, dollars per lb. solids, F.O.B. producing plants: Northeast - Class II - includes monthly formula prices 1.53-1.63. Northeast - Class III - spot prices 1.46-1.56.

Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of FLORIDA: THIS WK: In 0, Out 92; LAST WK: In 0, Out 188; LAST YR: In 0, Out 150. Spot Shipments of Grade A Milk into or out of other SOUTHEASTERN STATES: 0.

Weather conditions favorable of cow comfort levels in the Northeast and Mid- Atlantic regions have supported a strong and prolonged seasonal milk flush. Manufacturing milk supplies continue to be heavy and above year ago levels. Class I demand is near its seasonal low point as nearly all schools have closed for summer break. Numerous rains this past week over both regions severely limited farm field work and hay harvest activities. Severe drought conditions in Florida have been eliminated in the wake of Tropical Storm Andrea. The weather following the storm has turned hot and humid, causing considerable declines in milk production.

Class I demand did show some increase compared to the previous week. The combination of reduced milk production and marginally increased fluid demand limited exports to 92 spot loads this week. Milk production in the Southeast is holding about steady with last week. Milk supplies continue to exceed demand, requiring the utilization of auxiliary manufacturing plants. Load rejections, due to temperature issues, continue to be a problem with transports out of the most southern areas of the region.

Demand for cream is increasing and reducing the flow of cream to churns. Increased pulls for cream are coming from ice cream, cream cheese, whipping cream manufacturers and cream bottlers. Butterfat levels in off farm milk supplies remain above year ago levels, but the margin above year ago levels is declining. Some market analysts foresee butterfat levels equaling year ago levels in July. Cream multiples for all Classes moved higher this week and range 1.28-1.44. Demand for condensed skim milk remains flat with little spot sale activity. Supplies quickly exceed demand, maintaining heavy volumes going to Class IV production.

Some Class II spot sales continue to be discounted, due to the heavy available volumes. A closer look at fluid milk sales, showed an increase in April total fluid milk products of 1.1%. This increase is mostly attributable to flavored milk sales, which had a 17.1% increase in April for flavored whole milk sales and an 8.7% increase for flavored reduced fat milk sales. Flavored milk sales stemmed the decline in year to date fluid milk product sales from -3.3% in March to -2.3% in April. Some market analysts have suggested the national promotion of flavored milk as a sports drink is prompting the increase in sales.

rick.whipp@ams.usda.gov

U.S. Milk Production Update
Washington, D.C.
June 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/NASS

May Milk Production up 0.9%: Milk production in the 23 major States during May totaled 16.5 billion pounds, up 0.9 percent from May 2012. April revised production, at 16.1 billion pounds, was up 0.2 percent from April 2012. The April revision represented a decrease of 20 million pounds or 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate.

Special Note: Due to sequestration, administrative data will be used for all releases of this report through the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 2013. Releases will contain milk production data only. No information on the number of cows or milk per cow will be released. Please check the NASS website at www.nass.usda.gov for any future updates on NASS programs.

Released June 19, 2013, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

New Holland Hog Auction
New Holland, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 1080; Last Week: 993; Year Ago: 958.

When compared to last week`s sale, slaughter barrows and gilts sold mostly 3.00-4.00 higher with good demand. Sows traded 2.00- 3.00 higher with good demand. All prices per cwt.

BARROWS/GILTS: 49-54% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 71.00-73.00, 300-400 lbs 57.00-61.00; 45-49% LEAN: 220-300 lbs 66.00-70.50, 300-400 lbs 54.00-56.00.

SOWS: US 1-3: 300-500 lbs 56.50-58.00, 500-700 lbs 59.50-63.00.

BOARS: 300-700 lbs 18.00-20.00.

Source: USDA Agricultural Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

New Holland Feeder Pig Auction
New Holland, Pa.
June 19, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

Receipts: 341; Last sale: 299.

When compared to the most recent sale 2 weeks ago, feeder pigs sold unevenly steady with good demand. Trade was active with good buyer attendance. All feeder pigs are sold per cwt.

US 1-2: 35 head, 15-25 lbs 200.00-210.00; 104 head, 25-30 lbs 160.00-180.00; 116 head, 30-40 lbs 140.00-180.00; 26 head, 40-50 lbs 120.00-140.00; 8 head, 60-65 lbs 100.00-105.00.

Source: USDA Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Note: Next feeder pig sale July 3.

New Holland Weekly Horse Sale
New Holland, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Report Supplied by Auction

165 total head. Overall market steady with active trading. Prices per head.

Work: 500.00-700.00.

Driving: 525.00-600.00.

Riding: 300.00-500.00.

Better Riding: 550.00-1100.00.

Registered Riding: 1000.00-1500.00.

Ponies: 150.00-450.00.

Large Ponies: 275.00-1050.00.

Colts: 50.00-150.00.

New Holland Sheep & Goat Auction
New Holland, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Reports Supplied by USDA

SHEEP/LAMB RECEIPTS: 2750; Last Monday: 1594; Year Ago: 1345.

GOAT RECEIPTS: 1873; Last Monday: 1730; Year Ago: 1975.

SHEEP/LAMBS: When compared to last week, slaughter lambs sold mostly 10.00-20.00 lower. Slaughter ewes traded steady to weak. Demand was moderate for all classes. Slaughter supply consisted of 83 percent lambs, 10 percent slaughter ewes, and 7 percent miscellaneous stock. All sheep and lambs are destined for non-traditional markets. All sheep and lambs are sold by the hundred weight,on actual weights. Non-Traditional Markets:

SLAUGHTER LAMBS: WOOLED/SHORN: CHOICE/PRIME 2-3: 50-80 lbs 155.00-166.00, 80-100 lbs 158.00-160.00; GOOD/CHOICE 1-3: 40-60 lbs 130.00-150.00, hair sheep 127.00-132.00, 60-80 lbs 135.00-152.00, 70-80 lbs hair sheep 127.00-150.00, 80-100 lbs 126.00-146.00, 120-125 lbs 140.00-144.00; UTILITY/GOOD 1-2: 40-60 lbs 100.00-125.00, hair sheep 112.00-124.00, 60-80 lbs 100.00-128.00, hair sheep 100.00-122.00, 80-110 lbs 100.00-132.00, hair sheep 94.00-126.00.

SLAUGHTER EWES: GOOD 2-3: Medium Flesh 82 lbs hair sheep 80.00, 80-110 lbs 62.00-70.00, 110-160 lbs 54.00-70.00, 110-190 lbs hair sheep 56.00-68.00, 160-200 lbs 44.00-60.00, 183 lbs hair sheep 46.00; UTILITY 1-2: Thin Flesh 90-160 lbs 40.00-54.00, 100-130 lbs hair sheep 44.00-54.00, 160-180 lbs 38.00-44.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS: 100-160 lbs hair sheep 64.00-85.00, 140-160 lbs 47.00-72.00, 160-200 lbs 40.00-76.00, 200-250 lbs 48.00-70.00.

SLAUGHTER GOATS: When compared to last week, slaughter kid goats sold mostly steady. Slaughter Nanny goats sold mostly steady to 10.00 higher. Slaughter billies sold steady. Demand was moderate for all classes. Slaughter supply consisted of 63 percent Slaughter Kids, 28 percent Slaughter Nannies, and 9 percent bucks/billies and wethers. All Goats are sold by the head on estimated weights.

SLAUGHTER KIDS (hd): SEL 1: 40-60 lbs 140.00-160.00, 60-80 lbs 135.00-172.00, 80-90 lbs 165.00-185.00; SEL 2: 40-60 lbs 112.00-135.00, 60-80 lbs 112.00-130.00, 80-110 lbs 140.00-157.00; SEL 3: 40-60 lbs 45.00-96.00, 60-80 lbs 96.00-110.00.

SLAUGHTER NANNIES/DOES (hd): SEL 1: 100-125 lbs 145.00-190.00, 130-150 lbs 177.00-217.00; SEL 2: 80-125 lbs 107.00-145.00, 130-150 lbs 125.00-137.00; SEL 3: 60-80 lbs 70.00-92.00, 80-110 lbs 77.00-100.00.

SLAUGHTER BUCKS/BILLIES (hd): SEL 1: 130-150 lbs 210.00-240.00, 150-200 lbs 200.00-280.00; SEL 2: 100-150 lbs 150.00-200.00, 150-160 162.00-167.00.

SLAUGHTER WETHERS (hd): SEL 1: 70-100 lbs 232.00-295.00, 100-150 lbs 262.00-312.00; SEL 2: 70-100 lbs 180.00-225.00, 100-150 lbs 140.00-250.00.

Source: USDA Dept. of Ag Market News, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-406-7350. John Stacy, 717-354-2391.

Average Farm Feed Costs for Handy Reference
Ephrata, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Compiled by Jessica Rose Spangler

To provide farmers across the state with a handy reference of commodity input costs in their feeding operations for DHIA record sheets or to develop livestock feed cost data, here are last week’s average costs of various ingredients as compiled from regional reports across the state of Pennsylvania.

Remember, these are averages, so you will need to adjust your figures up or down according to your location and the quality of your crop.

CORN, No. 2: 7.01 bu, 12.55 cwt.

WHEAT, No. 2: 6.40 bu, 10.69 cwt.

BARLEY, No. 3: 4.13 bu, 8.84 cwt.

OATS, No. 2: 4.39 bu, 13.70 cwt.

SOYBEANS, No. 2: 14.83 bu, 24.76 cwt.

ALFALFA HAY: 225.00 ton, 11.25 cwt.

MIXED HAY: 197.50 ton, 9.88 cwt.

TIMOTHY HAY: 163.75 ton, 8.19 cwt.

Note: Values for ear corn available by printing time.

PA Grain Report
New Holland, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA

When compared to last week cash bids; corn, wheat, and beans were mostly lower across the state. Bases are holding mostly steady for the eastern and central regions, although some weakening of the basis was noted for corn in the central, and beans in the eastern region. USDA released their WASDE (World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates) Report last week, which left US planted acreage the same as its earlier estimates and reduced estimated corn yields by 1.5 bushels. The report was considered bearish; taking in account the trade expected USDA to reduce acreage and yields by much more, although USDA typically will not change acreage until their end of June “Acreage Report”. There is no doubt that some acreage was lost or converted to beans, but whether it’s 1% or 5%, production should be more than adequate to meet demand unless damaging weather emerges. Currently weather outlooks are favorable for the growing season with rain and moderate temperatures forecasted for Kansas, Missouri, and Illinois. Iowa will remain dry until later in the week which should allow farmers back in the fields for soybean planting, provided the fields have good drainage. Corn planting is completed for the year and 92% of the crop is emerged according to USDA’s Crop Progress Report. Crop conditions are well off, with 63% of the crop in good to excellent condition, 28% in fair condition, and only 9% in poor or very poor condition. 85% of the soybeans have been planted with 66% emerged, compared to 91% and 80% on the 5 yr average. 56% of the crop is in good to excellent condition, 32% in fair, and 11% in poor to very poor condition. All grain and soybean prices are quoted per bushel delivered to the mill or elevator. Bases reflect last Friday’s CME close against Monday morning’s cash bids.

Us No 2 Yellow Corn: EASTERN: 7.0500-7.3500, dn 10-dn 11, 50n to 80n, unch. CENTRAL: 6.8000-7.3500, dn 20-dn 15, 25n to 80n, dn 10-dn 5. WESTERN: 6.5500-6.7500, up 40-dn 11, optn to 20n, up 50-unch.

Us No 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat: EASTERN: 6.3000-6.5600, dn 86-dn 110, -50n to -25n, dn 70-dn 95. CENTRAL: 6.0000-6.7500, no comp, -80n to -5n, no comp. WESTERN: 6.3100-6.4500, dn 15-dn 16, -50n to -35n, unch.

Us No 3 Feed Barley: EASTERN: 4.0000-4.2500, dn 10-dn 25. CENTRAL: 4.0000-4.5000, dn 115-dn 75.

Us No 2 White Oats: EASTERN: 4.3000-4.7000, up 30-unch, 30n to 70n, up 38-up 8. CENTRAL: 4.0000-5.1000, no comp, optn to 110n, no comp.

Us No 2 Soybeans: EASTERN: 14.7600-15.1900, dn 24-dn 22, -40n to optn, dn 12-dn 10. CENTRAL: 14.3600-15.0000, dn 14-dn 23, -80n to -15n, unch-dn 10. WESTERN: 14.3400-15.0650, dn 84-dn 16.5, -80n to -10n, dn 70-dn 5.

Average Bid Price: EASTERN: Corn 7.21; Wheat 6.46; Barley 4.13; Oats 4.50; Soybeans 14.98. CENTRAL: Corn 7.15; Wheat 6.38; Barley 4.13; Oats 4.28; Soybeans 14.68. WESTERN: Corn 6.68; Wheat 6.37; Soybeans 14.82.

Eastern Contracts: CORN: 5.3300-5.5800, dn 27-dn 25, optz to 25z, unch. WHEAT: 6.4100-6.8700, dn 9-up 22, -60z to -15z, up 10-up 40. SOYBEANS: 12.5900-12.8000, dn 1-dn 15, -40x to -20x, up 30-up 17.

Source: USDA Market News Service, New Holland, PA. Levi Geyer, 717-354-2391.

HELPFUL HINTS: Commodity or Location = price per bushel, change in price from last week, basis or the difference between the cash price and a specified futures price, change in basis from last week. Dn = down. Unch = unchanged.

NOTE: Ag Market News will continue to publish the old PA Grain Report format for a limited time at www.agmarketnews.com.

PA Regional Hay
Lewisburg, Pa.
June 17, 2013
Report Supplied by Ag Market News

Dealer Hay & Straw Market for Eastern, Pa.: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and per ton. Compared to last week, hay sold 20.00-50.00 lower and straw 25.00-65.00 higher. All hay and straw reported sold per ton. ALFALFA: 120.00-250.00. MIXED: 75.00-220.00. TIMOTHY: 75.00-200.00. STRAW: 80.00-160.00. MULCH: 50.00-60.00.

Summary of Lancaster Area Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 93 loads. Straw: 33 loads. ALFALFA: 120.00-410.00. MIXED: 80.00-380.00. TIMOTHY: 135.00-225.00. GRASS: 100.00-250.00. STRAW: 107.00-270.00.

Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices per ton. Hay: 49 loads; Straw: 15 loads. ALFALFA: 120.00. MIXED: 50.00-280.00. TIMOTHY: 50.00-245.00. GRASS: 50.00-175.00. STRAW: 90.00-220.00.

Source: Ag Market News, LLC. Dave Wert, 570-490-5587. www.AgMarketNews.com.

U.S. Feed Outlook
Washington, D. C.
June 14, 2013
Reports supplied by USDA/ERS

Feed Grain Supply Prospects Lowered on Delayed Plantings

The outlook for 2013/14 U.S. feed grain supplies is lowered this month as delayed plantings reduce yield prospects for corn. Corn production is projected 135 million bushels lower at 14.0 billion, with the average yield projected at 156.5 bushels per acre, down 1.5 bushels from last month. Forecast total use is down 70 million bushels to 12.9 billion. Feed and residual use is lowered 125 million bushels to 5.2 billion, but industrial use is raised 55 million. The projected 2013/14 season-average farm price for corn is raised $0.10 at both ends of the range to $5.20 to $4.40 per bushel, with a resulting midpoint of $4.80 per bushel. Prices are also raised for sorghum, barley, and oats. For 2012/13, corn imports and industrial use are increased, but exports are lowered, leaving forecast ending stocks up 10 million bushels. U.S. prices for old-crop corn are high compared with competitors, encouraging imports and discouraging exports. Brazil’s 2012/13 corn production is record large and raised again this month.

Honey Monthly Update
Washington, D.C.
June 18, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Colony, Honey Plant & Market Conditions During May 2013

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT (MD, PA, VA, WV): May weather was all over the place. Starting out with fair skies, by the weekend of May 11-12 a late frost struck the District with sporadic injury to blooms depending on location and elevation. Following this frost were rainy, cooler than normal temperatures and then before the month was over, temperatures soared to the upper eighties and lower nineties with no precipitation for several days. The month exited with a return to rainy, cool, overcast days. Soil moisture levels are adequate for the most part; however, by the end of the month, the topsoil was needing moisture. Nectar supplies have been fairly good for most of the month. Fruit orchards finished bloom by mid-month. Locust, tulip poplar and sourwood had a good bloom period and bees were able to gather pollen during times when the weather cooperated. Near the end of the month strawberries finished bloom and white clover, blackberry, the start of honeysuckle were serving as nectar sources. The colonies that survived the winter are builing up; however, many beekeepers had to replace colonies due to winter loss.

NEW ENGLAND: Weather for May featured a pattern that has been seasonal with temperatures normal for most of the month in Southern New England (Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island). This month’s weather in Northern New England (Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont) featured a pattern of cooler, unstable temperatures with a mixture of some mild to warm days and some cool to cold temperature days. A lot of rain at night is a bee’s delight. Precipitation for the month was above normal with all regions reporting high moisture levels that helped push earlier than normal ornamental and floral sources for pollen and nectar such as dandelion (taraxacum officinale) as well as ornamental Japanese maple, red maple, willows and crab apple. Dandelion (taraxacum officinale), and ground ivy was very productive this year. Rainy conditions have helped dandelions produce more nectar and pollen as they exhibit shallow roots. Its nectar is very tasty and produces golden honey that is strong in flavor and the pollen is orange in color. The species of dandelion called epithet officinale refers to its medicinal qualities. Additional early sources exhibiting early bloom were chokecherry(prunus virginiana), black cherry, blackberry(prunus serotina), pin cherry(prunus pensylvanica), peaches(prunus persica), plums(prunis Americana), apples(malus), as well as honeysuckle(lonicerata tarian), blueberry(vaccinium), black locust, glossy buckthorn, hawkweed(king devil), chive, mustard and lilac. Additional good pollen plants are greater celandine (chelidonium majus), autumn olive (elaeagnus umbellate), Russian olive (elaeagnus angustifolia) and silverberry (elaeagnus commutate).

Early in the month, cold and rainy weather with too little sun and 3-7 days of wet, cool weather were responsible in Northern New England, for slowing spring buildup and nectar flows. The cooler weather at the end of the month has slowed plant growth and farm plantings especially eggplant. So there have been fewer blossoms to pollinate, however most orchards currently are getting the needed pollination. This is that noted time of the year known as the fruit bloom on the beekeepers calendar. Apple pollination was reportedly heavy as pollination hives were quickly placed into the orchards about on schedule followed by cold and wet weather. Reportedly some keepers have addressed fruit grower needs especially apples, by setting up beehives no later than the 2nd week of May. This year pollination fees are set at $75.00 to $100.00 mostly $80.00 per hive with 4- hives per pallet and a 1- pallet minimum. Pollination hives have been deployed to apples, blueberries and other earlier crops but were cut short by continual rain and cool temperatures. Hopefully growers had enough pollination to set a crop.

There were some reported frost conditions in some of the more remote areas. Many keepers early on had observed pollen frenzies at the front porches of their hives, mostly cream colored and orange pollens as activity was intense. Regionally, the major portion of spring nectar flow emanates from chestnut and black locust bloom. In full bloom are sources such as apples (malus, spp.), apricots (prunus armeniaca), plum (prunus spp.), pears (pyrus communis), red currant (riber rubrum), wild plum (prunus Americana), pin cherry (prunus pensylvanica), choke cherry (prunus virginiana), and blueberry. Bees are actively collecting from other pollen and nectar sources such as greater celandine, dogwood, honeysuckle, numerous clovers, mostly sweet clover, lilac, mustard, glossy buckthorn, hawkweed, mint, chive, black cherry, wild flowers and other flowering ornamental trees and shrubs.Purportedly, many hives have had good brood that has been hatching during this wet weather and the congestion is likely to stimulate the swarming impulse as swarms are expected to be prolific when we catch the next series of warm sunny days.

Nectar has been strong since mid-May and many hives have become honey bound thus limiting the queens ability to find cells for their eggs. Reportedly, hives experiencing superseded queens usually show offspring bees of a different coloring. Already reports of swarm activity are problematic for those who did not make splits and put off supering.

Reportedly, health wise, and generally speaking, over wintered hives are doing well with lots of brood building up with full foundation expansion and plenty of forging/worker bees. Honeybees came through the winter in good condition and this has resulted in the potential of swarming and early buildup of varroa mites. Seasoned beekeepers are predicting potential swarming by the same colonies in August. Bee associations advise beekeepers to be diligent in preventing swarms and to be watching for varroa mites. The May honeybees’ primary objective is to store as much nectar as possible. The urge later in the month to swarm becomes secondary but it’s still possible if they get crowded. Beekeepers are monitoring their colonies often, adding supers or making splits and divides when hives become too crowded, especially using the technique of making new colonies with capped brood frames with swarm colonies. A swarm leaves the hive with little brood to boost the population for at least 3 weeks. The hive needs an abundance of foraging bees to bring in a honey crop. In regional pocket areas where weather was clearly seasonal, colony strength numbers increased however, hive winter losses were reportedly as high as 50%, especially in Massachusetts. Keepers report that bees are primed for comb building and expansion at this time of the year especially regarding reversing hive bodies. Comb renewal is part of ensuring a healthy environment for the bees. The main beekeeper activities at this point in time are: evaluating your queen’s productivity, examining brood patterns and how much they are in balance status, along with making sure there are not any laying workers or drone only laying queens. Additionally, what is your supering needs as well as looking at (IPM) integrated pest management programs and options for disease and mite problems. Reportedly, package bees from Georgia were in short supply and were delayed this year by two-three weeks with some keepers receiving their bees by June 1st. This late start means that they have missed much of the best natural nectar that helps package buildup making feeding a must. Reportedly, package queens were better than in past years with fewer reports of dead queens and drone layers which could possibly be the result of later queen production and better mating conditions in the south. Spring splits have been developing normally, but require higher sugar ratios for heat generation and protein supplement due to wet conditions slowing natural nectar and pollen availability. Purportedly, this year there seems to be an issue with hive absconding, where by all the bees leave a hive without a decodable reason. Post collapse evidence has shown tracheal mites and some reports of small hive beetles from packages and nucs.

Pesticides continue to be a concern to all beekeepers. There have been many reported instances where beekeepers that provide bees to growers for pollination purposes have complained to their grower employers and their beekeeper associations with the concern of the practice of broadcast spraying of crop fungicides in a timely way that puts their pollination hives in high risk circumstances. There is an ongoing national dialogue concerning the issue of how much pollination services are being negatively affected by particular grower fungicide practices and how much there is a risk causal relationship in this regard. Most New England keepers report that if the present nice weather conditions continue than we should anticipate having an early honey crop and better than average production for the year. Demand at all retail/wholesale outlets remains good and honey sales remain firm. Prices quoted for retail 1lb bottled units were strong and quoted at $7.00 to $10.00 mostly $10.00 and occasionally higher inclusive of all varieties; for food service operations prices were strong with 5 gallon units selling at $185.00 to $225.00 mostly $220.00 occasionally higher for all raw and natural honey depending on variety and quality.

NEW YORK: In the Finger Lakes region, early flows have been strong by several pollen sources, including dandelion and a huge maple nectar flow, and transitioning to black locust currently. Weather conditions have been forecasted to be conducive for a good locust harvest also. Erratic weather patterns, including strong storms and rapid changing temperatures swings, hot to cold, have been impediments to colony management, as well as the later arrival of nucs, which had slowed hive development. There have been a few reports of pesticide damage to some bees in Western New York. As the apple blossoms drop, black locust is beginning to bloom, although the last week of the month has brought excessive showers and cloud cover, which was not conducive for flights. At this time, some beekeepers remained skeptical of a good honey flow season.

In the Saint Lawrence River Valley, bees have appeared to overwinter well with minimal losses; the extended period of cold weather in April fostered some starvation within the hive. One commercial beekeeper commented on some winter losses with his hives in South Carolina, due to the cold. The hives used all of their stores to survive, with little or no honey harvested. Apple blossoms were a few days earlier than expected, and beekeepers scrambled to move hives to the orchards as the bloom cycle progressed quickly. Forage sources also included a great dandelion period, leafy spurge and some clover, with honeysuckle beginning at month’s end. Thus far, the recent moisture and heat units are expected to promote a good honey season.

Reports from the Catskills were also upbeat on the smaller losses over the winter. There was a rapid onset of multiple bloom sources early in the month for foraging, including apples, dandelion, autumn olive, and an extended maple bloom period. Some swarm activity has been noted at month’s end.

In Western New York, there have been some reports of pesticide damage to bees.

OHIO: The month brought lots of bloom as nectar sources for bees, including catalpa, honeysuckle, Russian olive and black locust. Some supers have been pulled already, and package bees have adapted well, in spite of later delivery. Prices have continued to inch upwards, due to several factors. The South American honey forecast is for an average crop, with Canada expected to be down due to lower bee count, and the recent Chinese honey laundering scam should limit illegal honey imports.

Source: www.marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv or www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/fvmhoney.pdf.

Apple Processing Report
Fresno, Calif.
June 13, 2013
Report Supplied by USDA/AMS

Utilized for Processing in 1 ton Units in Appalachian District

JUICE APPLES: Week ending 5/18: 372; Week ending 5/25: 287; Week ending 6/1: 366; Week ending 6/8: 294; 2012 to date: 53291; 2011 to date: 61021; Final 2011: 62576.

CANNER APPLES: Week ending 5/18: 3894; Week ending 5/25: 2580; Week ending 6/1: 2990; Week ending 6/8: 2488; 2012 to date: 187715; 2011 to date: 196941; Final 2011: 209853.

TOTAL APPLES: Week ending 5/18: 4266; Week ending 5/25: 2867; Week ending 6/1: 3356; Week ending 6/8: 2782; 2012 to date: 241006; 2011 to date: 257962; Final 2011: 272429.

Trading

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT(VA, WV, MD, PA): The past week was a rainy one for the District as tropical storm Andrea came up the coast with several inches of moisture following by several other passing storms. Temperatures have returned to more seasonably normal levels current week.

Imports

PORTS OF ENTRY EAST COAST: Prices for apple juice concentrate for the period June 6 - 12, 2013. Acidity 1.0-2.2 percent weight/weight as malic acid, color 40-70 percent, brix minimum of 70.0, various containers (drums, bins, or bulk liquid packaging). Sales Ex Doc, excludes freight charges, all duties paid, containers included unless otherwise stated. Prices offered to importers per gallon basis in U.S. Dollars. China $7.90-8.25 mostly $7.90-8.00.

Shipping Point Trends

No trends for Appalachian District or New York.

NOTE: For a complete national report, visit marketnews.usda.gov/portal/fv, or call 559-487-5178.


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12/17/2014 | Last Updated: 1:30 PM